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5. DAVIS & SONS, LARGEST CIGAR MANUFACTURERS IN CA./ADA, 



r.TU 



( 



Published 
weekly 

Cooper year 




VOL. VI. 



TORONTO. JANUARY 6, 1893. 



No. 1 





— O - 



COLMAHS MUSTARD 



| HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 




ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 



TWO • GOLD *JV\EDALS 
INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EXHIBITION LONDON 13B4 

Only Trija ftedaL JondonlS62, kd? Only SilvterM«dal.?aris.W5 
Only >\cdal Dublin. 1S65, ' §g? q?&vid qoU/^M^osoovf. ISJZl^ 



6]> 



Urn 



& 



1 

s 



ASK YOUR 
WHOLESALE GROCER 



-FOR 



RAILROAD AND STEAMSHIP 

MATCHES 



GUARANTEED 
Second to None. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 
56 AND 58 FRONT ST. W. 

TO"ROIsrTO. 




MAKE SIMPLY WITH BOILING MILK OR WATER 

FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS. 



DUNN'S 
BAKING 
POWDER 

THECOOK'S BEST FRIEND 

Largest Sale in Canada. 



Don tjail to handle 



THE CELEBRATED IMPORTED 

MENIER'5 

WML 



ANNUAL SALES EXCEED 33 MILLION LBS. 

TO HAVE IT ADVERTISED 
FREE & FREELY 

IN YOUR OWN NAME AMONGST 
YOUB CUSTOMERS WRITE TO 

C.ALFRED Chouillou agent Montreal. 



LA CADENA " and " LA FLORA " The Cream of the Havana Crop. 




THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The McKay Milling Co., Ltd., 

OTTAWA, 

Manufacturers of High Grade Patents, Strong Bakers, 

and Family Flours. 

fl k X]VTEfl.Ii ,,N ^ Granuiated Mid Cut ' Fine Cut - Fi ° ur Cut and R ° und Cut - 



WE MAKE THE CELEBRATED 



ROLLED OATS. 



R. £n [\ WATSON, Manufacturing Gonfectioners, 



IF you wish to handle the MOST SALABLE 
CONFECTION in the market try BALA LICO- 
RICE. We are Headquarters for Fine Choco- 
lates, Creams, Swiss Fruits and One Cent Goods, 
Icing Sugar, Cake Ornaments, etc 

SEND FOR IPIRIOIE LIST. 

75 Front Street East, 



KOFF NO MORE. 

WATSON'S COUGH DROPS 

Will give positive and instant relief to 
those suffering from Colds, Hoarseness, 
Sore Throat, etc., and are invaluable to J 
Orators and Vocalists. R. & T. W. 
stamped on each drop. Try them. 

TORONTO. 



The Nation Manufacturing Co. 

E P. breckenridge, C. C. Warren, 

President. Secretary. 

Edwin Norton, W. C. Breckenridge, 

Vice-Pres. Mgr. & Treas. 

MANUFACTURERS Of 



mmmmMmwmmwm 



ITin Cans 

By Automatic Machinery. 

Fruit, Paint, Lard, Baking Powder, Fish, 
and Seamless Lobster 

CANS. 

Capacity, fifty thousand cans per day. 
Sole Agents in Canada for Norton Brothers 

"Solder Hemmed" Caps. 

Inquiries and Correspondence Solicited. 

HAMILTON. - ONT. 



i;fcP-6f:& 






"L ADIES & CHILDREN S 



BOOTS&SHOES 

PREPARED BY-:- 



THEPUREGOLDMANFGCO. 



1E7 



TORONTO ONT.-4* 



mmmmmmmmzm 



To Our 

Grocer Friends : 

GENTLEMEN :— 

We are in the last month of the year ; 
Christmas Holidays with their festivities 
will soon be here, and '92 will soon be 
passed. We will be pleased to have your 
orders by card for any small quantities you 
may require to stock up for Christmas 
trade, and in reference to freight or express 
in transmitting these small amounts you. 
will find us liberal. Let us hear from you as 
you may want. 

And wishing you the compliments of the 
season, 

We remain, 

THE SNOW DRIFT CO., 

BRANTFORD 




We have removed 
to our new premi. 
No. 146 & 148 Car- 
ling St. Call and see 
us when in our City. 

GORMAN, 
ECKERT 

&G0. 

LONDON. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRY A SAMPLE ORDER 

MACLAREN'S 
IMPERIAL 
. CHEESE 

IN GLASS JARS. 

LARGE, MEDIUM and SMALL. 



WRIGHT &COPP 



Dominion Agents, 

TORONTO. 



FRY'S 

Pure Concentrated 

COCOA. 



Is the strongest preparation of Cocoa 
made, and is absolutely pure, without 
flavoring matter or any other ingredi 
ents. 

It is recommended by the highest 
medical authorities for its marvellous 
purity and strength and soluability. 
It is a profitable line to handle. 



The highest grade of Pure Cocoa manufactured. 
For sale by all leading dealers. 

Toronto Office, J. S. FRY & SONS, \\% Wellington St. i 



MARTIN K. EAGAR, 

IBIROiKIIEIR,, 
Importers' and Manufacturers' Agent, 

HALIFAX, N. 



REPRESENTING 



Bensdorps Royal Dutch Cocoa &c, 

C. James & Co., 

Browne, Rosenheim & Co., 

Preservitas Co., 

J. McKittrick, 

Sawyer Blue Co., 

Sanitas Co., 

Ditmars & Weisser, 



London, Eng., 
London, Eng., 
London, Eng., 
Liverpool, Eng., 
Boston, Mass., 
London, Eng., 
Antwerp, 



Pickles, Jams, Etc. 

Teas. 

Food Preservers. 

Green and Dried Fruits. 

Blueing. 

Disenfectants. 

Chicory. 



NOTE — Special attention given to the introduction of New Goods and Consignments. Storage and Advances nude when desired. 

IF YOU WANT A GENUINE SURPRISE 

Ask for Sample of 

JAPAN TEA— at 12 l-2c. f. o. b. Montreal or Toronto. 



IF YOU WANT A BARGAIN 

8 ORDER 

^orto Rico Molasses in Barrels, 32c. 

a 

And whatever you want y^ ' ^an get from 
c 

I Ligktbound, Ralston & Co., 

I Wholesale Grocers, 

I MONTREAL, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



> 



L 



I 




Factories :— Hull, Que. 

Branches :— Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg. 




Vol. VII. 



Published in ti?e interest of (Jroeers, Qanoers, produce and provision Dealers 

and General Storekeepers. 



TORONTO. JANUARY 6, 1893. 



No. I 



J S. McLEAN, 

President. 



HUGHC. McLEAN, 

Sec.-Treas 



THE J. B. McLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

F NE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

AND 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

HEAD OFFICE: - - 10 Front St. E. 

MONTREAL OFFICE : • 146 St. James St. 

E. Desbarats, Manager. 

NEW YORK OFFICE : Room 41, Times Building, 

Roy V. Somervllie, Manager. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH : 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

^Advertisers and Subscribers may ! have their 
correspondence addressed to the care of any of 
our offices and hey are invited to use them at 
any time. At the Head office. Toronto, a place is 
set apart where they can see all the latest news- 
papers and the latest issues of trade papers fiom 
all parts of the world, where they can do their 
correspondence or obtain any information. par- 
cels mav also be directed to the Head office. 



The Grocer opens its Seventh Volume 
with its best wishes to all its su iscnbers for 
a Happy New Year. We are now on the 
threshold of 1893, when its fruits ate more 
largely under our control than they will ever 
be again. We should shape its beginning to 
correspond with the way we desire to end it. 
The trader will find the present a good time 
to renounce some of the habits and methods 
that he has found inimical to his pros- 
perity. We do not recommend him 
to fetter the free play of his discretion by 
the adoption of unalterable rules. The 
breaking of a rule intended to be of cast iron 
inflexibility is demoralizing, and the steady 
observance of one that is adopted on what 
turns out to be mistaken grounds or incom- 
plete knowledge prevents development. 
Begin the year with an open mind, that you 
may extend your knowledge and correct 
misapprehensions, and commit yourself to 
nothing more than general principles. If you 
have given too much credit in the past, 
make up your mind to give less this year, 
but do not rashly resolve that you will credit 
no man. If you have sold at too low a pro- 



fit, keep constantly in the determination to 
realize a fuller margin, but do not take a vow 
that you will never meet a cut. You are 
enlightened by the lessons of last year, but 
there is no reason why you should become 
the slave of last year's experience. One year 
is not all your lifetime ; much less is 
it all time ; none of the knowledge you 
have derived from it or from any other 
year is infinite; you have therefore no war- 
rant for adopting any inflexible rule, as by so 
doing you shut up the avenues of further 
knowledge, and you need to keep all of them 
open. The man who succeeds these days is 
the man of resources, who can promptly 
perceive and choose the course of action 
that suits the spur of the moment. No re- 
solutions, cut and dried at the beginning of 
the year, will provide him w'th the w ; sdom 
necessary for all the exigencies he has to 
face. The most the trader can do now is to 
securely attach himself to the moorings of 
sound general principle. 

* * * 
The Grocer undertakes to do its best to 
further the prosperity it wishes to its read- 
ers in its New Year salutation to them. But 
it also takes occasion to remind some of its 
advertisers that it offers them a resource 
whose potential wealth they do not fully 
extract. An advertisement is not a charm. 
It is a business medium, and its effective- 
ness depends upon the business attention 
it receives. It must always show that 
it is connected with a living original, and 
like every other live thing, it must change. 
The same old familiar card appearing every 
week for a year has all the vitality crushed 
out of it by its oppressive sameness. The 
advertisement needs to be renewed from the 
well-spring of its source in short periods. 
Those who change oftenest reap the most 
benefit. The spontaneous effects of an ad- 
vertisement are not its full or even its best 
effects. The advertiser's space needs inces- 



sant cultivation, otherwise it will grow wild 
and barren. This is particularly true of a 
trade paper, whose readers look upon 
the advertisements as news, and read 
them with interest or with Iangour, 
according as they are fresh or stale. 
The merchant's advertising is a department 
of too much moment to be neglected. He 
looks after his travellers, keeps them in- 
formed by weekly advices of changes, of 
bargains, of special drives, of new arrivals, 
etc., and finds it is necessary to do so in 
order to get full returns from his outlay on 
travellers' account. He looks after his col- 
lections, is cautious about his buying, has 
the best care taken of his books, is careful 
about the selection of his accounts, and gives 
himself a great deal of worry about many 
other interests. But his advertising he too 
commonly neglects. Why ? The reason ap- 
pears to be that many advertisers have not 
a due appreciation of the value of advertis- 
ing. They have not taken note of its growth 
as a modern business force. Its importance 
entitles it to an equal division of the mer- 
chant's administrative care with any of the 
interests mentioned above — travellers, buy- 
ing, book-keeping, or any of the tactics of 
trade. In fact it is the best medium for the 
exercise of business tactics. Therefore, we 
advise our patrons to change their advertise- 
ments often, and study style, effect, and 
originality. The returns will warrant the 
extra thought and labor. The Market Notes 
are a strong supplementary feature to our 
advertising columns, and advertisers should 
make it a point to have something new every 
week in those Notes. Readers always scan 
them with the expectation of finding some- 
thing of special interest to them. 

* ^ * 
* 

The price of sugar, though so far un- 
changed at the refineries or wholesalers, 
shows symptoms of latent strength that may 
culminate in an advance before spring is 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



here. Wholesale grocers who have tendered 
offers for future delivery are unable to place 
their contracts at present prices. The readi- 
ness of wholesalers to buy now on March ac- 
count and the refusal of the refiners to take 
such business are evidences that the funda- 
mental conditions of the market are begin- 
ning to be felt in the prospect for the Cana- 
dian trade. The raw market is very firm 
and would have had its way in affecting the 
price of refined before this but for the influ- 
ence of the Sugar Trust in the United States, 
which keeps the price of refined down that 
it may depress raw, which it is yet buying. 
♦ •* # 

Hamilton merchants are dissatisfied with 
the train service of the G.T.R. from Toronto. 
The cutting off of one forenoon train, which 
the railway company claims was not paying, 
brought the matter before the Board of 
Trade. Hamilton has been rather unfor- 
tunate in its relations with the G. T. R. 
people for some time. Toronto whole- 
salers have likewise complained of the 
limited train accommodation from this city 
to Hamilton. Our merchants found the long 
interval between trains a great inconvenience 
for the holiday trade, when early delivery 
was of paramount importance to retailers 
along that line. The Hamilton Board of 
Trade passed the following resolution : Re- 
solved, after discussion, that in the interests 
of the business of Hamilton Mr. Seargeant 
be respectfully requested to have a passenger 
train put on to run between Toronto and 
Hamilton at some time between 8 a. m. and 
10 30 a. m. each day, to be a local train be- 
tween Oakville and Hamilton, stopping at 
intermediate stations. 

* * * 
The power conferred on the Governor in 
Council by certain clauses in various amend- 
ments to our Tariff Act, authorizing him to 
suspend the duty on sugar and molasses in- 
directly imported, has been exercised. The 
last issue of the Canada Gazette contains 
the proclamations of the Governor- General 
declaring the tariff on indirect importations 
of sugar and molasses to be suspended. We 
can now bring in from the United States, on 
the same footing as from the country of pro- 
duction, eithersugaror molassesthathas been 
imported into that country. Formerly the 
duty on indirect imports of this kind de- 
barred such trade. The addition of one cent 
per gallon to the price of molasses imported 
into this country at second hand of course 
discriminated in favor of direct importation 
from the country of production. The same 
effect resulted from the levying of t; per cent, 
additional upon the price of sugar in- 
directly imported. This duty is suspended 



for two, years. It is supposed that 
this step is taken by the Government 
to remove any cause of irritation that might 
arise from it on the other side of t le border, 
where a good deal of ill nature has been re- 
cently expressed, notably in President Har- 
rison's message, on account of duties that 
appeared to be imposed for the securing 
of our carrying trade for our own 
railway and vessel companies. United 
States importers of sugar and molas- 
ses are therefore as free to sell on this mar- 
ket as the producer in the West Indies. This 
will not affect the price of sugar or molasses 
to the consumer. It will increase the con- 
venience of our own refiners and wholesalers 
and remove a cause of ill feeling between 
Canada and the United States. 
* * * 

For the last six months and more the 
merchants of this city have had to contend 
with great difficulties in the way of doing 
business by telephone. The trolley system 
many a time and oft played havoc with satis- 
factory communication by telephone. Until 
the change from horse cars to electric 
cars is completely effected and all con- 
tact between trolley and telephone wires 
is rendered virtually impossible there 
will continue to be disturbances in the 
conversations between trader and customer. 
The other day the meeting of a telephone 
and a trolley wire destroyed the telephone 
in a Gerrard street grocer's shop. Occasion- 
ally grocers have been distracted by the in- 
cessant ringing of their instruments. One 
grocer informed us that his telephone rang 
in short intermissions all day, and as each 
ring might herald an order, an attendant 
had to answer. It happened that business 
was light that day, and attention to the tele- 
phone was almost needless except to satisfy 
a feeling of uncertainty. Another grocer had 
danced attendance on his telephone so long 
and had proved so many alarms to be false 
that he made up his mind not to go near the 
instrument when it rang, but calmly listen to 
the din until the wavering trolley line should 
be drawn taut and get off his wire. The 
next day he was pretty badly overhauled by 
an irate customer for not attanding to the 
telephone. 

* * * 

If the merchants in the vicinity of the St. 
Lawrence Market in this city adhere to the 
idea they are reported to entertain, namely, 
to form a company and buy the market fees 
for the current year and then exempt the 
farmers from the payment of fees, they will 
show a rare example of courage and of com- 
mercial spirit that is deserving of admira- 
tion. The few cents that each farmer has to 
pay with each entry he makes to the market 
amounts to but little to the individual outsi- 
ders upon whom it falls, but they feel it more, 
and probably pay it more grudgingly than 
these few merchants among whom it would 
be divided, according to the rumoured pur- 
pose. 



PUBLICATIONS NOTICED. 

Among the many Christmas numbers 
issued this year, that of the Canadian Miller 
is worthy of selection for special mention 
It is a very prosperous looking production, 
and the attractiveness of its appearance is 
fully equalled by its merit. 

The Fruit Trade Journal, New York, 
brings its volume for 1892 to a close in a fine 
Christmas number, of which a copy has been 
received at this office. The outward appear- 
ance of the number is tasteful, and its con- 
tents are excellent. The Journal is a most 
useful auxiliary to the fruit trade. 

My Little Story is the title of a hand- 
somely covered, well printed, finely illus- 
trated pamphlet, and the tale which fills it 
up is an interesting one for traders to read. 
It is the story of how Theodore Heinrichs, 
retail druggist, Baltimore, Md., systematized 
his business. The means by which this end 
was accomplished was a National Cash Re- 
gister, and how great a part this guardian of 
a trader's cash capital can play in his pros- 
perity may be learned from a perusal of this 
story. It is pretty sure to set the reader 
thinking, and to give him an insight into the 
principle of this mechanism of economy that 
will lead to its adoption, if it is not already 
in the trader's service. 

The Toronto Biscuit and Confectionery 
Co. are distributing copies of their Cabinet 
Calendar fortbe current year. This Calendar 
contains a very catchy feature in the group 
of Ontario's cabinet Ministers it presents. 
The interest of observers is certain to be 
drawn to this picture, as all the portraits in 
it are true to life and well brought out. The 
large number of people who never saw the 
members of Sir Oliver Mowat's Government 
will be sure to scan this Calendar, which 
therefore is a good one to have hanging up 
in one's stote. 

We have received a copy of the pro- 
gramme which is to be the framework of 
the proceedings of the annual convention of 
the Creameries Association to be held at 
Harriston, Ont., on Wednesday, Thursday 
and Friday of next week. Among those who 
will furnish papers for discussion are Prof. 
Robertson, Ottawa, Prof. Shutt, Guelph, 
Prof. Dean, Guelph, Ex. Gov. Hoard, Fort 
Atkinson, Wis., A. Wenger, Ayton, Ont., 
John S. Pearce, London, Ont., M Moyer, 
Toronto, Hon. John Dryden. 

The New York Daily Commercial Bulletin 
comes to hand at the beginning of the year 
with one column more to the page. The 
eight extra columns by which it is enlarged is 
equivalent to the addition of one of its pre- 
sent pages. The breadth of the paper is 
now nearly equal to its length. This is an 
improvement in the proportions of the paper, 
each page presenting a very compact ap- 
pearance. We are glad to see that our emi- 
nent contemporary has to make more room 
to accommodate increasing business. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TWO PICTURES— CASH AND 
CREDIT. 

CASH. 
The night was dark and stormy, as I, 
wrapt up in my furs, walked briskly along 
through the cold blinding sleet up Yonge 
street. The street was almost entirely de- 
serted ; hardly a soul could be seen from the 
foot of it to the very top, that is as far as you 
could see. It was too miserable a night to 
be out, a night which no one who had a 
home would leave it unless it was impossible 
to help it, and I myself felt as if I did not 
care how soon I reached my destination. I 
was on my way to visit a triend of mine, by 
name Tom Lee. Tom was a friend of mine. 
He was a retail grocer, which business he 
had been in for the last eight years. He 
did a large business, but the bulk of it was 
done on credit, and at the end of five years 
he found, after taking stock and summing up 
everything, that he had spent that five years 
for the benefit of the customers and not him- 
self. Thereupon he decided to sell for cash 
and cash only ; if they did not pay the cash 
when they came for the goods, the goods 
would stay on the shelves ; he was deter- 
mined to see either the goods or the money. 
So for the past three years Tom had sold for 
cash. He was a genial fellow, whole-souled 
and whole-hearted, just the kind of a com- 
panion for a night like this. I dont care 
how low your temperature had gone down, 
his bright, warm smile and cheery voice 
would make you forget that it was cold out- 
side. Yes, sir, he has sometimes actually 
made me forget that I had not had my din- 
ner. So different now to what it used to be 
when he used to sell on credit. Then he 
would look thin and careworn and full of 
anxiety, and when I have asked him what is 
the matter he has told me that he had a 
large note to meet on the morrow and 
had sent his man out to collect, and 
he had only brought in about five dol- 
lars instead of about five hundred. When 
in sympathy I have clapped him on the 
back and told him to cheer up, the darkest 
cloud was a silvery lining still, he used to 
say, " You don't know anything about it. It 
drives me wild. I am distracted. If this 
thing lasts much longer it will drive me cra- 
iy ; I can't stand it. Here the wholesale 
men will be after that note, and I can't pay 
it. If I had only had my own I would be all 
right and would go on swimming." Think- 
ing over these things I at last reached the 
house in which he lived. Stepping up to the 
door I knocked, and almost immediately the 
door was opened and I don't think I will ever 
forget the warm flood of light which burst 
upon my bev lldered eyes. If ever there was 
a sense of home comfort came over a man, 
it came over me then and there. The large 
hanging lamp burned brightly in the hall, 
reflecting a cheerful gleam all along the 
hall to the sitting room ; indeed it was so 
bright that it dazzled my eyes so that it took 



me some little time before I could see the 
bright happy face of the little maiden who 
opened the door. It was Tom's child, 
Mabel. She had one of the sweetest faces 
I think I ever saw. It was beaming like a 
ray of sunshine. Looking up into my eyes 
she bade me welcome, and such a welcome ! 
It was a downright sweet honest childlike 
welcome. Taking a hold of me by the hand 
with her soft velvety one, " Come in, Mr. 

C ," she said, and the bright happy voice 

sent a thrill of real pleasure and delight 
through me which I will not soon forget. 
The bright sweet sound of her voice sent 
harmony speeding through my veins like 
some sweet strain of heavenly music. No 
need to go any further to be able to tell that 
all were happy here. The beaming face of 
the child told the tale. It was a perfect 
index to the happiness, peace and comfort 
which reigned within. As soon as I could 
regain my voice I asked her if her father 
was in, and being answered in the affirma- 
tive she led me in her ci lidlike way into 
the sitting room where he was. Memory 
will often recall that sight. Cosy 
was no name for it. The floor was 
covered with a fine thick Brussels carpet, 
and there in an easy rocker sat the man 
himself, Tom, toasting his toes before the 
ruddy fire, one of the grate fires. Indeed it 
was grateful on a night like this. There he 
sat like a king and monarch of all he sur- 
veyed, reading the evening papers, with his 
big black dog Hero lying at his feet, and his 
other little girl Lilly in his arms, with her 
head nestled cosily on his breast, perfectly 
at peace. In the centre of the room stood 
the table, over which a bright shade lamp 
shed its soft light, beside which sat his wile, 
darning little stockings for busy pattering 
feet. At her feet on the rug lay the purring 
cat. One look at the face of the wife con- 
firmed the impression previously made by 
the face of the child. All was peace and 
happiness here. If ever there was a picture 
of home comfort, here was one. " Well, 
Tom," I could not help exclaiming, " if you 
are not the very picture of unalloyed happi- 
ness, I don't know where I will find one." 
" I guess you are right," he said. " That's 
what I'm living for, and that is what we are 
here for. It ain't our fault if we are not. I 
guess that the wife and me are just about as 
happy and comfortable as you can find them. 
Eh ! what do you say, wife ?" " Well," she 
said, " I don't think I could be much hap- 
pier if I tried. You see, Mr. C , Tom 

sells for cash now ; and it is so different to 
what it used to be. Before he did twice the 
business, and had twice the worry and three 
times the anxiety, and then he did not get 
half his money in, and he never was sure of 
being able to meet his payments, because 
when he most expected it and most needed 
it, that was the time he would be disappoint- 
ed, and he would come home at night and 
could not sleep, but now he comes home 
straight from business ; he doesn't do half 



the work, but makes more money, has a 
clear and contented mind, comes home 
happy and amuses the children ; he comes 
straight home at night after work, takes off 
his boots, puts on his slippers, squats him- 
self in the rocker with Lilly or Mabel on his 
knee and Hero at his feet, reads the paper, 
tells us all the news, he gets well rested for 
morning, and we have all the necessaries of 
life and all that heart could desire ; and in 
case of sickness, why he has three thousand 
dollars laid away in the bank that we can 
fall back upon any time, a thing that he 
never would have had if he had continued 
selling on credit. Then again his life is in- 
sured, so if anything happens we are pre- 
pared for any emergency. If every grocer 
would do like Tom does, there would be few 
if any unhappy homes, and there would be 
fewer sick wives and children in the world. 
He don't drink, chew or smoke, and he is 
always at home and with his family when he 
is not at work. He lives a good clean life, 
inwardly and outwardly. Do you know, it 
is often a wonder to me how men can go and 
fill themselves up with rank -poison and then 
expect their wives and children to be happy 
and healthy. It's a wonder to me that some 
of them live as long as they do. Yes, Mr. 

C , Tom's happy, the children are happy, 

the cat and dog are happy, and I'm happy, 
and it's selling for cash has done the whole 

thing." 

(To be continued.) 



THE BROOM CORN COMBINE. 

A marked advance in the price of broom 
corn, which seems certain to come almost 
immediately, affords a striking instance of 
the lengths to which a trust or combination 
will go in spite of the economic law of supply 
and demand, says the New York Times. 
The crop this year has been an immense one, 
larger by many hundred tons than that of 
last year, and yet the Chicago dealers, who 
practically control the market, have formed 
a combination and obtained a corner on the 
crop. 

The dealers of Quincy street, Chicago,who 
handle nearly nine-tenths of the whole out- 
put of the United States, are at the bottom 
of the combination, and they intend to ad- 
vance prices as much as they can. The pro- 
posed increase is 30 per cent on all grades, 
and notice of an advance to that extent has 
been served by an organization of broom 
manufacturers at Milwaukee. 

The rise in prices will be felt immediately 
throughout the country, and will be a boon 
to many retail dealers of this city who have 
large stocks on hand. 

No one acquainted with the trade doubts 
the ability of the Chicago combine to bring 
about a large advance in prices. They have 
large capital behind them, and a similar trust 
formed about two years ago managed to 
secure an increase in price of $2 per 100. 
The present prices range from $4 50 to $6. 
according to the quality. Combinations 
similar to the one now said to be organized 
have sometimes raised prices to $12 per 100. 
— N. Y, Grocer. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



FRAUDS IN PEPPER AND GINGER. AFFABILITY OF STORE-KEEPERS. 



As so-called ground black pepper is still 
being extensively sold, at prices which are 
simply impossible, except at a heavy loss, or 
unless the commodity is not what it professes 
to be, it is well for the grocers to be on their 
guard. The lowest market cost price of 
wSole light dusty Penang, which is the poor- 
est quality that can be ground, is 2^d. per 
lb. The lowest cost of grinding with loss 
on warrant weights and putting into barrels, 
is %d. per lb. The lowest ground pepper 
must thus actually cost the wholesale dealer 
3#d. per lb. Allowing #d. per lb. for the 
dealer's profits, this pepper could not be 
sold under 3#d. Such a quality is quite 
unfit for table use, and is only suitable for 
manufacturing purposes. In the same way, 
the lowest Penang white pepper now costs, 
after the recent fall, 3#d. per lb. The cost 
of grinding, loss of weight, and barrels, is 
%d. per lb., the loss in weight being heavier 
than with black pepper. This would bring 
the first cost up to 4/^d., or, allowing #d. 
lor the dealer's profit, to 4#d. per lb. Both 
in black and in whits peppers it is notorious 
that far lower prices than the above are cur- 
rent. In some cases the opportunity for 
actual comparison is given by the quotation 
of the lowest pepper, whole, at a consider- 
ably higher price than the simultaneous offer 
for ground pepper. Everyone knows that 
ground pepper must inevitably cost more 
than whole. The question therefore arises 
of how the natural state of things can be re- 
versed. 

It is to be hoped at a time when there is 
so strong an agitation for the improvement 
of the Adulteration Acts, that the grocers 
will support the legitimate wholesale trade, 
and refuse to encourage such a disreputable 
system of trading. The case of ginger is 
even worse, now that its place is being so 
extensively taken by the refuse of ginger, 
beer making. The grocers might, from th 
point of view of the law, just as well sell ex- . 
hausted tea leaves for tea, as much of the \ 
so-called ground ginger that is now being 
offered. The worst of the matter is that 
price is not so direct a guide with spent 
ginger as it is in the case of the lowest 
pepper, for the operation with the former 
goes further. It is well known to the whole- 
sale trade that spent ginger is not only 
fraudulently mixed with common qualities, 
but with the better qualities as well, in order ■ 
to obtain an illegitimate profit. With the""* 
lower sorts, however, it must be clear to 
anyone that genuine ground ginger cannot 
be sold below the cost of the raw roots, in- 
asmuch as the cost of grinding and barrels 
is 8s. per cwt. Nor can bogus guarantees of 
quality or warranties excuse a respectable 
trader in his own eyes from buying such 
commodities. With the higher-priced ginger 
the fraud is less easy to detect, though the 
palate at once shows any extensive adultera- 
tion. — Produce Markets' Review. 



The Commercial Inquirer in a rather 
lengthy article on the personality of the 
shopkeeper says : 

The personality of the storekeeper has 
much to do with the results of his business 
ventures. 

Men and women are creatures of impulse, 
of emotions, for the most part, and the wise 
man not only knows this but profits by his 
knowledge. 

Every grocer knows the main object he 
has in view in conducting his business is the 
making of money, and to this object every- 
thing else should be made subservient so 
long as the principles of integrity are not 
violated. Hence, the chief question is — 
What pays best ? There's big money in 
smiles. A big stock of them kept where 
they can be drawn upon for any and all oc- 
casions is the most profitable stock a rner- 
chent can possess. 

To some they came cheap. Some men 
are "built" so good natured and agreeable 
that a merry twinkle of the eye, a cheery 
smile and pleasant manner are their natural 
characteristics. Such men have a stock in 
trade worth more to them than a money in- 
heritance. Others must acquire a pleasant 
address, and although a difficult operation it 
pays large dividends. It's astonishing what 
a multitude of errors a smile will cover ; 
how many rough places a pleasing manner 
can smooth over ; how many offended cus- 
tomers a cheerful reception can make good 
umored. 

Cultivate a jolly disposition, and you'll not 
only make it pay handsomely but you'll get 
lots of fun out of it. Think of an irate cus- 
tomer coming with a rush into your store 
with a grievance — real or fancied — and de- 
termined to give you a " roasting" and then 
to withdraw his trade. You've seen him no 
doubt. Now, how will you meet him ? If 
you get mad, he's got the best of you, be- 
cause he's been mad so much longer that 
his anger has got his mouth into good work- 
ing shape for abusiveness. But keep cool, 
listen to his complaint, show him you are 
ready to correct any error even if he's the 
one that made it, and get him off on to some 
amusing "string," and you'll have him good 
natured in spite of himself, and he'll leave 
the store laughing and determined that all 
the groceries his family uses shall come from 
your store. 

" I'll never go to that store again," has 
been the expression of many a woman who 
has met with a curt response to her inquiry. 
A lady entered a store and neglected to en- 
tirely close the door. On asking for the first 
article wanted — which in this case happened 
to be macaroni — the grocer replied : " The 
first thing is to shut the door." That was 
the last time she ever had occasion to either 
open or shut that store door, whereas cour- 
teous treatment would have made her a fre- 
quent purchaser. 



NEW YEAR ADVICE. 

The season goes by, the season comes back, 

The strength of the earth to renew ; 
The Summer is past, the New Year's come 

'round, 
With music and laughter, and shuffle and 
sound — 
But there's business, boy all the year 
through. 

There is business for us in the stern demands 

Demands that forever renew 
In industry's calls from the asking lands, 
Whose acres are waiting for toil's clever 
hands, 

For more than they're willing to do. 

Life's valleys are gleaming with rivers of sin — 

Temptation's flowers charming toview — 

The siren walks there, where charming she's 

been 
Since Eden went out and temptation came 
in; 
Stand guard, boy, she,s watching for 
you. 

There's businees for all in this world, my boy 
Though some folks find nothing to do ; 
And misery will, misery forever enhance 
With him who is satisfied fortune is charce, 
And only may come to a few. 

Who waiteth tor fortune is waiting for grapes 
In a desert where grapes never grew ; 
A beggar that sitteth where nobody goes, 
An idler for gold where no gold ever flows — 
There's no business there, boy for you. 

Who boreth for water must not expect oil, 
Nor for gold if for silver he sue ; 

If sleepeth the husbandman, sleepeth the 
soil, 

And harvest refuseth the product of toil 

Wake up, boy ! there's business for you. 

Be true to your manhood, work up in the line 
To wisdom's line — close as you can — 

With axe, plow and harrow, for hillside and 
plain ; 

And pen, ink and paper to plow for the brain, 
Fulfill the grand purpose of man ! 

This brief of existence is business my boy, 

For other more lasting in view ; 
Life can't be a shadow that struts, frets and 

dies, 
Where heaven, great heaven, looks down 
thro' such eyes ; 
Look up, God is smiling on you ! 

Then work while 'tis day, ere cometh the 
night, 
Be quick, boy, the moments are few ; 
Eschew ye the evil, defend ye the right, 
Work out of the darkness up into the light, 
Where the world has business for you ! 

—Ex. 



The proposal to ask legislative power to 
exempt personal property from taxation in 
this city was voted on and defeated on 
Thursday. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 







THE secret of successful advertising is to make 
the advertisement as interesting as the editorial 
page, or the Market Reports. Change it regu- 
larly, put life in it and you will soon discover why ad- 
vertising pays. Is i^ not worth a trial ? Tell your 
customers and probable buyers through your advertise- 
ment what your travellers would tell them, and see the 
difference in the results. Our subscribers tell us that 
they read the advertisements that are changed regularly 
with as much interest as any part of the paper, because 
they contain much valuable information of new goods, 
where they may be had and of changes in prices. 



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THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRAVELLERS' ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the Commercial 
Travellers' Association of Canada was 
li.hl in Toronto the 29th nit- The fol- 
lowing are the officers for the new year: 
President, John Burns; first vice-presi- 
dent, Robert H. Gray; second vice-presi- 
dent. James Haywood ; board of directors, 
Joseph Kilgour, W. B. Dack, M. C. Ellis, 
John Everett, C. C. Kyle, T. P. Hayes 
George E. Hamilton, John A. Ross, John 
Orr. The total number of votes cast were 
1.2S2. 

The following resolution proposed by 
Mr. Fielding and seconded by Mr. Orlando 
Potter, wa6 submitted : That the board 
of directors be asked to offer three prizes 
to members of this association for eBsays 
written on the subject of dating invoices 
forward beyond the season when the 
goods are required by the retail merchant' 
the first prize to be, say, $40, the second 
$20, the third $10, the writer to be a 
bona fide traveller at the time engaged 
in selling goods on the road, and to make 
a declaration that he is the composer and 
author of said paper and the facts gath- 
ered from experience on the road. Mr. 
Fielding, speaking to his motion, said he 
was strongly of the opinion that the asso- 
ciation should encourage the discussion of 
commercial questions at its meetings, 
rather than spending so much time in 
purely association work. He thought com- 
mercial travellers might do much towards 
improving the business of the houses they 
represent if they would discuss with and 
offer suggestions to their employers as to 
how the business of the house might be 
improved. The question of long credit was 
one of the most important in business>and 
he was confident that all would agree 
with him that it was of paramount im- 
portance to endeavor to transact busi- 
ness as nearly as possible on a cash basis- 
They could not expect increase of salary 
if the profits of the year did not warrant 
it, and it was surely time that the trav- 
ellers made some effort to discourage the 
practice of selling at long dates. Mr. 
Fielding's remarks gave rise to a short 
but spirited discussion. Mr. Hayes op- 
posed the suggestion that the association 
should offer prizes for such essays, and 
protested against the odium of long credit 
being placed on the travellers. He was 
confident that the travellers did their best 
to discourage them. Mr. Fielding said 
that a friend of his had told him that 
if the association declined to take the mat- 
ter up he would himself offer $100 for the 
best essay on the subject. 

Mr. W. E. Ellis took strong objection to 
any such course. He was sure all of them 
were as anxious to reduce business trans- 
actions to as near a cash basis as the 
merchants were» but he thought the mat- 
ter rested with them and not with their 
travellers. 

Mr. Warring Kennedy supported Mr. 
Ellis, and remarked that the question was 
one of great difficulty, i The Toronto 
houses were largely forced to these long 
credits by competition with Montreal and 
with English and Scotch firms, who all 
gave long dates. But he thought that 
whatever was done should be initiated by 
the merchants themselves. Mr. Fielding 
withdrew his motion. 



MERCANTILE CREDITS. 

The question of mercantile credits is one 
that should command the attention and 
thoughtful interest of all who are engaged in 
banking, commercial, manufacturing or other 
pursuits in which operations of a greater or 
less magnitude are largely based on confi- 
dence, and although there is no feature of 
any business more prominent as a factor in 
its success or failure, or more difficult ot suc- 
cessful management, it is a fact that there 
exists less general knowledge upon the subject 
than upon other questions of equal import- 
ance, and upon no question of such daily 
and ever present contract is so little written. 

The present system of mercantile credits 
as practically applied, has developed in re- 
cent years to a great extent, and there may 
now be found in the leading business con- 
cerns and manufacturing establishments of 
the country an organized and completely 
equipped credit department, upon which 
rests the responsibility of avoiding losses by 
bad debts — a source of serious danger that 
is a constant menace, and one that is not in- 
frequently the "hidden rock" upon which 
some unfortunate commercial craft is hope- 
lessly wrecked. 

The successful credit man should be an 
apt student of human nature, possessed of 
natural tact, which, combined with the ele- 
ment of caution in a fair degree, and good 
judgment ripened by experience, enables 
him to "steer clear" and avoid more than 
a reasonable share of losses by bad debts. 
He must have the benefits of a training and 
experience that no other field affords ; be 
well informed on general topics ; and keep 
posted as to the success or failure of import- 
ant interests in all sections in which his 
house is doing business. He must investi- 
gate and study the cause and movement of 
"booms," and their effect on the locality 
directly affected, always keeping a weather 
eye of watchful solicitude on accounts in 
such localities, opening no new accounts 
with dealers who are inclined to speculation, 
or whose interests are likely to be adversely 
affected by the changed conditions. Like- 
wise, he must be alive to possible unfavor- 
able changes in the condition of all custo- 
mers of the house, and especially so in cases 
where sudden disaster or depression occurs, 
whether from strikes, epidemics, floods, poor 
crops or other causes, and can often show 
commendable ability by the prompt applica- 
tion of tact and judicious management in 
"getting out" safely from threatened and 
impending failures. 

Another feature of equal importance with 
that of the credits is the proper management 
of the Collections, and in the leading houses 
this branch is under the charge and general 
direction of the Credit Department, which 
gives special attention to the slow and un- 
satisfactory accounts, in which f.eld there are 
frequent daily opportunities for the exercise 



of tact and shrewdness, which are necessary 
to escape serious losses. 

The duties devolving on the credit depart- 
ment are laborious and exacting, beginning 
with the opening of business, and in no de- 
partment is there required a greater amount 
of close and intelligent application, or where 
the quick exercise of goodjudgment isoftener 
demanded, as well as the absolute necessity 
of a constant unflagging systematic vigilance. 
— J. S. C. in American Grocer. 



THREE ESSENTIALS. 

Too many grocerymen in small places fail 
to adopt city methods simply because they 
think it is not possible to do so in a small 
way. This is a mistake. Allow us to make 
three suggestions. 

i. Keep your store room and stock in the 
most attractive form, clean and neat. If you* 
stock is well and attractively displayed, youi 
shelves, counters, windows and floor scrupu- 
lously clean, your trade will be increased. 

2. Keep a "want" book of articles about to 
run out, and especially of those brands 
most in demand, so that you can order 
promptly when the traveling salesman comes* 
in, or to mail to the wholesale dealer. 

3. Keep a cheap or job lot counter on 
which to display such goods as have not sold 
readily ; mark them down to cost and call 
attention to them through advertising, and 
also of customers when in your place of busi- 
ness. It does not pay to hold stock that is 
not salable. — Los Angeles Journal. 



HOW TO CHOOSE ORANGES. 

The expert orange buyer does not select 
the smooth, clean-skinned fruit invariably, 
nor does he object to a heavy percentage of 
rough, dirty skins. The latter are not al 
ways easy to sell, but they invariably give 
the greatest satisfaction. This is because in 
the case of oranges, as with almost any fruit, 
beauty is only skin deep, and the insects 
which infest orange groves and extract 
sweetness from the fruit much as bees draw 
honey from the finest flowers, only attack 
the sweetest and choicest to be found. The 
effect of their efforts is to roughen the skin 
by perforating it, and hence dust is retained, 
instead of either falling or being brushed off 
the untouched skins. The fruit within the 
latter having been rejected by the insects on 
account of the lack ot sweetness is not so 
palatable as that in the rougher looking skins; 
and it is decidedly a good plan to follow in 
the foot-steps of the busy little creatures who 
can tap an orange and ascertain how sweet 
it is in a manner no man could attempt. — 
The American Analyst. 



The annual concert of the Commercial 
Travellers' Circle was held in Association 
Hall, Toronto, on Thursday evening. A 
very superior class of entertainment was pro- 
vided for by the programme and fully ren- 
dered by the participants. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE MONTREAL TRAVELLERS' 
DINE. 

The annual jollification of the -Domin- 
ion Commercial Travellers' Association 
took place at the Windsor Hotel in Mont- 
real on Thursday last, and as usual the 
knights of the gripsack had a regular 
old-fashioned good time- Two hundred 
sat down, there being seven tables be- 
sides the long guest table for the big guns 
which ran the full length of the south 
inside of the big hall. The decorations were 
tasteful as usuab and an efficient orches- 
tra discoursed a choice selection of mel- 
odies to aid the digestion of the good 
things. 

^ The committee who had charge of the 
dinner may well be congratulated on its 
success, and all of them— Mr. G. W. L. 
Cains, tJhe chairman, and Messrs. Fred 
Birks, W. H. Callahan J. W. Clark,. E. H. 
Copeland, F. S. Cote, M. E. Davis, J. T. 
Dwyer, Geo. Forbes, Wm. Galbraith, F. 
Gormley, E. E. Guilbault, Fred Hughes, 
E. D. Marceau, J. H. Morin, E. G. Pain- 
chaud, Win. Percival, John Rogers, John 
Taylor, L. A. Wilson and H. W. Wads- 
worth, the secretary— deserved the con- 
gratulations they had received. 

President elect Cains saw that matters 
did not drag, and hi dazzling shirt front 
was the focus from which all things radi- 
ated for the nonce. Assisted by the soft 
glow of the electric lights and the other 
shirt fronts it cast a pleasing reflection 
over every visage, and as there were pre- 
sumably no dyspeptics present the gen- 
eral effect was gratifying beyond descrip- 
tion. The chairman was supported on 
his left by his worship the Mayor, and 
Solicitor-General Curran was on the 
right. The other guests were Lieut.-Col. 
Stevenson, United States Consul-General 
Knapp, Edgar Judge, Judge A. H. Chat- 
tain, corporation counsel of Chicago ; N. 
J. Power, general passenger agent, Grand 
Trunk railway ; Thomas W. Blair, Inter- 
colonial railway ; J. H. Copeland» Chas. 
Gurd, David Watson, James .J Carmody, 
T. Simmons, Wm. Buell, W. Percival, F. 
.H Dent, H. W. Wadsworth and J. ,E. 
Wright, many of the guests being at the 
vice-chairmen's tables, which were pre- 
sided over by Messrs. John Rogers, L. A. 
Wilson, J. N. Morin, W. H. Callahan, E. 
D. Marceau, George Forbes, and De 
Grandpre. 

Among tine others who sent their re- 
grets were His Excellency Lord Stanley, 
Governor-General ; Sir John Thompson. 
Sir Donald A. Smith, Hon. J. A. Chapleau, 
Hon. Wilfrid Laurier, Mr. A. T. Lepine, 
M.P.; Hon. L. O. Taillon, Hon. J. S. Hall, 
Hon. A. W. Morris, M.L.A.; Mr. O. M. 
Auge, .ML. A.; the presidents of the Board 
of Trade and Chambre of Commerce ; the 
Mayor of Portland, president Maine as- 
sociation, secretary Maine association, 
and Hon. W. H. Looney, Messrs. J. H. 
Dow and M. J. Pickering, of Portland, 
and presidents of sister associations in 
Canada. 

After the usual loyal toast of the 
Queen had been drunk with full honors, 
telegrams of kindly greeting were read 
from the London association, the Toronto 
association, and from Mr. Fred Birks, 
their last secretary, and from twenty ab- 
sent brothers, regretting they could not 
attend. 

The toast of His Excellency followed, 
and then the President of the United 
States was not forgotten, although the 



present occupant is not the one Canadians 
just exactly like. But defeat is a gall- 
ing thing, and the drummers were will- 
ing to receive him, and when Consul-Gen- 
eral Knapp rose to respond amid the con- 
cluding strains of " The Star-Spangled 
Banner," his reception was too enthusi- 
siastic to leave any doubts in the minds 
of any American visitor as to the feelings 
of the boys towards their cousins across 
the border, no matter what disgruntled 
office-holders might do. The Consul-Gen- 
eral, after returning thanks for the invi- 
tation, said that the commercial travel- 
lers of Montreal were an honor to their 
calling and to the Dominion. He was 
glad to be able to say also that since he 
was their guest two years ago they had 
increased in numbers from 2,100 to 2,400 
and now had a surplus of $12,500. He 
was very grateful for the grand manner 
in which they had received the name of 
his honored chief, the President of the 
United States ; it showed that there was 
the best of good will between the two 
countries, and it would always be 
hoped , continue so. For evidence is ad- 
vancing that commerce, more than ever 
before, is the means of bringing closer to- 
gether the two countries, and the com- 
mercial traveller is one of the classes who 
is doing much towards this. Canada and 
the United States are kindred countries. 
The people of both are joined together to 
make two great nations and we can join 
in singing together "Hail Columbia" and 
"God Save the Queen." 

Judge Chattain responded to the toast 
to "Our American Cousins," in a very 
able speech, which was greeted with 
cheers from time to time. In opening he 
said that this was an industrial age. and 
a complex one, but the voice of the seri- 
ous people of the United States Avas not 
in favor of annexation, as we think there 
is plenty of room on this continent north 
of Mexico for two great nations. Fine 
economic questions may often come be- 
fore us that may cause excitement for a 
while, but if these questions are kept 
away from political demagogy and left 
to the commercial interests to settle 
there will be no trouble. The commercial 
spirit of England has made it the great 
nation that it is. It was that spirit 
that brought up the supremacy of its 
army and navy. It was that same spirit 
that has made Montreal the great city 
it is to-day. It was the same spirit that 
permitted Chicago to secure the World's 
Fair. 

In proposing the toast of the commer- 
cial interests ol Canada. Vice-President 
Morin remarked tihat although the past 
two years had not been all that they 
should be, he felt sure the year they were 
just entering would bring better things. 
He called on Mr. Judge to respond. 

Mr. Judge did so in his usual eloquent 
manner. He said it was always custom- 
ary at this dinner that an officer of the 
Board of Trade should reply, and he re- 
gretted that they had not called upon a 
more able speaker. As the vice-president 
had said, trade was not as bright just 
now as it should be. and bankers were 
not having big balances. In speaking of 
the commercial interests of Canada. Mr. 
Judge said he could look back to the time 
when the dinner did not exist, and in 
conclusion said he could heartily praise 
the travellers for being among the fore- 
most to open up the country and there- 
by develop it. 

Mr. L. A. Wilson in proposing the toast 
of the forwarding interests, dwelt upon 
the consideration with which the com- 
mercial travellers had been treated by 
them. Mr. Poirier resonded in appropri- 
ate terms, expressing th© sincere hope 
that a feeling of amity would always 



exist between commercial travellers and 
the forwarding companies. 

The sister associations, by Mr. George 
Forbes, followed, calling for a few re- 
marks in response by Mr. D. Morton, of 
New York, and Mr. John Rogers propos- 
ed "Our Gueste." In referring to the rail- 
road 'men he called upon them for that 
" little two cents," which hit the boys 
right where they lived, for it was greet- 
ed with prolonged cheers. 

The first guest to rise in response was 
the Hon. J. J. Curran. who was greeted 
with hearty applause, and started in by 
saying that this was not the first time 
he had been their guest, but on this oc- 
casion he had a greater pleasure in being 
with them, especially on account of the 
way in which they had greeted his name 
and the honored chieftain who had seen 
fit to promote him. Mr. Curran made a 
very patriotic speech on Canada as a na- 
tion. As his chief had been referred to, 
he might say that even if Sir John 
Thompson had retired to the Supreme 
Bench he would have been able to show 
the commercial interests that his name 
was uot unknown in acts to their bene- 
benefit. The Banks and Banking Act. the 
Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes 
Act. and last but not least, the Criminal 
Code of 1892, which protected not only 
the commercial interests, but the homes 
and families of Canadians, and was a per- 
fect work of statesmanship from begin- 
ning to end, must be credited to him. 
Then the speaker referred to the United 
States, hot in a derogatory way, but 
as a nation of whom we were proud to 
be friends, but at the same time were 
not .afraid of. This was greeted with 
cheers. 

The "Army and Navy and Volunteers." 
"The Ladies" and "The Press" followed, 
calling for speeches from Lieut.-Col. Stev- 
enson, W. H. Callahan, and E. D. Mar- 
ceau, and the gathering broke up in the 
wee isma' hours with " God Save the 
Queen." 



BUSINESS FAILURES IN CANADA. 

In the Dominion of Canada, including 
Newfoundland, the total number of failures 
reported for 1892 is 1,682, a decrease of 9 
per cent, compared with the preceding year. 
The decline in volume of liabilities, how- 
ever, is much heavier, from $14,884,000 to 
$11,603,000, or 22 per cent. Increases in 
number of failures are reported from Nova 
Scotia, Manitoba and British Columbia, 
where gross liabilities of those failing are 
likewise large as compared with 1891. On- 
tario and Quebec each show a gratifying re- 
duction in the number of business failures, 
together with gross liabilities. 

The report of failures in the Dominion to 
Bradstreet's this year and last in detail is as 
follows : 

No. of 
Failures. Liabilities. 

1892. 1891. 1892. 1W1. 

Ontario 716 843 $3,652,959 $5,371,000 

Quebec 665 680 6,273,547 7,538,000 

New Brunswick... 85 93 549,002 599,000 

NovaScotia 153 122 956,830 691,000 

Prince Ed ward I'd 8 10 113,000 106,000 

Newfoundland.... 3 7 37,000 96,000 

Manitoba 62 51 517,400 340,000 

N. W. Territories. 16 17 51,521 159,000 

British Columbia. 71 23 452,461 81,000 

Total 1,682 1,816 $11,603,210 $14,884,000 

The total number of failures for 1892 in- 
cludes three from St. Pierre and Miquion. — 
Bradstreet's. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CO-OPERATION AND BUSINESS 
PROFITS. 

Attempts at co-operation thus far have 
generally shown a strong if not fatal tend- 
ency to failure because of the difficulty of 
commanding the requisite skill and faithful- 
ness in management. Co-operators are not 
willing to pay the price for service which 
their business needs in order to succeed 
They always stand on the theory that the 
men who conduct great enterprises get too 
mucb tor doing the business and operatives 
too little. In course of time, and usually not 
very long time, their scheme goes down. 
This is because in the nature of things no 
hired person on a salary of fixed amount will 
all the time keep his wits alive and study 
into the small hours of the night devising 
ways and means to make money for other 
people. They propose in their constitution 
to take from capital and skill a portion of 
the profit that has usually been accorded to 
them and give it to labor; but afterthousands 
of experiments during forty or more years of 
good business in this country there is hardly 
a single case of such undoubted success as 
to warrant the assertion that demonstration of 
feasibility has been attained. The combined 
skill of all the co-operators in half a century 
has produced no concern of magnitude. The 
almost uniform failures seem to prove that 
great management must have great com- 
pensation, and in endeavoring to get the 
skill without the pav the co-operators 1 dream 
has come to naught. 

Now, this is equivalent to saying that the 
wirld finds its business can be done at less 
cost than by co-operation. The latter fails 
because it is undersold and unable to com- 
pete with such skill as gets the better pay. 
Had Commodore Vanderbilt been content 
with the salary of a steamboat captain he 
would never have developed into a great 
business man and railroad manager. The 
prospect of great emolument brought into 
exercise great powers, so that he cheapened 
transportation to an astonishing degree and 
yet made money to an astonishing amount. 
The people who saved four or five dollars in 
a round trip between Boston and New York, 
and the people who got their barrel of flour 
twenty-five cents less because he ran a rail- 
way to Chicago, enjoyed the sensation at that 
time, but, when they saw his fortune, could 
not refrain from tears to think of the merci- 
less robbery they suffered at his hands. The 
thing happened and succeeded, not because 
Vanderbilt was a robber, but by virtue of his 
giving better terms to people who had to 
travel and had to eat bread. His induce- 
ments were such that he got the business. 
Suppose he and some others of the same 
kind of enterprise bad not come upon the 
stage, what would have been the result ? 
Evidently the old ways of business would 



have continued. We would still be going to 
Buffalo on canal boats and creeping along 
the streets of our cities in dilapidated omni- 
buses, still be doing our journeying in stage 
coaches over dusty roads and tedious hills 
at a great sacrifice of time, money, comfort 
and strength. 

The enterprise of the money makers has 
profited everybody else by exciting produc- 
tion and accumulation. The money makers 
have taken pay, not out of labor, but out of 
the increased production and savings which 
their efforts have secured. Individuals have 
sometimes suffered. The omnibuses were 
killed when the horse- car came, and A. T. 
Stewart did the business of a hundred small 
shopmen ; but the people at large saved 
time in getting where they were compelled to 
go in one case, and got what they wanted at 
less cost in the other. The street railroad 
makes ten times the money that the stage 
did, and the people save money and time. 
The people can do better by buying of Stew- 
art, and therefore they buy. They enriched 
him to the tune of thirty millions, clean cash. 
This is a great fact, but it does not show 
great robbery. It may show the very op- 
posite. 

Stewart was in business for about forty 
years, and for many years sold twenty mil- 
lions of goods per year. Had he sold but 
fifteen millions per year at a profit of five per 
cent., and invested the profit with his usual 
sagacity, he would have been worth more 
than thirty millions at the end of his forty 
years. That he left but thirty millions proves 
that his profit was not over five per cent, on 
the average. The margin for labor to gain 
from is, therefore, in the neighborhood of 
five per cent., because Stewart has proved 
that the ordinary man can not part with more 
than that and continue business. In other 
words, business stops when the margin goes 
down much below that rate. 

There are some lines of business in which 
the profit is at times more than five per cent, 
but, in the long run, the average can not 
amount to more than that. Competition in- 
creases from year to year, and profits tend 
downward all the time ; consequently, it 
takes more talent and energy to make for- 
tunes now than it did a few years ago. It is 
not so easy for a laborer to become a boss 
as it formerly was ; and as the chances for 
rising to bosshood grow less, the hatred of 
bosses increase. This is a symptom of 
discontent, and an evidence of the unreason- 
ableness of the philosophy which is at the 
bottom of the schemes for relief. Capital 
must be paid, skill must be paid, and, if they 
are each paid but two per cent, of the accru- 
ing profits, one per cent, only remains for 
labor to get as its share; and this to the 
laborer whose wages are one dollar a day 
would amount to but three dollars per year. 
This is something, to be sure, but as a 
means of elevating the laboring classes is of 
no account.— Popular Science Monthly. 



COMPETITION AMONG RETAIL 
GROCERS. 

A story is told of a Minneapolis dealer 
who hired only good-looking clerks with 
slight mustaches and lovable eyes. One of 
the recommendations of a clerk must be that 
he is an accomplished " masher." A clerk 
that cannot mash, flirt and reach down in 
his boots with his lung and hoist up a love- 
sick sigh, stands no chance for a job. Well, 
why are all these accomplishments necessa- 
ry ? I will tell you : the clerks are compell- 
ed to flirt and fall desperately in love with 
the cooks of the various houses where they 
go for orders. The more mashes they make 
the more promises of marriage they can 
show, the greater the salary such a clerk can 
demand. It is a well known fact that a cook 
can find fault with the groceries and make 
it appear that they are of the poorest quality; 
she can make it appear so that her employ- 
ers believe that they are being cheated, and 
induce them to trade elsewhere. Under the 
" masher system " intioduced here all this is 
obviated, and the cock becomes a stand-by. 
Unless she learns that her grocery boy is a 
gay deceiver her trade can be held for a long 
time. The clerks have become so crammed 
full of experience that this seldom occurs 
now. I heard of one clerk who had six 
Swedes, four Irish, eight French, three Ger- 
man, and one coloured girl on the string. He 
has promised to marry nearly all of them, 
except the negress, and he is seriously con- 
templating a proposal to her, as recently she 
has turned cold and distant toward him. 
He said that his greatest contest was with 
a red-haired, freckle face, cross-eyed beauty 
of thirty-two. He had to sigh himself down 
nearly forty younds, and ogle his eyes almost 
like the cook's before he succeeded in mak- 
ing her solid. It's a great scheme, and sur- 
passes the selling of 1 6 pounds of sugar for 
a dollar. — Ex. 



THE CUTTER.! 

The Grocers' Criterion says : Many smart 
storekeepers think it is an enterprising 
piece of business to undersell their competi- 
tors, but we have an idea that more harm is 
done to the business of a town by this system 
of trading than profit is made out of it. The 
minute a merchant begins to cut prices it 
demoralizes the entire business of a town, 
for it compels the other merchants to fall in 
line and to also sell their goods at a reduc- 
tion in order to hold the trade of their cus- 
tomers. In the aggregate they do not sell 
many more goods than they would otherwise 
have disposed of if price cutting had not 
prevailed, for as a rule customers do not 
buy more goods than they require for theT 
wants and necessities. Price-cutting pro- 
duces ill-feeling and leads to reckless rivalry 
and results in disaster. 

Our advice to our readers is not to cut 
prices when it can possibly be avoided. If 
a rival in town inaugurates the system go 
and have a friendly talk with him and show 
him the folly of the course he is pursuing. 
There is neither sense nor reason in doing 
business without a profit, and the selling of 
goods below cost is frequently an act of 
downright dishonesty, for it not infrequently 
results in the defrauding of cred.tors and 
the closing out of an establishment at 10 and 
20 cents on the dollar. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 11 

AT OLD PRICES for Teas we are receiving some orders, but can 
attend to many more. Our Travellers have " special prices " for 
this month. How is your stock ? Look it over and give us a sort- 
ing up order. 

LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, wholesale grocers, 

Telephone 447. 73 McNab St. North, Hamilton, Ont. 

TRY A SAMPLE HALF CHEST OF HILLWATTEE. 

95 CENTS PER DOZEN IS THE PRICE. 

OLD MILL BRAND TOMATOES 

The only hand packed goods in the market. For appearance, quality and flavor, the finest packed. 

W. H. Gillard & Co., Hamilton. 

AGENTS FOR CANADA. 





ALEXANDER TURNER. LLOYD T. MEWBURN. 



JAMES TURNER & GO., HAMILTON, 

Wholesale Agents, Hamilton, for 

BUTTY'S PICKLES AND 

A trial order will satisfy the buyer Batty's are the best. 



mo/nsooist 



44 /LA f\ W C" /^V/^VIV I 9 9 PURE INDIAN TEA. Always relia 

ble, never changes. In cases of 60 
1 -lb. caddies, or 120 halves. 



WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED NUMEROUS LINES OF INDIAN AND CEYLON TEAS, 

IN CHESTS AND HALF CHESTS. 

ST^ISTZD^ZRID BILIEIISnDIEID TIE^S. 

OUR BLENDING DEPARTMENT IS NOW OPEN, UNIFORMITY CAN BE RELIED ON. WE HAVE THE 
FIRST CHOICE OF THE MARKET AND THE BEST ESTATES AT OUR DISPOSAL, AND GUARANTEE EXCEL- 
LENT VALUE. WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 

STEEL, HAYTER&CO. 

11 AND 13 FRONT ST. EAST Growers' and Importers, Toronto, 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



YOUR COFFEE TRADE. 

This is the opportune time to stimulate 
the demand for fine coffee. There is scarcely 
a gathering of any moment where affee is 
not served. Where guests are entertained, 
if at no other time, people are particular to 
have fine coffee. Opinions may vary as to 
which is the most enj >yable fl .vor, that of a 
strong or a mild coffre, but theie is no differ- 
ence of opinion about coffee having good 
bodv and fl ivor being preferable to one of 
thin or wnody fl ivor and light body. 

It is d ffkult to get high ^rade goods with- 
out paying a good price ; hence the dealers 
who are bound to hive a first-class coffee 
trade give attention to quality »ather than 
price. Their standard of grade is high and 
that must be maintained regardless of cost. 
Such dealers insist on having fresh roasted 
coffee and urge customers to have it ground 
fresh and made fresh. They furnish their 
trade with recipes for making a perfect cup 
of coffee, including cafe noir, black coffee, 
Creole coffee, the Turkish method, the Vienna 
style, and how to utilize coffee in other ways. 

They see to it that customers are supplied 
with coffee of uniform grade, and therefore 
insist that clerks shall keep in mind the sort 
each customer uses. This is not an easy 
matter, but it can be done by giving it 
thought and attention, even if it involves 
keeping a record. It is surprising in our 
large city stores, to note how familiar the 
floor walkers and heads of departments and 
the clerks are with the names and habits of 
customers, and how well they remember the 
character of goods purchased. If this is done 
in mammoth concerns it can be done in the 
little stores. 

It is one of the secrets of building up a lu- 
crative business and one which is all-impor- 
tant in establishing a reputation for keeping 
fine coffee. One who keeps fine tea, fine 
coffee, good flour, and the best butter, can 
command patronage against all competitors. 




TO YOU it is 

PROFITABLE and a 

QUICK SELLER. 

Thousands testily to its PURITY and 

Wonderful washing qualities in 

HARD or SOFT WATER. 



A customer suited with those articles is sure 
to commend and advertise his source of sup- 
ply. 

One of the city retailers issues the follow- 
ing points : 

SERVING. 

In serving, have the cups and cream warm 
and pour the cream in the cup before pouring 
in the coffee. 

PROPORTION. 

One tablesooonful of coffee to each cup is 
the popular allowance. The tablespoonful 
may be scant, even, or heaped, according to 
the strength desired. 

HOW COFFEE SHOULD BE GROUND. 

For making coffee by the French or per- 
colating method, the coffee should always 
be ground very fine or pulverized ; otherwise 
the full strength will not be secured. 

For making coffee by boiling, the coffee 
should always be ground coarse or granu- 
lated ; otherwise the coffee will be muddy. 

We have special mills for pulverizing and 
granulating, and grind the coffees fresh for 
each order. 

The finest coffees cannot be sold at retail 
and return the seller a just margian below 
30 to 40 cents per pound, as to kind. We 
find prices ranging from 25 to 40 cents. Some 
prominent retailers sell Padang Java, of fine 
grade, at yj to 38 cents, others get 40 cents; 
for Maracaibo, 30 to 35 cents. The seller of 
fine coffee should have a good margin, for 
those who demand the best, as a rule, are 
willing to pay the price of the finest. — 
American Grocer. 



TRY IT. 



ROYAL SOAP CO.. 

Winnipeg, Man. 



INTELLIGIBLE PRICE MARKS. 

Very few stores now adhere to the old 
plan of cipher marking. Experience has 
proved that a majority of customers pre- 
fer goods to be marked in plain fig- 
ures, no one liking the idea of two sets 
of figures unless he is sure he is among 
the favored ones who get the benefit of 
the lower scale. It is said to be the prac- 
tice with the medical fraternity of some 
towns to grade their charges to patients 
according to the style of house in which 
they live, and the same idea prevails so 
much as to retail stores that ladies have 
been "known to send servants down to 
stores because they could get a larger 
discount. Other ladies are careful never 
to dress very well when shopping) and 
this shows how firmly the impression pre- 
vails that a genuine one-price store is a 
novelty. The easiest way to get over 
this impression is to have every article 
marked 'in plain figures, eo that the 
customer may see that one price prevails 
for all. This is easier than arguing that 
the abuses feared are reminiscences of the 
old days when the evils of caste were 
much more rampant than now, for experi- 
ence proves that the fear certainly ex- 
ists, no matter how absolutely it may 
be without foundation. Ten years ago 
part of the education of a store clerk 
used to be the mastering of the cipher 
plan adopted in marking, but this is now 
quite a small matter. As already stated, 
most stores mark their goods in plain 
figures, and the few that do not adopt 
a very simple plan for denoting the 
price.— St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 



THE HUSTLER. 

The hustler, being unbeloved 

By every Grace and Muse, 
He eats at night in Boston and 

Next morn in Syracuse. 
From the Adirondack Mountains 

To the fair Pacific slopes 
He plays with lines of latitude 

Like little skipping ropes. 

His home is in the sleeping car — 

No vine or fig tree's shade — 
His music is its clanking wheels, 

His poetry is trade. 
This missionary of the mart 

He spreads the true faith's germ's — 
The endless merits of his house 

Above all other firms. 

He button-holes the kings of trade, 

His sample case unrolls 
And talks until the love of life 

Grows feeble in their souls. 
The bolted door swings wide for him, 

He needs no bolts or bars, 
And fears not any face of man 

Beneath the sun or stars. 

The heroes of baronial times 

Were armed from hair to heel, 
With iron pots upon their heads 

And pantaloons of steel. 
The hustler hero of to-day 

Is armorless and weak, 
But for the vigor of his tongue 

And blushless breadth of cheek. 

He meets all men with fearless mein, 

Nor knows to pause or swerve, 
With Lilliputian bashfulness 

And Broddignagian nerve. 
No dim abstractions vex his soul, 

His creed and happiness 
Is just to make a sale and catch 

The two o'clock express. 
— Sam Walker Foss in the Yankee Blade. 



CULTIVATE A MEMORY FOR NAMES 

"As good a piece of advice as I could give 
a young man starting business," said an old 
and successful merchant, "would be to get 
his customers' names right. Of course, every- 
body means to do this, but I don't think 
everybody attaches to it its full importance. 
The fact is that almost every man is proud 
of his name, whatever it may be, and he dis- 
likes to see it misspelled or incorrectly writ- 
ten. There are plenty of names which sound 
alike, bui which vary in the spelling, perhaps 
by only a single letter ; and, too, in taking a 
man's name it is not so difficult as one might 
imagine to make a mistake in the initials, for 
there are letters which sound very much 
alike. When you get a new customer get 
his name right to start with. No man likes 
to receive a package or a bill or a commu- 
nication of anvsort with his'name misspelled 
however modest and good natured he may 
be, he is pretty sure to be annoyed by it."— 
Sun. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



Fruits of the Season. 



:etow iist stoee. 



Grenoble, Marbot and French Walnuts, 

Sicily Filberts, 

Tarragona Almonds, 

Cases Vostizza Currants, 

Half Cases Vostizza Currants, 

Cases Patras Currants, 

Hallewee Dates, 

Eleme and Natural Figs, 

Fancy Seven Crown Figs, 

Arguimbans Off-Stalk and 
quality 



California Evaporated Apricots, 
Good Average Sultanas, 
Choice Sultanas, 
Loose Muscatels, 
Imperial Cabinets, 
Connoisseur Clusters, 
Ex. Dessert Clusters, 
Royal Buckingham Clusters, 
Four Crown Layer Valencias, 
very fine. 



P.Eckardt&Co. 

Wholesale Grocers, 

TORONTO. 



FOR 
COOKING 

PURPOSES. 



£t.CHAR 4e 



Iflf 

EVAPORATED CREAM 



It makes the most delicious. 

Puddings, 
Custards, 
Ice Cream. 

DELAFIELD, MCCOVERN & CO., 

91 Hudson St., Sole Agents. 

NEW YORK. 

33 River Street, 

CHICAGO. 

215 California St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

For sale in Canada by 

AMES TURNER & CO 

Hamilton, Ont. 



HUDON. HEBERT <£ C1E.. 



Wholesale Grocers 

AND 

Wine Importers, 



304, 306 St. Paul St., 

143, 145 Commissioners St. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 



Now in stock and ready to quote : 

2000 boxes Sultana Raisins. 

200 barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

200 half barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

New Nuts of all kinds 

Fine Off Stalk Valencia Raisins, different brands. 

A few boxes NEW MALAGA Fruit left. 



L. CHAPUT, FILS & CIE. 



Wholesale Grocers, Montreal, 



Bensdorp's Cocoa 

1-4, 1-2 and 1 lb. 

No first-class Grocer can afford to be without it 
Send for quotations. 

Caverhill, Rose, Hughes & Co., 

"Wholesale G-roeers, MONTREAL. P. Q. 

Todhunter, Mitchell & Co., 

DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 

HIGH GRADE COFFEES, 

Old Government Java, Arabian Mocha, Plantation Ceylon, Maracaibo 

and Santos. 

Grocers draw trade by selling their FAVORITE EXCELSIOR BLEND. 
RELIABLE ROASTING BY PATENTED PROCESS. TORONTO. 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




(This department is made up largely of items 
from travellers and retailers throughout the 
Dominion. It contains much interesting informa- 
tion regarding the movements of those in the 
trade. The editor will thank contributors to 
mail copy to reach the head office Tuesday. J 

H. Corrin, fish and fruit dealer, has re- 
turned to Spadina Avenue. 

Turner & Co., wholesale grocers, Hamil- 
ton, sent a box of tobacco to the local fire- 
men. 

H. Travers, fruit dealer, has moved from 
Queen St. west in this city to Spadina 
Avenue. 

Arthur P. Tippet, of A. P. Tippet & Co., 
St. Johns, N. B., and Toronto, Ont., left for 
England on the 28th. 

Among the recent arrivals is noted Mr. 
J. B. McLean, cf the Canadian Grocer. — 
N. Y. Commercial Bulletin. 

The commercial travellers of the North- 
West gave a most successful ball in the Man- 
itoba hotel Winnipeg, on the 29th ult. 

Simon Leiser has purchased the general 
store at the Union mines B. C, from the 
Messrs. Dunsmuir and will conduct it in 
future. 

The little son of Frank Williams (of D. 
Williams & Son, Colborne St., Toronto), 
died last week from the effects of the kick of 
a horse. 

The Executive committee of Toronto Re- 
tail Grocers' Association has changed the 
date of the association's annual \t home, 
which will be held on January 18. 

The Public School Board of Toronto has 
accepted the offer of A. P. Tippet & Co., to 
supply to the schools cases of specimens and 
charts illustrating the growth and manufac- 
ture of cocoa. 

The telephone and trolley wires came into 
contact at Yonge and Gerrard streets, To 
ronto. As a result an instrument at James 
Langskill's, grocer, 60 Gerrard street east 
was burned out. 

Geo. C. Loyd, who for several years has 
represented the firm of S. S. Young & 
Co., wholesale grocers, Trenton, Ont., 
was married last week to Miss Jennie 
Gibson, a popular young lady of Belleville. 

The general store stock in the estate of 
James Malcolm, Whitevale, Ont., amounting 
to $2,082 32 was sold on the 29th ult., by 
Suckling & Co. of this city at 71c. in the dol- 
lar to Thomas Beare, general merchant, 
Whitevale. 

R. M. Corrie, secretary of the Retail 
Grocers' Association of this city, manages to 
snatch a moment now and then from his 



manifold business cares for the cultivation 
of the Muse. Contributions of his appear 
from time to time in various papers, the last 
one being in the Royal Templar. 

There were 2,900,000,000 cigarettes of do- 
mestic make consumed in the U. S. dur- 
ing the year ending June 30. About 98 per 
cent, were of the brands controlled by the 
American Tobacco Company. 

On Saturday evening of last week the fac- 
tory and bonded warehouse of J. C. Harris, 
cigar manufacturer, St. Catharines, was brok- 
en into and about 800 cigars stolen from the 
warehouse. The entrance was effected 
through the front door, a window in it being 
smashed first. 

A syndicate has been formed by the mer- 
chants in the vicinity of the St. Lawrence 
market, Toronto, with the object of purchas- 
ing the existing rights of the present lessee 
of the market. If there are no legai difficul- 
ties, it is proposed after the purchase to 
charge no market fees. 

James Fernie, of Liverpool, England, had 
an interview with Mr. Johnson, Dominion 
statistician, last week. Mr. Fernie is en- 
gaged in the dead meat business and is anx- 
ious to open up an agency in Liverpool for 
the sale of Canadian beef to be carried over 
in refrigerator chambers on the ocean steam- 
ers. 

The Christmas number of the Canadian 
Grocer is one of the most handsome holi- 
day numbers that has come to our desk this 
season. A handsome cover, colored inks 
and beautiful engravings are combined with 
such a lot of interesting reading matter that 
it must find a welcome everywnere. — Penn- 
sylvania Grocer. 

The people of the Maritime provinces will 
save one million during the past year owing 
to the exceptional cheapness of flour and 
oatmeal, as compared with a year ago. Flour 
is now forty cents a barrel cheaper there than 
it has been at any time within the past forty 
years, and a dollar cheaper than in 1891 

W. H. Seyler, of Eby, Blain & Co., well 
known to our readers by his bright contribu- 
tions to The Grocer, has been laid up 
since Christmas with quinsy. He was at his 
post as usual on Tuesday, but he soon found 
that his return to duty was premature, and 
had to go home again. We hope he will 
soon be as well as ever. 

D. Ritchie, who was for some time a resi- 
dent of Brantford, having the position of 
book-keeper at the starch works, in which 
concern he had an interest, died in Scotland 
recently. Deceased visited there in the hope 
that the trip would benefit his health, but the 
seeds of consumption had fastened on him, 
and he passed away as stated. 

The steamer Coquitlam recently discharg- 
ed a quantity of northern salmon at Tacoma. 
It is to be frozen by the Crescent Creamery 
Company and shipped to St. Petersburg. It 
will go east over the Northern Pacific Rail- 



way, and at Philadelphia will make as direct 
connection as possible for the Baltic. This 
is probably the first shipment of the kind ever 
made, and the success or failure of it will be 
awaited with interest. 

The last of this season's British Columbia 
salmon fleet has now been despatched, be- 
ing rather later than last season. It is ex- 
pected that the first vessel will arrive at 
just about when the old stocks have all been 
disposed of, and thus there will be a good de- 
mand for the new salmon. Latest reports 
from England state that the market there is 
strong and the outlook for next season is 
favorable. 

The employes in George E Tuckett & 
Sons' tobacco factory, Hamilton, received 
the Christmas boxes on Friday which it is 
the custom of their employers annually to 
distribute. Each piece hand received a tur- 
key, the time hands were given an extra 
week's wages, and the stemmers were each 
presented with 50 cents. The presents were 
distributed by George T. Tuckett amid loud 
cheering, and the company separated loud 
in praise of the generosity and thoughtful- 
nessofthe firm. 

Mr. Leslie McMann, one of Thorold's po- 
pular grocers, has purchased the Munro 
store on Front street, and will shortly remove 
his large stock of groceries, crockery, etc., 
as well as his pork-packing department, to 
the same. Mr. McMann's host of friends in 
that town hope he will be as successful in his 
new store as in the old one,where a few years 
ago he started in a small way, but by honest 
and fair dealing, coupled with integrity, push 
and energy, he has built up a most extensive 
grocery business in Thorold. 

Shippers of hay to England from Kingston, 
Ont., have at last heard of the result of the 
venture. The accounts of the sales do not 
show satisfactory returns for the shippers, 
but they look well for the commission mer- 
chants. Mr. Mooers, grain forwarder, said 
that England would never be a suitable 
market for Canadian products. It was too 
far away, and business men were too wily 
All they cared for was the making of their 
commission of five per cent. Since Mr. 



Bottles ! Bottles I 

Ale, Wine, and Spirit 
Bottles. 

FOR SALE BY 

BLAIKLOCK BROS., 

17 Common St., 
Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 



J. F. EBY. 




'- ' -*P" **ff|W^4-* VsS. 







HUGH BLAIN. 



Put up in ^i lb. and i lb. packages, and 5 lb. Tins. 

Eby, Blain & Co., 

Wholesale Grocers, TORONTO, ONT. 



Mooets has been in business he has formed 
the opinion that Canada and the United 
States are the proper markets for American 
products. — Kingston Whig. 

On Thursday, Orillia, was damaged by a 
disastrous fire. Several Quebec business 
men were heavy losers in a fire which visited 
their city the same day. 

An electric wire crossed a telephone wire 
on Gerrard street in this city on Thursday, 
and the result is a ruined telephone in a 
neighboring store. 

W. M. Milligan's store, 99 Queen street 
west, Toronto, was entered the other morn- 
ing and the cash register broken into. As 
there was no money in the drawer the thief 
had his trouble for nothing. 

The Rathbun Co., of Deseronto, and the 
McMullen Bros., of Picton, formerly owners 
of the Central Ontario railroad, are mooting 
a scheme to connect Picton and Deseronto 
by rail. The Bay of Quinte will be bridged 
at St. John's Island. 

David Blackley, Hamilton, is organizing a 
company to manufacture a barrel-making 
machine, invented by W. T. Vale, a Toronto 
man. Staves are fed into the machine, and 
it shapes them into barrels in as workman- 
like a style as could be done by an expert 
cooper, except that the ends and hoops are 
left to be put on by hand. The capacity of 
the machine is one barrel a minute. The in- 



vention has been patented in 1 1 countries, 
and a factory for the manufacture of the 
machines has been started in Newark, N. J. 

A very pleasant affair took place on Thurs- 
day evening of last week at W. B. Maclean's 
residence, 198 Jarvis street, when the em- 
ployees of Sloan & Crowther presented him 
with a beautiful onyx clock as a slight token 
of the high esteem m which he is held by 
them. W. B. Smith filled the chair very ably, 
and the presentation was made by Alex. Hill. 
Speeches, songs and recitations, banjo and 
harmonica selections were indulged in by the 
boys, after which a sumptuous repast was 
provided by the host. Mr. Maclean is about 
to assume the secretaryship of the Conger 
Lumber Co. 

The British Columbia Gazette contains 
notice of the incorporation of three new can- 
ning companies. The first, the Pacific Coast 
Packing Co., of New Westminister, has a 
capital of $15,000, in shares of $150, and is 
represented by Ceorge I Wilson, George 
Casady and N. H. Bain, the first trustees. 
The Federation Brand Salmon Canning Co., 
Walter Morris, S. M. Okell and A. J. Mc- 
Lellan, of Victoria, formed with a capital of 
$50,000 in 1,000 shares, to take over the 
business of "McLennan's Cannery" on the 
Naas, and deal in fish prepared for market 
in every known way, the head office being in 
Victoiia. The Steveston Canning Co. — M. 
Costello, R. A. McMorran and Edward Hunt 



trustees — place their capital at $50,000 in 
$50 shares, and propose to can and deal in 
salmon and to manufacture fish oils and fish 
manures. 

The Ontario government has appointed a 
preliminary commission to collect for the 
consideration of his honor in council and 
otherwise all such facts obtainable without 
an oral examination of witnesses, as bear on 
the several questions which have arisen with 
respect to direct taxation for municipal and 
other purposes, and its incidence, and all 
present and proposed exemptions from taxa- 
tion, including in regard to all such particu- 
lars a comparison ot the laws and practice of 
this province with the laws and practice of 
Great Britian, the other provinces of the em- 
pire, the United States and elsewhere. The 
commissioners are John R. Cartwright, 
chairman, Hon. T. W. Anglin and E. Saun- 
ders, secretary. 

Mr. P. W. King, manager ot the Oriental 
Traders' Co., limited, has returned from a 
six weeks' business trip, during which he visi- 
ted Montreal, Toronto, London, Hamilton, 
Winnipeg, and other leading cities. Mr. 
King reports business as good in the East, 
and he succeeded in taking several orders 
for teas, silks and other Oriental merchan- 
dise. Everywhere Mr. King was asked nu- 
merous questions about Vancouver, and 1 
great deal of interest is taken in the East in 
the progress of the Terminal City. As 
is well known here Mr. King is an ardent 
Imperial Federationist, and conversed on 
this subject with several leading business 
men in the East, and found that Imperial 
Federation is gaining ground there. — Van- 
couver News-Advertiser. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




Star, 

Sterling, 

Judge, 

St. Lawrence, 

"Something 
Good," 



Are brands that are 
hard to beat. 

Do you sell them ? 



Empire Tobacco Co., 
MONTREAL. 



DRY GOODS. 

During the past twu weeks trade has been 
slow with the wholesale houses in general. 
But in spite of this the movement in repeats 
for woollens and other heavy winter goods 
has been sufficient to lighten stocks very 
materially. Heavy mits and gloves, heavy 
underwear, hosiery, overcoatings of all kinds 
and heavy suitings and dress goods have 
all moved out well. The fur dealers during 
the week ending December 24th did a huge 
trade, and were lifted out of the slough of 
despond into whirh they had gone a short 
distance. Travellers are again on the road 
with full lines of spring samples, and soon 
shipments of these will commence. 

Brook's spools have drrpped from $3.20 
to $3.00. This makes this the lowest priced 
200 yards, 6 cord spool in the market. This 
is due to the arrangement in the Central 
Agency which has been described often in 
these columns. 

Belding, Paul & Co. and The Corticelli 
Silk Co., have come to an agreement re- 
garding the prices of sewing silk and twists. 
We understand that there are no material 
changes in prices, but the old trade dis- 
count has been done away with. This 
change will do away with the old under 
bidding by means of discounts and make 
only one price whether goods are bought 
from the wholesalers or the manufacturers. 
Belding, Paul & Co. have issued a circular 
which reads as follows : Owing to the large 
advance in raw silk, we have reduced dis- 
counts to the trade. In consequence of this, 
we beg to notify you that from this date, 
you are requested to sell our silk threads, 
art silks, etc., at list prices, less 5 per cent, 
cash only. Any house not adhering to this 
contract will forfeit trade discount. 

NOTES. 

Gordon, Mackay & Co. are receiving their 
spring goods. In the staple department 
they are showing new lines in prints, teazle 
cloths, flannelettes, shaker flannels, Ameri- 
can indigo prints, sateens and plushes. 
These lines include all the latest varieties 
and the best qualities from theleading manu- 
facturers domestic and foreign. In the fur- 
nishing department they are carrying a long 
range of men's braces in domestic, American 
and English manufacture. They claim that 
they are selling these at prices which enable 
them to compete successfully with the so- 
called manufacturers who are drumming up 
the retail trade. In their dress goods de- 
partment they are showing a new thing in 
skirtings. This is a marine shot effect which 
is of heavy quality and comes in 38-inch 
widths. It will be very popular on account 
of the neat effect it makes whenever lifted 
slightly or moved quickly, and also on ac- 
count of the rich appearance secured for a 
very moderate price. 

Wyld, Grasett & Darling have had a 
strong run on their men's winter gloves. 



Their experience has been that buyers wait 
until the last minute to purchase these goods, 
and the consequence was that some were too 
late to secure some of their leading lines, as 
the big demand depleted the stock of the 
best lines during the latter half of December. 
Their trade in neckwear during the past 
three weeks has been of enormous volume, 
and surpasses anything in the history of the 
house. The stock is still well-assorted, and 
more shipments are expected next week. 

Jno. Macdonald & Co. have just passed 
into stock two hundred and fifty bales of car- 
pets, comprising new patterns in tapestries, 
Brussels and Wiltons. These are extremely 
nice goods, and considerable care and tact 
has been exercised to secure goods suitable 
for the various requirements of the trade. 
They have also passed into stock three hun- 
dred pieces of domestic wool carpets. The 
patterns are new and designs much superior 
to the domestic make of former seasons. 
This shipment comprises a strong selection 
from all the leading manufacturers, and is 
sufficiently well assorted to give any dealer 
a sufficient choice. They have also passed 
into stock a big range of domestic oilcloths, 
both floor and table, including the newest 
designs in each. 

W. R. Brock & Co.'s warehouse was closed 
up on Tuesday on account of the funeral of 
the wife of one of their travellers. Her death 
cast a gloom over the holiday spirit of all the 
employees of the house, as they felt deeply 
for their fellow employee in his sad bereave- 
ment. 

John Macdonald & Co. have laid in a 
large stock of buttons, consisting of pear- 
lettas in all sizes and shapes, fancy metals, 
combinations of metal and ivonnes, silk cov- 
ered buttons, jets, gilts, silvers, and other 
leading novelties. Their staple lines of 
pearls are also in complete shape at present. 
They expect a strong demand for buttons 
this spring. They will be much used for 
trimmings. Buckles will also be in good de- 
mand, and they are prepared for this with a 
long range of oxidized gilts, silvers and 
pearls in new shapes and at moderate prices. 
The Empire dresses will be ornamented 
with these buckles. They have a line of 
black corsets which are in good demand 
just now. It is called the B. B. 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

It contains neither Ammonia, Alum, or 
any other injurious ingredients. 

It is the lightest and fluffiest of all pow- 
ders. 

^PRICE'S 

flaking 



^Powder 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



John Jamieson & Co's 
LOCHFYNE 

HERRINGS 

56-60 E. Howard Street, GLASGOW. 
Agent, W. S. KENNEDY, 
463 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 

DRESSED 
POULTRY 

We are now booking orders for shipment 
on or about December the fourth next, to 
points in British Columbia, delivery in time 
for Xmas trade. Poultry will be thoroughly 
frozen and packed in either close or open 
cases, weighing two hundred pounds each. 
We offer special prices on large lots. 

PARSONS PRODUCE CO,, 



WINNIPEG, 



MANITOBA. 



W. F. BUCHANAN, 

BROKER. COMMISSION MERCHANT 

AND 

GENERAL PURCHASING AGENT, 

REPRESENTING: 

ARMOUR & Co., Chicago, 111. 

THE ARMOUR PACKING CO., Kansas City, Mo. 

THE B. C. SUGAR REFINING CO., Ltd., Van- 
couver, B. C. 

BUCHANAN & CO., Saltcoats, N. W. T. 

HIRAM WALKER & SONS, Ltd., Walkerville, 
Ont. 

JOHN DEWAR & SONS, Tullymet Distillery, 
Perth, N. B. 

PERINET ET FILS, Reims. 

"Warehouses on C. P. R. Track. 

Excise, Customs and Free, 

and Low Rates Storage. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

3St OTIOE. 

1 he British Columbia Fruit Canning and 
Coffee Co'i, Lt'd. 

VANCOUVER. B.C. 

Having largely increased their capacity. We ad- 
vise all dealers to see their price list before plac- 
ing their ordeis for Jams, Jellies, Canned Fruits, 
and Canned Vegetables. 

Besides their regular brands of Ground Coffee, 
now so favorably known, they quote : 
Blend No. 1 at 35c, either ground or whole roasted 
" 2 at 33c., " " 

3 at 30c, " " " 

Their Flavoring Extracts are of the choicest 
quality. 

REINHARDT & CO., 

SALVADOR LAGER 

IS THE VERY BEST. 

TOEOlsTTO. 



LAURENCE GIBB 

Provision Merchant, 

83 COLBORNE STREET, - TORONTO 

All kinds of Hog Products handled. Also Butter 
Cheese, Poultry, Tallow, Etc. 

PATENT EGG CARRIERS SUPPLIED. 
Good Prices paid for Good Dairy Butter. 

Meglaughlin, Marshall & Co., 

Wholesale Provision Merchants, 
3 and 4 Corn Exchange, 

A1 f Manchester, 

Also at ' 

Liverpool and Glasgow, E, H Q" I 3 PI U 

Are prepared to receive Consignments of Eggs, 
Bacon, Hams, etc. Having been established more 
than 40 years, they are in connection with all the 
best buyers in the North of England. 

W. GIBBINS <So CO., 

Gommission and 

iWanufacturers' Agent, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



We are open for Consignments of Dried 
and Evaporated Apples, Beans, Peas, &c, 
or will take orders for packers and others. 

JAS. DICKSON & CO., 

26 WEST MARKET STREET, 
Provision and Commission Merchant?. 

Eggs, Butter, Hams, Lard, Bacon, Cheese, Dried 
Apples, Finnan Haddies, Dried Cod Fish, bought 
or sold on commission. Agents for all lines of 
Canned Corned Beef. Egg Carriers supplied. 

J. F. YOUNG & CO., Commission Mer- 
chants, will give reliable prices in this space 
in The Grocer as they now do in the 
Daily Globe on Wednesday, and in the 
Toronto World on Tuesdays, Thursdays, 
and Saturdays. 

Consignments of produce solicited, which 
will be handled to best advantage and 
prompt returns made. 

J. F. YOUNG Sc CO., 

PRODUCE COMMISSIONS, 

74 Front St. E., Toronto. 

PARK, BLACKWELL & CO, 

(Limited.) 
— SUCCESSORS TO - 

TORONTO. 

Full lines ot Superior Cured Hams, Break- 
fast Bacon, New Special Rolls, 
Beef Hams, Long Clear Bacon, 
Butter, Cheese, Lard, Eggs, 
Etc. 
Write for Price List. 



ZrPTJTT 

TEXAS BALSAM 

msr stock:. 

The Great Healer for all kinds of wounds on 
Horses and Cattle. $3.00 worth only costs you 
$1.80. Express prepaid. Cash with order. 
C. F. SEGSWORTH, 
6 Wellington St. East, 
Sample 26c. postpaid. Toronto. 

S. K. MOYER, 

Commission Merchant 

And dealer in foreign and 

domestic fruits, fish, 

poultry, etc. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Oysters, Oyster Carriers, 
Smoked, Salt and Fresh 
Fish. Consignments and 
Orders solicited. 

76 Colborne St., 

Toronto, Ont. 

George McWilliam. Frank Everist. 

MGWILUAM & EVERIST 

Fruit and Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 

TORONTO, ONT. 




FIGS, DATES, NUTS, 

ALMERIA GRAPES, Etc, 

Florida Oranges are now arriving in car lots, 
stock fine, also Messina Lemons. Will fill 
all orders at lowest possible price. 



J. Cleghorn & Son 



94 Yonge St., TORONTO. 



Fancy Florida Oranges- 

Car arriving weekly. 

Car Messina Lemons — 

Just arrived. 



We are handling best brands Bulk and Canned 
Oysters, Haddies— Portland and St. Johns, 
Fancy Bloaters and all kinds Fresh Fish, New 
Golden Dates, Figs, Nuts, etc. 



WILLIAM RYAN, 

PORK PACKER 

Toronto, Ont. 

HAMS, MESS PORK, 

BREAKFAST BACON, SHORT GUT, 
ROLLS, LARD. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



McLAREN'S 



Is Honest Goods and just 

the Thing on Which to 

make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, ana as prices are modified by both 
quantity and quality, the quotations given below 
and in our Prices Current necessarily take a wide 
range.] 



TORONTO MARKETS. 

Toronto, Jan. 5, 1893. 

GROCERIES. 

Trade still moves at a snail's pace. The 
revival of demand is not looked for until the 
middle of the month. The only event of any 
importance to be noticed is an advance in 
the price of sugar, the refineries having 
moved up their quotations l /%c. the whole- 
salers had to follow. The results of stock- 
taking are still a matter of speculation, the 
inventories being yet in process. There is 
no unusual expectation from the returns from 
stock and books, but the feeling appears to 
be general that 1892 will show a better net 
result than 1891 did, though the close work 
on sugar made ar. unnecessary discount that 
will bring the net figures closer to those of 
the former bad year than there was any 
need for. The winter's business yet to be 
done holds out no prospect that it will be 
above the usual common place movement 
until preparations begin to be made on 
spring account. The weather will of course 
be a factor on one side or other to modify 
the conditions of trade. 

COFFEE. 

The play of the market outside does not 
change the position of affairs materially, any 
easier feeling being but transient and al- 
ways followed by firmness. The stocks on 
spot in this market are light, and are low in 
the finer grades. The trade at the moment 
does not, however, call for large supplies, 
and wholesale buyers are availing them- 
selves of the slack spell to gain time in the 
placing of their orders foi further supplies. 
The prices remains from 20c, upwards for 
Rios. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

Trade in dried fruits, as in all other things 
is suspended for the time being. No holder 
of stock feels any misgiving as to prices, the 
belief being general that when the dull 
period is over the supply will be easily ab- 
sorbed at current prices. The position of 
the New York market bears out this view. 
There Valencia raisins continue to be good 
property and are firmly held at unchanged 
prices. Here they remain on a basis of ^ l / 2 c. 
but, as before, there is off-stalk fruit offering 
at 4^c, but it has little to recommend it to 
buyers. Layers are quoted from 7c. There 
is no change in Sultanas, which range from 
tyi to \2%c. Malaga raisins are easy at 
following prices : London layers $2.20 to 
$2.50, Blackbaskets in boxes $4, in quarter 
flats $1.30, blue baskets in boxes $4.75, con- 
noisseur clusters in boxes $4, in quarter flats 
$1.25, superior Dehesa layers in boxes $5, in 



quarter flats $1.75, Royal Buckingham $6, 
Imperial cabinets $2.20 to $2.75, finest Vega 
$7. Prunes are quiet at from 7 >£c. Currants 
show an easier tendency in New York, where 
coming receipt* are expected to further de- 
press prices. Jobbers here continue to sell 
at from 5^c. The stock of 10 lb. figs is still 
low, but prices do not go up, as buying is 
not an influence at present. Boxes of figs 
range from io>£ to i6j£c, according to size. 
Bags are 4K to 5>£c. Dates are unchanged 
at 5X to 52<c. Prime Grenobles 16 to i6j|c, 
lower grades of Grenobles 15 to 16c, Mar- 
bots \y/ 2 to 14c, Cahors 11 to I2j£c, Tar- 
ragona almonds 15 to 16c, Sicily filberts 9^ 
to lie. The prices of peels remain at 15 to 
16c. for lemon, 10 to 18c. for orange, 28 to 
30c. for citron. 

SUGAR. 

Since the writing of the paragraph on the 
price of sugar, which appears in our editor- 
ial columns, the advance therein anticipated 
has at least partially come to pass, for the 
refiners have moved up their prices y$c on 
both granulated and yellow. The whole- 
salers of course had to respond, and their 
prices are now y&c. higher than they were 
last week. The quotations now made by 
jobbersare 3^c. upwards or yellow and $%c 
on granulated. The expectation of a stiffer 
price made wholesalers anxious to do buying 
on future account in advance of the rise, but 
this business the refiners would not accept at 
current prices. As the present price is firm 
there is reason to believe that values will be 
higher still Retailers, except in a few in- 
stances have not shown themselves eager to 
forestall any further increase in the price. It 
is probable, however, that more interest will 
be shown by buyers, now that one fraction 
of the advance has been put on. 

Willert & Gray's New York Statistical says: 
The week — Raws and refined unchanged. 
Total stock in all the principal countries, at 
latest uneven dates, is 731,726 tons, against 
659,003 tons at the same dates last year. 
Havanna and Matanzas stock, none, against 
23,000 tons last year. 

Raws — The closing week of the year is 
quiet and steady. Business was fixed at the 
outports at full quotations, and Ne»v York, 
after a little hesitation, bought on the same 
basis. The purchases of beet sugars and 
Javas recently made to a large extent in Eu- 
rope, possibly 50,000 tons, show a disposition 
to take supplies from Europe earlier in 1893 
than in 1883, rather than to depend entirely 
on Cuba and other cane countries. The lat- 
est information by cable from Cuba repeats 
the estimates of 10 per cent, smaller crop 
than last year, but there is a disposition to 
wait before accepting such, in view of the fact 
that the early estimates last year were over 
100,000 tons less than the final out-turn 

Refined. — A steady hand-to-mouth trade 
marks the closing week of the year. There 
is nothing in the present outlook of the raw 
market to anticipate any immediate change 
in refined. 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

The syrup trade is of small dimensions. 
The advance in sugar has made the price 
appreciably firmer, and as the refineries are 
finding sale for all they turn out, the position 
of the market is not so much in favor of 
buyers as it was. The lowest price is 2>£c. 

Molasses is at the moment neglected by 
buyers, but movement.is expected to be com- 
paratively brisk when general trade gets 
fairly started again. Some New Orleans 
stock has been brought in recently. The 
range for N. O. molasses is 26 to 52c. West 
India molasses is quoted at 32c. up. 



TEA. 

The position of all stocks of tea confirms 
the views all along entertained that prices 
will be under the influence of the seller more 
than of the buyer when trade gets going. 
Within the next two weeks it is expected 
that a good deal of tea will be sold. Good 
low grades and mediums will then be at a 
premium, and but a limited quantity, espe- 
cially of Japans, can be forthcoming at any 
price. Congous are likewise firm and scarce 
in the saleable descriptions. In Indian and 
Ceylon teas there is no change since the ad- 
vance noted some time ago. 



MARKET NOTES. 

[Importers, wholesale merchants and manufac- 
turers should send, any items intended tor this 
department so that they may reach the head 
office not later than Wednesday morning. The 
editor will always welcome such information.] 

Sloan & Crowther have received a ship- 
ment of very choice New Orleans molasses. 

In reference to Lucas, Steele & Bristol's 
Januaryprices for teas they will gladly furnish 
samples and figures on application. 

W. T. Harris, Chatham, N. B., dealer in 
general merchandise, offers 200 cases canned 
lobsters, also dried cod of finest quality. 

The E. S. Burnham Company, New York 
city, manufacture some very fine grocers' 
specialties, the sale on which is increasing 
very rapidly in Canada. Clam Bouillon is 
one of them. 

The. O & W. Thum Co., Grand Rapids, 
Mich., are getting out a new holder for their 
Tanglefoot Sticky Fly Paper which will be 
an artistic thing in the way of engraving and 
printing, and an ornament when in use. The 
folding arrangement has been simplified and 
will be easily understood and readily set up 
by anybody. These changes will make this 
really useful article still more popular. 

Advices from Florida report that the crop 
this season will probably foot up to about 3.- 
2oo,oooboxes of oranges, over 1,200,000 boxes 
of which have already been shipped. A 
prominent New York receiver who has been 
in Florida for some time writes that Boston, 
Philadelphia and Western markets are well 
represented, but there is an absence of New 
(Continued on page 20.) 



CANNED GOODS. 

TORONTO. 

It is difficult to find anything to say about 
the canned goods trade, which retains with- 
out modification all the features that have 
distinguished it since the pack was complet- 
ed. Vegetables are still selling only in a 
hand-to-mouth way, and at 8oc. to $i, the 
finer brands being mainly in request. Fruits, 
which had a fairly good spell before the ho- 
lidays have not been selling since. Salmon 
is still dull. The position of the salmon mar- 
ket continues to be essentially strong, but 
current trade locally is dull. The jobbers 
appear to be sincere in their efforts to obtain 
better prices than they got last year, as there 
is no report of any business below $1.45. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 



HENDERSON 

& LIDDELL, 

3 Eastcheap, London, Eng. 

DEALERS IN 

Sugar, Dried and Green Fruit, 
Rice and Canned Goods 

Are prepared to enter into correspondence 
regarding purchase or consignments ol all 
Canned Goods, Green Fruit, &c. 

H. & L. have been in business over 40 
years and have Travellers all over England. 
Highest References. SP 

The Standard 
of Excellence ! 

Always Reliable, 

Never Vary. 

If your wholesale 
grocer does not 
keep "Kent" Bot- 
tled Pickles, write 
direct to 

THE KENT CUNNING & PICKLING GO. 

CHATHAM, ONT. 

THE "Lion Brand" 

is so popular that UNSCRUPULOUS 
packers have adopted it. To prevent the 
public from being imposed on we have in 
addition lithographed the word "BOULTER" 
across the face of each label in a distinctive 
color. Look out for the word " B U l_ T ER** 
if you want first class " canned goods." 

Bay of Quinte 

Canning Factories. 

- PICTON and DEMQRESTVILLE. 

W. BOULTER & SONS, 

PROPRIETORS, 

PICTON, ONT. 




FINNAN- 



HADDIES 

Direct from Packers. 

BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDERS GET 
QUOTATIONS FROM 

L. H. DOBBIN, - MONTREAL. 



It always pays to 

BUY THE BEST 

Goods. Fresh Fruits and Vegetables can 
be had every day, by using the Lakeport 
Preserving Co's Canned Goods. All goods 
guaranteed. Try them once and you will 
use no other. 

Lakeport Preserving Co., 

Lakeport, Ont. 

Factories at Lakeport and Trenton 



" Nothing 1 succeeds like success." 

The sale of our 

BEAVER BRAND 

PICKLES 

INCREASED 

79 PER CENT. 

DURING THE LAST YEAR. 




Wishing all our Friends a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO, 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 

TORONTO. 



PAPliE PRODUCTS. 

Having large warehouses at Sherbrooke, the centre of the 
largest Maple product territory in the world. We offer to the trade, 
all Maple products of the finest quality, in quantities and packages 
suited to any locality. Special inducements on car lots. 

Address 

Sherbrooke Maple Product Co., 

Sherbrooke, P. Q., Canada. 




DAILEY'S 

Please try them. 
His boys eat them. 

Prepared by the 

Kingsville 
Preserving Co., 

(LIMITED.) 

KINGSVILLE, ONT. 



Boy 

Brand 

Tomatoes 




BUYERS ! 



OUR interests are identi- 
cal. It has paid us to pack 
a superior quality of Canned 
Goods. It will pay you to 
sell them. Our sales for 
1892 have doubled 1891. 
You may double yours by securing now, while the 
price is right and stock fresh and complete, a full 
assortment of our leading lines. 

All of which is guaranteed strictly Al. 

Delhi Fruit ^Vegetable Canning Co., 

FACTORIES : Delhi, Ont, and Niagara on the Lake. 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MARKETS.— Continued 

York drummers. The future market seems 
very uncertain. There is a large quantity of 
fruit still in Florida, and advices from most 
points report that both growers and specula- 
tors have ceased shipping for the present 
and show a disposition to hold back their 
fruit for the February market. It is hoped 
that the market will not be overstocked then. 
— N. Y. Commercial Bulletin. 

Professor James F. Babcock, the well- 
known chemical expert, tor many years State 
Assayer for Massachusetts, recently purch- 
ased in open market a sample of Walter 
Baker & Co.'s Breakfast Cocoa, and after 
making a careful analysis, filed a certificate 
in which he says: " I find that Walter Baker 
& Co.'s Breakfast Cocoa is absolutely pure. 
It contains no trace of any substance foreign 
to the pure roasted cocea-bean. The color 
is that of pure cocoa ; the flavor is natural, 
and not artifical : and the product is in every 
particular such as must have been produced 
from the pure-cocoa bean without the addi- 
tion af any chemical, akali, acid or artifical 
flavoring substance, \vhich are to be detected 
in cocoas prepared by the so-called "Dutch 
Process." 



PETROLEUM. 



Canadian refined is unchanged at 14 to 
i4^c, and all othei prices remain at quota- 
tions in Prices Currant. 

The Petrolia Advertiser reports : Petrolia 
cruae $1.18 per barrel ; Oil Springs crude 
$1.19 per barrel. The past week havingbeen 
devoted to the joys and pleasures extended 
to us by old Father Xmas, matters of busi- 
ness pertaining to oil have been given a rest. 
The price of crude is nominally $1.18, but 
there has been hardly any business doing 
and it is not much likely there will be until 
the commencement of the New Year, 1893. 
BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

Large rolls are in liberal supply and sell- 
ing at 16 to 17c. Grades below the best 
are taken at 13 to 14c. Good dairy tub is 
still a scarce article and easily brings 18 to 
19c, if it is really first-class. A cent more 
is possible. Bakers are paying good prices 
as well for grades suitable to their purposes, 
14 to 15c. being the quotation current for 
such tub butter as is in request on baking 
account. The butter market continues to 
favor sellers, and could make room for a 
good supply of tubs without any effect upon 
the price. 

Cheese is firm at 11 to nj4c for fall 
stock. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Are selling out of store at $1.30 
to $1.40, according as they are not or are 
hand picked. 




We sell It ! So do all the best Wholesale Grocers in Canada, 

The St. Croix Soap Mf g Co., 



Branches : 

MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 

TORONTO : Wright & Copp, 40 Wellington St. East. 

WINNIPEG: E. W. Ashley. 



St. Stephen, N.B., 



Dried Apples— The price is steady at 
4j£c at which the outward movement has 
been large lately. 

Evaporated Apples— Are quiet at from 
6% to 7c. 

Eggs — The price is now firm at 20 to 22c. 
for fresh eggs, while cold storage sell at 18 
to 19c, and limed at 14'^ to 15c. 

Honey— Trade is dull at 7 to 10c. for ex- 
tracted and 13 to 16c. for sections. 

Hops — There is little trade, with the 
prices ranging from 17 to 19c. 

Onions — Are dull at $2.<;o per barrel. 
Cold weather affects delivery and makes the 
price firm. 

Potatoes— The market is in a healthy 
state. Cold weather has reduced the offer- 
ings. Cars go at 70 to 75c. on spot. The 
price out of store is 8cc. 

Dressed Poultry— Turkeys are 10 to 
ioj^c. per lb., geese 6% to 7c, ducks are 60 
to 80c. a pair, chickens 35 to 50c. 

HOGS AND PROVISIONS. 

Hogs are still high and hard to get. Pack- 
ers have not pursued the stand-off policy to 
any extent, as it is noticeable that all stock 
offering is accepted. Select weights are 
$7.65 on spot, but sales have been made for 
delivery next week at $7.70. Long clear has 
made another big advance. Lard also is 
higher. 

Bacon — Long clear 9^ to 10c. Smoked 
backs are 12c, bellies 13c. to 13%., rolls 10c. 

Hams— Are 12 to i2^c. 



Lard — Pure Canadian is 1 1 %c. in tubs, 
and iij^c. in pails and ioj^to itc. in tierces. 
Compound is 9c. 

Barrel Pork— U.S. heavy mess is $17.- 
50. to $18. Canadian short cut is $18.50 
to $19. 

Dressed Meats — Beef feres are 5 to 6c. 
hindquarters 7 to 8Xc, veal 6% to 8c, mut- 
ton 6% to 7c, lamb 7c. to 8>^c. 
GREEN FRUIT. 

The fruit trade is quiet. The demand was 
pretty well exhausted before the close of the 
year, and cold weatherprevents free shipping. 
Jamaica oranges are $4 50 to $5. Jamaicas are 
$5 to $5.50 in barrels and $3 to $3.50 in boxes. 
Florida oranges are $3.25 to $3.50. Fancy 
Floridas— Mandarines and Tangerines— are 
quoted at from $3.50 to $4. Lemons are $3.25 
to $4.50. Bananas are $1.75 to $2. Pine- 
apples are 20 to 30c. Malaga grapes are 
$7 to $8. Fancy cranberries are $9 per bar- 
rel. North Shore stock is offered in baskets 
at 75 to 90c. Apples are plentiful at $1.50 
$2.50 per barrel. 

FISH AND OYSTERS. 

The sales of fish are still light, under a 
quiet demand. Stocks are likely to be none 
too full for Lent, as there is a limited stock in 
the. frozen state. Manitoba white fish is 
7%c-, other whitefish is 7c, and salmon trout 
is the same price. Lake herring are $2 to 
$2.50 per hundred. Sea herring is 5c. Steak 
cod is 6y 2 to 7c. Market cod is 4^c. Cod- 
fish, skinned and boned, sells at byic, and 
is in fair request. Labrador herring is $6, 
shore herring $5 to $5.50, and Digby 11 to 
I2^c. per lb., boneless fish is 4c, boneless 
cod is 7 to 8c. Oysters are $1.25. 



TORONTO, - - Dec. 30, '92. 

WE -PAYING ARE 



4 



3 

4f.o. 



FOR I "T r.w.B. 

BRIGHT--DRY--SOUND 

NEW CROP 

DRIED APPLES. 



we BUYING are 

N EW 

DRIED APPLES- 



ADDRESS 

STANWAY & BAYLEY, 

42 FRONT ST., EAST, TORONTO. 



-TERMS- 

PRICE— Good for one week from 
date, for not exceeding 10 Bar- 
rels from any one shipper. Lar- 
ger lots subject to confirmation 
before shipment. All others can 
be made without advice, but 
subject terms stated. 

SIGHT DRAFT— Or local pay-or- 
ders honoured, 10 days afier 
shipment made. 

QUALITY-Bright, dry, and sound, 
new -crop stock. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 




Florida, 

Jamaica, 

Valencia, 

Mandarines, 

Tangerines. 

LEMONS. NUTS. PRUNES. 

COCOANUTS. FIGS. DATES 

CRANBERRIES. BANANAS. 



CLEMES BROS 



Phone 1766. 



TORONTO, ONT. 




Daniel G. Trench & Co., 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
CANNING FACTORY OUTFITTERS. 

GENERAL AGENTS FOR 

SPRACUE MFC. CO., FABNHAM, N. Y 



CANNING MACHINERY of all kinds. 




THEY ARE RIGHT. 

We have packed all kinds of Vegetables, Fruits, 
etc , and our CANNED GOODS are in the hands 
of the wholesalers. 

Our Factory New Throughout. 

The Strathroy Canning and Pre- 
serving Co., Ltd., 
STRATHROY, - ONT. 



CC 



English 
Malt 

Six GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

GILLARD'S Specialties 

High Class, English Made, 

IsTIE^W^ Pickles and "ISTIE^T" Sauce. 

f>\\ I ARH A/ OH Wallhamstow, London, Eng., and of 
*-" "LnnU OO V^\-/«, Wholesale Grocers in the Dominion. 



SWEET CIDER 

Clarified and Filtered Sweet Cider, 15 cts. per gallon, any 
size Packages from 5 gallons to 40 gallons, and Pack- 
ages returnable at same price as charged. 



Pure Cider Vinegar, 

Pure Fruit Jellies in 28 pound pails, 

Pure Fruit Jams in 28 pound pails, 

No Charge for Pails. 



18c. per gallon- 
6c. per pound. 
8c. per pound. 



Cider is warranted to keep sweet and nice until next May. 
Send in your orders at once. 

ERIE PRESERVING CO., 

ST CATHARINES, ONT. 

"J ersey B rand" C ondensed Milk. 

It is guaranteed Pure and Unskimmed, 

An excellent food for Infants. 

We make only the one quality — THE BEST. 

Buy only the JERSEY BRAND for all pur 

poses. Sold by Grocers, Outfitters and others. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FORREST CANNING CO'Y, 

HALIFAX, N.S 

STANWAY & BAYLEY, Agents, Toronto. 





W. A. Carson. 



B. B. Morden. 



J. Anning. 



BELLEVILLE CANNING CO. 



-PACKEBS OF THE- 



"Queen Brand" 

Fruits and Vegetables. 

All our goods are packed with the greatest care and clean- 
liness, and as we are on the market to stay we will only 



put out 

FIRST-CLASS GOODS. 

We respectfully ask the trade to recom- 
mend this brand to their customers: 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MONTREAL MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 5, 1893. 

[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, and' a- prices are modified by both quan- 
tity and quality, the quotations given below, and 
in our Prices Current, necessarily take a wide 
range.] 

GROCERIES 

Between the two holidays no one expected 
any large volume of business, but on the 
whole the wholesale grocery trade has ex- 
perienced a fair holiday business at steady 
prices. Tea has been enquired for and a 
larger volume of business is reported. Values 
on dried fruit have been somewhat irregular, 
in consequence of inferior offerings, but on 
really good lines a moderate trade was done 
on a fairly steady basis. Syrups and mo- 
lasses have moved fairly well with no change 
to note, and altogether the grocery trade 
have not much cause for complaint with the 
business that has been done. It is worthy 
of remark, also, that a healthy tone pervades 
in all staple lines, notably in sugar, and re- 
finers will not consider any request for com- 
mission at all, claiming that they are per- 
fectly satisfied to wait until business comes 
to them, as it must do, for they consider that 
supplies in third hands throughout the coun- 
try cannot be large. Few people talk about 
payments, and the presumption is, therefore, 
that they are satisfactory on the whole. 

SUGARS. 

It looks as though buyers had concluded 
that it was not policy to hold off much lon- 
ger, for there were attempts to negotiate 
some contracts for large quantities for future 
delivery at former prices, but the refiners 
would not consent to binding themselves 
to anything in the face of the position of 
the market for raw material, Some granu- 
lated was moved at 4>£c. from the re- 
fineries and some yellows at 3^ to 4c. for 
bright and 3X to 3#c. for lower grades, 
but on Tuesday the price went up yic, and 
granulated is now 4>6c. at the refineries, and 
yellow quotes firm at 3%c. 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

There has not been much doing in syrups 
since our last report, but a few lots of choice 
domestic have been moved at 2 to 2^c. in 
the wood. A sale of American stock was 
also made at 23c. 

Molasses is quiet, with no new sales to re- 
port. For a round lot of Barbadoes, how- 
ever, 32^c. is the first figure obtainable now 
from any holder. 

TEAS. 

Buyers appear to recognize that it is hope- 
less to hold off any longer in tea, and the 
consequence of this has been sales of some 
round lots of Japans during the week, some 
2000 packages in the aggregate changing 
hands since our last at a basis ranging from 
15 to 19c, and sales of choicer grades have 
been made all the way from 21 to 30c. 
COFFEE. 

Coffee has ruled somewhat unsettled in 
sympathy with the feeling in New York but 
with light stocks here, prices are nominally 
the same as they were. We quote nominally 
Jamaica 18 to i8^c, Rio 19 to 21c, Mara- 
caibo i8>£ to 20c, Java 22 to 25c, an 
Mocha 23 to 25c. for straight lots. * 

SPICES. 

Spices are unchanged, a fair trade being 
done in pepper at 7 to 7%c. Cloves rule 



steady at jy 2 to 8Xc- and nutmegs have 
changed hands from 50c. to $1.00 according 
to quality. 

RICE. 

The rice market is quiet as usual and 
prices do not show any change. We 
quote : Standard, $3. 8 s to $4 ; Louisiana, 
$5.25 to $5.50; choice Burmah, 4 to 4J^c; 
Japans $4.50 to $5; Patnas, $5.25 to $5.50; 
Carolina, $7 to $8. 

NUTS. 

The demand on holiday account having 
been satisfied business in nuts is on the 
quiet side. Prices are nominally unchanged. 
Pecans 1 itoi2Xc.,Terragonaalmondsi6^c, 
Grenoble walnuts \y/ z to i4,^c.,filberts 10 to 
ioj£c, Ivica I4>^c., Brazil 15c, marbots 
i2^c, cocoa nuts $3.50 to $4.50 per bag of 
100 for old, new $5 to $5.50. 

DRIED FRUITS. 

The stock of inferior goods offering has 
led to some low priced sales, 4% to 4^c. 
being mentioned in some lots, but buyers 
can depend for a certainty that no really 
good to choice stock can be touched at any 
such figure. In fact we note sales of 
straight wholesale lots of prime Valencia 
offstalk at 5c. and seconds 4 % c. so that it 
is easy to see no jobber could job out for 
less than a % to y%c. advance on this basis. 
Currants are steady for 5^ to SH C > as to 
package in straight lots. 
FRUIT. 

The movement in green fruit etc. has been 
beyond the average for the holiday season, 
but it is quieting down somewhat now. Lo- 
cal quotations are as follows : Valencia 
oranges, $4.25 for small boxes and $5.25 for 
large ; Messina lemons, $2.25 to $3 ; Florida 
oranges, bright good counts, $3.25 to $3.50 ; 
bright Florida russets, $3 to $3.30 ; Jamaica 
oranges, $3 per box and $5.25 per brl ; Lang- 
erenes, $3.50 ; grape fruit, $3.25 ; cocoanuts, 
$4.50 ; fancy dates, 5>£c ; fancy figs, 12c ; 
choice cranberries, $9.50 to $10 per brl. 
APPLES. 

The local market is quiet, but we note 
sales of car lots at $2.25 to $2.50 asto quality. 
Some holders here have made turnovers in 
Chicago on lots sent there from the west at 
$2.40 to $2.50, which stands them a loss. 
POTATOES. 

The potato market has been quiet and 
steady at 80 to 85c for car lots of choice early 
rose. 

POULTRY. 

The demand for poultry was good until 
the very close of the week, but has been 
quieter since. We quote turkeys ioj£ to 
ii}4c., geese 6 to 6^c, ducks 8 to 8j£c, 
chickens 7% to 8c. 

PROVISIONS. 

Provisions continue quiet with only a job- 
bing movement. We quote as follows : 
Canadian short cut, per brl. $19 to $20 ; 
Mess pork, Western, new, per brl $19 to 
$20.00 ; Hams, city cured, per brl. 11 to 
i2j£c ; Lard, Canadian, in pails 9 to 9%c ; 
Bacon, per lb., 11 to 12c. ; Lard, com, re- 
fined, per lb., 8^ to 8^c. 
EGGS. 

Eggs rule steady at 14 >£ to 17c. according 
to quality. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

There has been nothing new in butter 
since our last, but prices are nominally un- 
changed. We quote : Late made fall 
creamery, 23 to 23,^0; earlier makes 22c; 
Townships 20 to 21c; Morrisburg and 
Brockville 18 to 19c; Western dairy 17 to 
1 8c. 

Cheese is now in few hands and firmly 
held ai lie. 



THE SCARCITY OF HOGS. 

Reports from all over the United States 
indicate an unprecedented dullness in the 
packing industry. Men have been dis- 
charged by the thousand from points hitherto 
regarded as the great centers of the busi- 
ness. Plants are being operated at, in some 
cases, less than half their capacity, and all 
this has been brought about by the scarcity 
of hogs. 

Statistics lately compiled show that the 
hog receipts for given months in the current 
winter fall below the corresponding period 
of last year by over one million hogs, and 
consequently there is a proportionate falling 
off in the work done by the packers. 

Leading packers acknowledge that there 
seems but little chance of immediate relief, 
and that the shortage is becoming every day 
more apparent. 

Many and divers reasons are given for the 
shortage. Some say heavy rains have been 
the cause. Others contend that the low 
prices of product early in the spring made 
farmers careless, and instead of keeping their 
hogs, as they usually do, until the holidays, 
they fattened them on corn early and sent 
them to the market. With these and many 
other solutions of the difficulty, however, the 
fact remains that the scarcity prevails, and 
prices for products must sooner or later be 
affected The home market will probably 
feel the trouble keenly. — National Pro- 
visioned 



HOW TEA IS SORTED. 

Tea sorting is one of the common occupa- 
tions of young girls in tea farming districts 
of Japan, says an English exchange. They 
carefully pick out all the seeds, weeds, bits 
of bark and other rubbish that unavoidably 
fall into baskets during the picking. 

The sorting is done after the tea leaves 
have been fired — that is, dried by being 
placed in a tray with a stout paper bottom 
and shaken over a charcoal fire for a time, 
and then placed on the top ot an oven built 
for that purpose, when the drying operatives 
twist the leaves by hand. 

The pickers, besides taking out the rub- 
bish, in many cases sort the leaves into dif- 
ferent grades, the better qualities being tak- 
en out and sold at very remunerative prices. 
The Japanese teas are divided into eight 
grades, but unfortunately the best of tbem 
are not sent to Great Britain. 

After the tea has been dried and is ready 
for picking, it is carefully sifted, and then 
packed in lead-lined chests and in caddies. 
The dust from the sifting is saved, and large 
quantities of it are sent to America every 
year. The dust only costs about sixpence a 
pound wholesale, and by careful admixture 
with good tea can be made to retail at two 
and sixpence. 



Restore goods to their proper places as s en 
after using as possible 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



23 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

TORONTO. 

The flour market remains dull and un- 
changed. There is a feeling the present 
prices are likely to be improved on, as the 
depression appears to depend on conditions 
of over supply that are exaggerated. Prices 
continue as below : 

Flour. — City millers' and*dealers' prices 
are: Manitobajpatents, $4.60; strong bakers' 
$4.25 ; white wheat patents, $4.50 ; straight 
roller, $3. 40; low grades, per bag, $1.25 to 
$1.50. 

Car prices are : Toronto freights — Mani- 
toba patents, $4.35 to$445 ; Manitoba 
strong bakers' $3.90 to $4.10; Ontario 
patents, $3.40 to $3.50 ; straight roller, $3.00 
to $3.20 ; extra, $2.60 tc $2.70; low grades, 
perbag, $1.00 to $1.50. 

Meal— Oatmeal is $3.80. Cornmeal is 

$3- So- 
Feed— Bran is $11. 50 to $12, shorts $12.50 

to $13 mixed feed $22, feeding corn 57 to 

58c, oats 29 to 310 
Hay— Baled timothy is $9. 
Straw— Is steady at $5.5010 $6. 

MONTREAL. 
There has been no material change in 
flour during the week, and buyers show the 
same indifference as ever. As a consequence 
only a tew jobbing sales are made. We quote: 
Patent, winter $3.95 to $4.15 ; patent, spring 
$4.20 to $4.35 ; straight rollers $3.45 to $3.65, 
extra $3.00 to $3. 15 ; superfine $2.60 to 2.85; 
city strong bakers $4.00 to 4.10 ; strong 
bakers $4.00 to $4.10 ; oatmeal $2.05 to $2.10 
bran $14 ; shorts $15. 



Unlike tn Dutch Process 
No Alkalies 




Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

W. Baler k Co.'s 



Breakfast Cocoa, 



which is absolutely pure 

and soluble. 

A description of the chocolate 
plant, and of the various cocoa 
and chocolate preparations man- 
ufactured by Walter Baker & Co. 
will be sentfree to any dealer on 
application. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters translated from or written in any 
foreign language. 

J. H. CAMERON, 10 Front St. E. 

The Western Milling Company 

(Limited.) 

REGINA, ASSA. 

Manufactuiers of all kinds of 

High Grade Flours, 
Hungarian Patent, 
and Strong Bakers. 

We also handle Hard Wheat, Oats, and 
other kinds of feed. 

We would solicit the patronage of the 
Millers' of the Eastern Provinces, wanting 
Manitoba Hard Wheat. All orders en- 
trusted to us will be carefully and promptly 
filled. 



Correspondence Solicited. 

Embro 
Oatmeal 
Mills 

D. R. ROSS, - - EMBRO, ONT. 

A CHOICE QUALITY OF 

Roller, Standard and Granulated 

Oatmeal 

IN BARRELS , HALF BARR ELS OR BAGS. 

Selected WHITE OATS only used. For prices 
of Oatmeal or Oathullsin Car-loadsor less quan- 
tities, write or wire, and will reply promptly. 
Can ship via Canadian Pacific or Grand Trunk 
Railways. 



OATMEAL 



Dominion Mills. 

LONDON. 

Excelsior Mills. 

MITCHELL. 

Write or wire for Thomson's Brands 

ROLLED OATS, PINHEAD & STANDARD MEALS. 
SPLIT PEAS, POT BARLEY, CORN MEAL, ETC. 

All kinds of Chop and Mill Feed. 

ceNeRal CRaiN Dealer. 

Highest price paid for Oats and Peas in car lots. 

WALTER THOMSON, 



London and 

Mitchell. 



BRANDON ROLLER MILLS. 

Brandon, Man. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hungarian, Patent, Strong Bakers 

- FLOUR -■ 

Also Oatmeal, Boiled Oats, Rolled Oatmea 

Granulated and Standard. 

Dealers in all kinds of grain and feed. 

ALEXANDER, KELLY & COY, 

PROPRIETORS. 

N.WENGER&BROS., 

AYTON, ONT. 

- - MILLERS - - 

(Hungarian Process) 



BRANDS = 

KLEBER, MAY BL OSSOM. 

AGENTS = 
J. L. SMITH & SON, - Montreal. 
EPHRAIM ERB, - Halifax. 



R. M. PINCOMBE. 



W. W. SUTHERLAND. 



W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. U.S.A. 
Branch House, 6 Hospital St., Montreal. 



STRATHROY OATMEAL AND CORNMEAL MILLS. 

Pincombe & Sutherland, 

STEATHROT", OZDTT^A-IRIO- 

Manufacture by the latest improved process 

The Celebrated White Eagle Brand of Rolled Oatmeal, 
also Standard and Granulated Oatmeal, CORNMEAL, Dessicated Rolled Wheat and 
Wheat Germ, put up in barrels, half barrels and bags. Write or wire us for samples and 
prices. 

N.B.— The only mills putting up Rolled Oatmeal in Cotton Bags. 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



EXPORTING COFFEE. 

Coffee is not a shrub, as is generally sup- 
posed, but a tree, which, if allowed to go 
untrimmed, would attain twenty feet or more 
in height, but which is generally kept down 
to eight or ten feet for convenience in pick- 
ing. A grove can be started by burying the 
berries or from slips. The latter are prefer- 
able, placed about six feet apart, and those 
plants which have been taken from the 
nursery with considerable earth around their 
roots will bear fruit in two years, though 
their full yield is not attained under four 
years. It is calculated that 1,000 th-ifty 
trees will yield on a fair average 3,200 
pounds of coffee per annum, but in some 
parts of San Paulo province the yield is as 
high as 6,500 pounds. There are two and 
sometimes three harvests to a year, but after 
fifteen or twenty years the old trees must be 
cut down to give place to new ones. 

When fully ripe the berry is about the size, 
shape and color of a large cranberry. The 
tough red skin incloses two grains or seeds. 
The old way of preparing it for market, still 
much used in Brazil, was as follows : When 
the berries have acquired a rich blood red 
they are picked into bags by the negroes, 
twenty-three pounds being considered a fair 
days work for one picker. The bags are 
then emptied on theterreno or drying place, 
which is generally a piece of ground beaten 
smooth or covered with cement. After a few 
days in the sun the outer skin becomes black 
hard and shriveled, and then the berries are 
pounded in huge wooden mortars until the 
skins are broken without injuring the tough 
grains. 

By sifting, the skins and grains are separ- 
ated and the latter are again spread out in 
the sun until the pellicle enveloping each 
grain is dry as dust. Then they are again 
subjected to the mortars and the winnowing 
fan, and are ready for sale or immediate con- 
sumption. The improved method now in 
vogue on the wealthier estates consists in 
drying the freshly picked grains on wooden 
trays or pavements, by which they escape 
the earthy flavor acquired when dried on the 
bare ground, and the outer and inner envel- 
opes are removed by passing them thiough 
two mills. 

The main feature of the first mill is a 
horizontal copper cylinder, whose surface is 
roughened after the manner of a rasp. It 
revolves against a board, between which and 
the teeth space is left for the grains to pass, 
but not the husks. The grains drop into 
water and are left to soak twelve hours, in 
which time the parchment-like 'film that en- 
velopes each seed is softened. They are 
spread ont again on trays in the sun, and 
when thoroughly dry are passed through the 
second mill, which resembles those used for 
grinding plaster, except that the two vertical 
rolling disks are of wood, six feet in diame- 
ter and five inches thick, their light weight 
abrading the pellicles without injuring the 



grains. Then the fanner is brought into 
requisition and the berries are put in bags for 
transpoitation. 

The freight on a sack of coffee (138 
pounds) is about 1 cent per mile ; therefore, 
coffee coming from the end of the Dom 
Pedro II railway must pay in the neighbor- 
hood of $4 per sack for transportation to the 
shipping point — one-third of its value when 
delivered in Rio. From Rio to New York 
the freight rarely exceeds 60 cents a sack, 
and it is often as low as 25 cents. Thus fifty 
miles of railroad carriage in the country 
where it grows costs more than 5,200 miles 
of ocean. Many of the planters still send 
their coffee to market by mule train, con- 
sidering that the cheaper way of transporta- 
tion. 

The entrance into Santos of a mule train 
from the interior is something worth seeing. 
The train is always preceeded by a white 
horse wearing a string of bells, and the 
mules obediently follow the leader. Some- 
times troops of several hundred arrive in a 
morning, and again there are weeks when 
none appear. Every mule brings two bags of 
coffee on his back. Having made long, slow 
journeys, often hundreds of miles, the animals 
are pitiable looking objects when their bur- 
dens are removed, for the constant sawing of 
the loads has not only abraded the skin, but 
in many instances ground off the flesh to the 
bone. 

The bags are dumped in huge piles in the 
custom house yards, and around them carga- 
dores immediately collect like swarms of 
black bees. There is an export duty to pay, 
and every bag must be pierced and a sample 
withdrawn in order to determine the quality 
and the duty thereon. The tariff, based on 
the market price, is regulated anew every 
Saturday. 

The sampling instrument is a brass tube, 
shaped exactly like a pen. When the point 
is pushed into a sack of coffee the berries 
run down through the tube, and after a hand- 
ful has been abstracted the instrument is 
withdrawn and its point turned over like a 
crotchet hook, thus closing the opening. 
The operation occupies only a few seconds, 
and the " samples " taken out amount to 
many tons in the course of a year. They, 
together with all samples of exported sugars, 
are presented to the lepers' hospital. 

The gangs of cargodores employed in 
" toting" the coffee away from the custom 
house and loading it upon waiting vessels are 
a feature of Santos. Naked, except from 
waist to knees, their chocolate colored hides 
glisten in the sun and their well-cultivated 
muscles stand out like whipcords. Each 
gang has its leader, generally the tallest and 
most powerful negro among them, who car- 
ries a rattle, to the music of which his follow- 
ers keep step in a rapid jog trot, singing a 
low, monotonous song meanwhile, in words 
to us unintelligible. Sometimes the rattle 
gives place to a small flag.— Ex. 



THE PATRONIZING MERCHANT. 

There is nothing so ridiculous and so 
easily descernable in a merchant as an air of 
patronage towards customers. It is a species 
of vanity which is as ludicrous as it is dis- 
agreeable. This weakness is called bump- 
tiousness, and is repelling to the general run 
of customers, who are quick to distinguish 
it from a pleasant presence. A pleasant 
presence in the store is one of the essentials 
^towards the success of a merchant. This 
essential of a pleasant presence is made up 
of simplicity. Just that and nothing else. 
Simplicity is the most charming of all quali- 
ties and is and always has been possessed by 
the men and women that the world deems 
great. The simple man is natural and is 
possessed of a suavity which is real. As- 
sumed suavity is generally made up of bump- 
tiousness and is as different from the inher- 
ent quality as the sweet violet is different 
from the violet of the millinery counter. 

The bumptuous merchant in his vanity 
reckons himself somewhat of a philanthro- 
pist. His behaviour towards his customers 
is offensive to those amongst them who are 
of a keen or sensitive nature. In his over- 
weening vanity he reckons himself the pat- 
ron and the customer the beneficiary. Every 
action of his conveys that expression. When 
he is sympathetic he is condescendingly so ; 
heartiness is luring and often vulgar ; his in- 
sincerity is apparent, for humanity is a dis- 
tinctive judge of disposition and character. 
The patronising merchant is a humbug. — 
Ex. 

A retail grocer in Minneapolis recently 
said, as reported by the Northwest Trade : 
"In looking over my book accounts, aggre- 
gating something like 2 f< jpo, at one time I 
found it easy to classify them as, one-third 
good pay ; one-third slow pay ; and 
one - third don't pay. Now, the first 
third of that business has some profit 
in it ; the second third, the slow pay, 
virtually ate up its own profit ; and the last, 
of course, was a dead loss. Under these 
circumstances I reached the conclusion that 
it would be good business to sell only to the 
first third, those .vho were good pay and af- 
forded some profit. I would do a small busi- 
ness but a profitable business, and I would 
count on reducing two-thirds of my ex- 
penses." 



If you want books, it is rarely wise to pay 
double price for them to a travelling book-seller 

A feather duster disperses butdoes not remove 
the dust from the store. 

A reputation for truthfulness is indispensable 
te permanent and satisfying success. 

Credit is often too cheap and overbuying far too 
common. Don't be guilty of the one, and don't 
abuse the other. 

One thing in particular shouia be impressed 
upon clerks — the necessity of careful attention to 
small customers 

The trader who pays his way must sell at a 
profit, and cannot afford to cut below others in 
the same line. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



FAMOUS 

" STAR " 

Sugar Cured Meats 

Mild, Sweet, Delicious Flavor. 

All live dealers have them. 

Be sure you have fresh stock 



F. W. FEARMAN, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



ESTABLISHED 1851 



JUST RECEIVED 

4,500 Boxes 

Valencia Raisins 

WRITE FOR OUR PRICES. 

N. QUINTAL & FILS, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

m St. Panl Street, Montreal. 



BALFOUR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF TEAS 



-AND- 



WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

HAMILTON. 



WESTERN ONTARIO AGENTS FOR THE 

Irish Mustard. 

Cherry'8 DUBLIN Mustard is guaranteed ab- 
solutely PUKE, and sold cheaper than the com- 
pound Sena for Prices. 



Raisins 

FIGS DATES 

Currants 

NUTS PEELS 

LARGE ASSORTMENT. 



J. W. LANG k CO., 

Wholesale Grocers, 
59, 61, 63 FRONT STREET EAST, 

TORONTO. 



COOKING FIGS. 

In Bags about 50 lbs. each. 
Fine Quality and Cheap. 

Sloan k Crowther 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 
I 9 Front St. E. f Toronto. 




IMS 



Our shipments now arriving ex S. S. Ar- 
dengorm and Broomhaugh, were purchased 
at the lowest point. 

Layers, very choicest quality. 

Best value in market. 



.1 

35 and 37 Front St. East, 

TORONTO, - ONT. 

'•ARRIVED* 

New Sultanas. 

SPECIAL LOT OF BAG FIGS 

DATES, PRUNES, 

GRENOBLE WALNUTS. 



SMITH & KEIGHLEY 

Wholesale Grocers, 

9 Front St. E., Toronto 

NEW 

Grenoble, Marbot 

AND* 

Bordeaux 

Walnuts 

NOW IN STOCK. 



JOHN BURGESS & SON 



SAUCE 

AND 

PICKLE 



MANUFACTURERS, 

IflT OTDAMn Corner of the Savoy 
lUl I II All U Steps, London, W.C 



Vide Sir Walter Scott's "St. 
Ronan's Well," Chaps. XVI. and 

XXX. 
Lord Byron's " Beppo," 



EDWARD ADAMS 

& CO- 

Importers of Teas 



-AND- 



PERKINS, INCE & Co., 

41-43 Front St, East, 
TORONTO. 



Wholesale Grocers 

LONDON, ONT. 

SPECIAL BRAND TEA. 

LOOK OUT FOR 

JAPAN TEA. 
Nothing equal to it at the price. 
See our travellers. 

Write for samples and prices. 

Thos. KlNNEAR & Co 

Wholesale Grocers, 

49 Front Street East, 

TOEOITTO. 

Elliott Marr& Co., 

Importers of Teas 



-AND- 



Wholesale Grocers. 



LONDON, ONT. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE SUGAR CURE. 

The following, which is translated and 
abridged Irom the Deutsche Zucker In- 
dustrie, will be good news to the sugar 
trade, whose staple is so frequently ta- 
bood by medical men. It would seem 
that we want more, and not less, sugar 
in this dyspeptic age, and, if our Ger- 
man authority be right, the remedy 
should be, "Take no more pills, nor any 
other anedicine. except Tate's Cubes." It 
may toe mentioned that grating lump 
sugar on wounds is an old and well 
known remedy in some English country 
places. 

Some years ago a pamphlet on sugar 
as a food and medicine appeared in Jena. 
As a motto it bore the saying of Claude 
Bernard, Truly everything may be refer- 
red hack to sugar. The authoress, who 
had suffered long from chronic abdominal 
eatarrh (from which she had. amongst 
other places, in vain sought relief at 
Karlsbad), was cured by sugar. She then 
studied this healing property of sugar, 
and collected in the pamphlet everything 
she could find in medical literature on 
the subject, with the following results. 
The Swiss chamois hunters on their ex- 
cursions only take bacon and sugar with 
them to restore their muscular \power 
when exhausted. Dr. Bocker, in 1849, in 
his iaccount of his numerous medical ex- 
periments, said, with regard to the ef- 
fect of sugar, that he had eaten daily 
from 200 to 600 grammes (0-40 lb. to 
1.25 lb.) of sugar and honey without suf- 
fering from indigestion, when taken with 
other suitable foods. He had a large 
practice among the poor, among whom 
chlorosis, scrofula and rickets frequent- 
ly occur, and he treated all of these mal- 
adies with sugar. Setting aside Torn's 
statement, that the Turks heal wou»ds 
by strewing sugar on them, the author- 
ess linds mention in 1666. in an article 
by Skuletus, of the healing of sores by 
that process. In the first half of our cen- 
tury sugar was much used medically, for 
thrush in the mouths of small children, 
which Hecker removed , through gentle 
rubbing with powdered sugar. It was 
also used for sores, spots of hard skin, 
ulcerated discharge from the ears, and, 
further, as a powder for the larynx. But 
the results lately obtained by Professor 
Lucke, lat Strasburg, in the treatment 
of wounds with sugar after severe ampu- 
tations, are -specially notable ; they were 
tations, are specially notable, for of 202 
patients treated with sugar only five 
died. We learn from the authoress that 
Schurmann administered small pieces of 
sugar as the best, and, in fact, the only 
remedy (against Asiatic cholera. It is a 
pity, she adds, that those who tested 
the vitality of the cholera germs in beer, 
wine, and other drinks, were not led by 
this remark to try a solution of sugar 
in rtheir experiments. A second treatise 
by the same lady with the motto, "Sugar 
Heals," was published in 1892 (by Her- 
man feriegen, at Berlin), and called " A 
New Bemedy for Stomach Complaints." 
Leading physicians have given the writer 
(in tthe D. Z. I.) verbal confirmation of 



the truth of the authoress' statements, 
that in the last two years many persons 
suffering from nervous stomach com- 
plaints have obtained happy results from 
the sugar cure, whilst most have been 
greatly relieved by it. The authoress 
adjures the reader, further on, to aid him- 
self fby taking sugar as the one cure. 
Through taking it the patient can alone 
obtain relief from his sufferings, whether 
they consist of acidity, pains in the stom- 
ach or heartburn ; by the use of sugar 
these conditions and their recurrence can 
be lastingly prevented. Amongst nervous 
stomach complaints which can be cured 
by taking sugar, I place all those sick- 
nesses which doctors do not consider in- 
fectious, and also those where no cancer 
or similar disease is present. In all other 
cases, lor example, in debility leading to 
enlargement of the stomach, as well as 
in simple colds, sugar will brilliantly 
prove Its healing power." 

Under the heading "How shall the pa- 
tients eat sugar ?" we receive detailed in- 
formation from the authoress concerning 
the Sugar cure. The patients are advised 
at first to take not less than 100 and nev- 
er over 250 grammes of sugar (say 1-4 
lb. to 1-2 lb.). Everyone will then be 
able to test, by himself, whether he has 
taken the necessary amount of sugar for 
the regulation of his digestion. The sugar 
is to be taken in small pieces (cubes or 
dice), with a little water drunk directly 
afterwards, or as sugar water (eau su- 
cree). Usually 10 to 15 grammes of sugar 
are taken after breakfast, but the chief 
quantity, perhaps 50 to 100 grammes (2 
oz. to 4 oz.), must be taken after the main 
meal of the day. The patient must al- 
ways have sugar at hand, so that, in the 
case of any discomfort, acidity, oppres- 
sion, or pains, he can take at any mo- 
ment one or more pieces, according to his 
experience. Sugar water (eau sucree) has 
also frequently proved itself beneficial as 
a table drink, so that former recurring 
discomforts cease completely, or are con- 
siderably relieved. The authoress refers 
to the celebrated Hafeland, who writes : 

" After too heavy a meal I have very 
often removed all indisposition by two 
loths (about 40 grammes) of sugar dis- 
solved in water. If one feels unwell to- 
wards evening, one should take 50 to 
100 grammes of sugar in hot water, or, 
if inclined to nausea, in cold water. The 
favorable effects of the sugar do not show 
themselves for a few weeks, and, in very 
severe cases, for a few months. Appetite, 
sleep, and appearance improve ,and an 
increase of weight follows, which latter, 
however, can be controlled. He who has 
once accustomed himself to the use of 
sugar never likes entirely to give it up." 
The authoress has taken 100 grammes of 
sugar daily for the last 10 years, and 
has increased in weight by one third, 
while hefore the cure she was emaciated. 
According to her, the widespread opinion 
that sugar spoils the teeth is erroneous. 
Eating delicacies hard to digest, such as 
confectionery, is what causes decay. On 
the contrary, it is said of a learned man, 
Mallory, that he ate great quantities of 
sugar, and had magnificent teeth till he 
was very old. Another learned man, Pro- 
fessor Aston, of Edinburgh, is of the opin- 
ion that he owes his remarkably line 
teeth to sugar eating. Both of the au- 
thoress' pamphlets tend to show that 
6ugar is to be considered as a nourishing 
food, and not as a delicacy. Comparing 
the consumption of sugar per head in 
England, where it is far heavier than in 
Germany, she adds that the strength and 
endurance of the English race is owing to 
their diet, and, in this direction, to the 
use of sugar. The opinion of the author- 



ess is comprised in the axiom, " To eat 
more sugar is good for all ; to eat much 
sugar is good for invalids." — Produce 
Markets' Review. 



SARDINES. 

But a portion of the little fish that 
are sold as sardines are entitled to the 
name. Sprats, herrings and pilchards, all 
inferior in delicacy to the true sardine* 
are imposed upon the consumer under 
false colors. They are excellent and valu- 
able articles of food, but they are not 
sardines. The excellence of so-called sar- 
dones depends first, upon the genuine- 
ness of the fish itself ; and next, upon 
the quality of oil in which it is preserved. 
Pure olive oil is an essential ; with any 
other the delicate flavor of the fish is de- 
stroyed. Adulterated and inferior oil is 
used to a great extent in the preserva- 
tion of sardines, and a rank and coarse 
flavor results. The consumer should al- 
ways select brands whose reputation is a 
guarantee of quality. 

Sardines are abundant in the Mediter- 
ranean and the Bay of Biscay, and are 
also found in the Atlantic ocean, although 
not as far north as England. 

Sardines are exported to the most dis- 
tant parts of the world, cured in oil, in 
tin (boxes. To cure them, they are first 
carefully washed, then sprinkled in fine 
salt, and after a few hours, the head, 
gills, etc., are removed ; they are then 
washed again, and spread out on willow 
branches or wire work, exposed to the 
sun and wind if the weather is dry> but 
in damp and rainy weather to a cur-,, 
rent of air under cover. They are next 
put into boiling oil, in which they remain 
for a short time, and when they are 
taken out the oil is drained away from 
them as much as possible, and they are 
put into the familiar tin boxes. The box- 
es being filled with sardines, oil is poured 
in, the lid soldered on, and they are plac- 
ed for a short time in boiling water 
or exposed to hot steam. The boxes that 
have leaked or burst in boiling are re- 
jected and those that remain sound are 
ready for the market. Dj. the south of 
France sardines are sometimes cured in 
red wine, and those so cured are Sar- 
dines Anchoisees, or anchovied sardines. 

There seems to be no good reason why 
the sprat of the British coast should not 
be cured in oil like that of the west 
coast of France, and so prove a new, 
source of wealth, besides probably being 
brought at a lower price to market* 
to the advantage of those for whom sar- 
dines are at present too expensive. Sev- 
eral species of small Clupeidae, which re- 
semble the sardine, are found in different 
parts of the world, and are used the 
same as sardines of the Mediterranean. 
One species frequents the south and east 
coast of Ceylon in such vast shoals that 
400,000 have been taken at a single haul 
of the net in a little bay, and when the 
shoal approached the shore the broken 
water (became as smooth as if a sheet of 
ice had been floating below the surface. 
-Ex. 



A customer secured Is a promise of greater sal- 
ary in time. 

''There are geniuses in trade, as well as in war 
or the state, or letters ; and the reason why this 
or that man is fortunate is not to be told. It lies 
in the man," — Emerson. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 




TRADE 

MARK 



INDIGENOUS INDIAN TO PLANT. 



SPECIAL BLEND 

PAGKED BY 

THE KDRMA TEA ESTATE, 

SYLHET, INDIA. 

Yz lb. and i lb. Packages an 5 lb. Tins. 



DAVIDSON & MAY, 



36 YONGE ST. 



Sole Agents for Canada, 

TORONTO. 




WE ORIGINATED THE PROCESS 

Whereby all the nutriment and relishing properties of milk are extracted, canned and 
sterilized to keep perfectly in all climates. Sold by all wholesale grocers under our 

Highland Brand Evaporated Cream 

Pleases all who appreciate a perfect quality of pure (unsweetened) milk or cream. Sur- 
passes cream for coffee, and thoroughly takes the place of unprepared 
milk or cream for all purposes. Prepared by 

HELVETIA MILK CONDENSING CO., 

HIGHLAND, ILL., U.S.A. 



WRIGHT & COPP, Ontario Agents. 

Toronto 



L. H. DOBBIN, Montreal, 

Quebec Agent. 



EPPS'S COCOA 

H lb. packets, 14 lb. boxes secured in tin 
Special Agent tor the Dominion : 

C. E. Colson, Montreal 

zivcTXisnsrs 

Famous 

Boneless Codfish 

NEW and GENUINE. 

NOW ARRIVING. 
Packed in assorted Boxes, 5-lbs., 10-lbs., 
20-lbs , and 40-lbs., containing 1 and 2 lb. 
Bricks, also 

Skinless Codfish 

Packed m 100 lb. Boxes, Whole Fish. 

Delightful thick Codfish Steak. 

Orders can be filled at short notice after this. 

Stewart, Munn & Co., 
MONTREAL. 





N. B.— The old Standard Brand of 
HORSESHOE Canned Salmon still 
cakes the lead, and affords the greatest satis- 
faction to both dealer and consumer, and for 
uniform excellence in quality and weight 
has no equal. 

EVERY CAN WARRANTED. 



J. H. TODD & SON, 

Victoria, B.C., Owners. 

AGENTS, Stanway & Bayley, Toronto. 

Agents for Ontario 

" W. S. Goodhugh & Co., Montreal. 

" Tees & Persse, Winnipeg. 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



"CREDIT" AGAIN. 

Iu a recent issue we made some re- 
marks upon Cash v. Credit- which, from 
the extensive way in which they were 
copied, must have struck the nail very 
fairly on the head. In this editorial we 
purpose to indicate in a general manner 
the method of judging safe credits. 

In the first place the credit of accom- 
modation paper should never be given- 
It is not strictly honest) and it is also 
a piece of unwisdom. Accommodation pa- 
per is the raft by which a merchant -de- 
serts the sinking wreck of his business. It 
enables two men of little credit to finesse 
so as to obtain large credit> and when 
the denoument comes, the man who is 
most innocent is the man who has to pay 
up, for the astuter scamp, who has "been 
there before," takes care to fail first, or 
otherwise get out of paying the note. 
The sign of accommodation paper is hard 
to decipher, but when one man gives a 
note to another in a totally different 
line of business one may generally con- 
sider it to be accommodation paper. The 
small storekeeper is not always the 
offender. At times of stress the whole- 
saler has been known to borrow the notes 
of or draw drafts upon his customer in 
excess of the la.tter's liability to him — 
accommodation which the customer can- 
not readily refuse to grant one who 
trusts him. 

In Great Britain the use of accommoda- 
tion paper is contrary to law. In Canada 
it is not so, and, as the sudden stoppage 
of the custom might temporarily injure 
commerce more than the change would 
benefit it, we cannot urge the interven- 
tion of the state until the evil reaches 
greater proportions. But a step in the 
right direction might be taken by those 
who have the control of credit which 
might so reduce the prevalence of the 
practice as to make it an easy thing sub- 
sequently to abolish it entirely. 

It is dangerous to make sales *upon 
credit to distant customers, of whose ac- 
tual standing and movements it is diffi- 
cult to keep track. Cash transactions are 
far the best in this case, and were they 
always insisted upon we would hear less 
of preferred creditors in the maritime 
provinces, heayv law costs, and other 
fruitless expenses. Every merchant knows 
how difficult it is for him to recover 
from an insolvent or feeble firm in his 
own town, and many have .learned by 
bitter experience how much more im- 
probable his returns are when the debt- 
or lives elsewhere. 

"We would also call attention to cer- 
tain necessary precautions in dealing 
even with local houses. Our remarks; 
while applying particularly to banking 
and wholesale dealers, are applicable also 
to retail transactions- It is risky to trust 
a poor dealer simply because his endorser 
is reputed good. He has been known to 
pull his backer down with him, while if 
the backer endorses his notes what other 
notes may he not be on as well ? Double 
name paper does not mean a man and a 
dummy. Of course, in ordinary business 
transactions, the buyer may be good and 
the seller poor, and the note be yet all 
that can be desired. Discretion more than 
set rules must be relied upon in such 
cases. A good banker or clever business 
man can tell a shallow business as a 
sailor distinguishes shallow water by cer- 
tain indefinible surface indications. 

In making advances or sales, or in dis- 
counting paper, there are two rules to 
be observed that are not sufficiently fol- 
lowed at present. The first is to de- 
mand a statement from the debtor or 
customer at regular intervals and to keep 



track of the amount of his stock, which 
should bear a very large proportion to 
his debit balance with the trusting firm, 
or. in the case of a bauk of which he is a 
customer, be considerable in excess of his 
difccounts current. The second rule is that 
the firm desiring credit be kept insured 
against fire. In these days it is 
an indication of lack of sense, 
or of poor business ability, or at 
least of close sailing to the wind, for any 
firm to remain uninsured. If there are 
not sufficient profits in the business to 
allow the annual premiums to be laid by, 
the firm can scarcely be considered sound 
enough to be trusted, while a man who 
declines to protect himself against fire 
loss can hardly be expected to give much 
thought as to the protection of his cred- 
itors. 

Retail dealers cannot- of course, insist 
upor these points, but they can pretty 
accurately judge the soundness of their 
customer by finding out his tangible as- 
sets and whether they are safeguarded 
by insurance. —Canadian Trade Review. 



frown of hate. For I have lived among 
these fierce impetuous sons of the Southern 
land, and have learned to appreciate the love 
that never falters, the friendship that never 
wants and the hatred that never sleeps. I 
have drawn in, with the heated atmosphere 
of their beloved island some of the fire that 
tingles through all their veins. I have laugh- 
ed with tbem, and have danced with them, 
have fought with their men and have made 
love to their women, have known joy and 
sorrow among them. And my orange brings 
it all back to me. I hear once more the love 
song of the dark eyed, tawny skinned peas- 
ant girl, once more I stand upon the quay at 
Palermo, and watch the natives loading the 
fruit steamers, once more I float upon the 
blue waters of the Mediterranean. — The 
Fruit Trade Journal. 



AN ORANGE. 



An orange. A bright, yellow skinned 
Palermo. That is all. Yet, that small, 
golden hued fruit has all the power of a nec- 
romancer of the "middle ages." It can, and 
does call up before my mind with vividness, 
and distinctness pictures of a crowded auc- 
tion room, of a busy pier, of a stormy ocean, 
and of a rippling sunlit sea, reflecting in its 
own blue depths the deeper blue of the un- 
clouded sky above it. It brings before me 
a vision of a sleepy Italian village, resting 
peacefully at the foot of a slumbering volcano 
It tells me of a land of passionate loves and 
passionate hatreds, of noble deeds and dark 
mines. By virtue of its power my spirit 
gazes again upon the country of the hot 
blooded generous Sicilian. Again I feel the 
hearty clasp of his hand or meet his dark 



Thursday, of last week, a deputation of the 
dry goods section of the Montreal Board of 
Trade, consisting of Mr. R. L. Gault, presi- 
dent, and Messrs. James Slessor and P. P. 
Martin, waited upon Mr. John Burton, gen- 
eral freight agent of the Grand Trunk rail- 
way, and Mr. George Olds, general traffic 
manager of the C.P.R., in reference to cart- 
age questions. Owing to the recent separa- 
tion of the cartage from the freight in the 
railway accounts, the dry goods men com- 
plain that they are compelled to pay cartage 
to their warehouses upon goods bought, 
freight prepaid, in the west, and they ask the 
railways to return to the old system under 
which the cartage and freight were included 
on the one charge, but the goods delivered 
free at their own doors. The railway repre- 
sentatives, after giving reasons for the pre- 
sent system, replied that no alteration could 
be made at present because the tariff sheets 
and schedules have already been printed. 




ON GUARD. 
Jones stays at home to watch the meter. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 




4 j3l/ILD "CO-PA V -fHFf^l, 



PO YOU 

J ^ adi/erlcseme 



o^ D ' 

adi/eVttserneti i~ 
in. the 'b 



gsSSm l •»" in tec e » 

fJECORQ, 
Tor\otsI-ro 

TIl!»"" ""^ bring you* 
I^V* tertd.ersfr<?m the 

r J?p. Sr4 c^^rc* contractors . 



E. LAZENBY & SON 

LONDON, ENGLAND. 

EVERY ARTICLE prepared by us is ENTIRELY UNADULTERATED and our 
labels are affixed to the CHOICEST DESCRIPTION OF GOODS only. 

Our goods can be obtained from leading- houses everywhere. 



SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF 

LAZENBY'S HARVEY SAUCE. 



A. P. TIPPET & CO., Agents for Canada: Toronto and St. John. 




IT IS A GREAT SUCCESS. 

Grocers from all parts of the country report that it is a quick seller 
from the start. Order a case from your jobber at once. Every cus- 
tomer you sell a bottle to will thank you after using it. Delicious 
Clam Broth can be made from it in one minute, with Hot water. 
Three sizes, retails at 25c, 50c, and 90c, in bottles only. Order from 

James Turner & Co., Hamilton, Ont., or write E. S. Burn- 
ham Company, "Manufacturers," 120 Gansevort St., New York, U.S.A. 

R. H. HOWARD & CO., Toronto. ROBT. MOORE, Travelling Agent, London, Ont. 

BATTY & CO'S PICKLES AND SAUCES 

Are the Finest Quality and Guaranteed Pure. 

A full line of these celebrated Goods are now kept 
in stock by 

Caverhill, Rose, Hughes & Co., 

Montreal. 
Sloan & Crowther, 

Toronto. 
James Turner & Co., 

Hamilton. 

1 2 3 and 125 FINSBURY PAVEMENT, LONDON. WRIGHT & COPP, Dominion Agents, TORONTO. 





S.R.YanDam&Co 



37 Old Corn Exchange, Manchester, 

and 



23 Mathew Street, Liverpool, England. 
Solicit Consignments of 

Bacon, Butter, Lard, Eggs, Cheese, 
and Canned Goods. 

LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE. FIRM FOUNDED 1850. 

" REFERENCES "-Bank of British North America, Toronto ; and Manchester and Salford Bank, 

Manchester, Eng. 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRADE IN THE MARITIME 
PROVINCES. 

But 200 new vessels, of 30,000 tons, were 
added to the registry in the Maritime Pro- 
vince during the past year, leaving a net de- 
crease cf 40,000 tons. Of this 33,600 was in 
Nova Scotia and 11,800 in New Brunswick 
and Prince Edward Island. Notwithstand- 
ing the almost total failure of the inshore 
fisheries, the exports of fish from Halifax to 
the West Indies increased from 247,500 
quintals of cod and 32,200 barrels of pickled 
fish in 1 891, to 262,000 quintals of cod and 
45,800 barrels of pickled fish last year. The 
principal markets for these fish were Ja- 
maica, Porto Rico, Cuba and Demerara. 
There was a decrease in the imports of mo- 
lasses of 9,000 puncheons and a decrease of 
1,500 hogsheads of sugar, but an increase of 
50,000 bags of sugar. As a result of the 
abolition of the sugar duties the collection of 
customs revenue decreased $233,000. — Brad- 
street's. 



LIGHTBOUND, RALSTON & 
DINE THEIR STAFF. 



CO. 



There was the usual pleasant annual 
gathering of the employes ot Lightbound, 
Ralston & Co., wholesale grocers, in Mont- 
treal last week at the residence of Mr. 
Lightbound, senior partner of the firm, on 
Peel street. It is Mr. Lightbound's regular 
custom at the holiday season to dine the 
staff of the firm, and the present was the 
eighteenth annual gathering, and quite as 
enjoyable as any of its predecessors. By the 
kind courtesy of Mr. Lightbound the repre- 
sentative of The Grocer participated, and 
is able to tell the trade of the good feeling 
that exists between Lightbound, Ralston & 
Co. and their staff. The guests were re- 
ceived by Mr. and Mrs. Lightbound, and 
after full justice had been done to the ex- 
cellent menu, and their kind hostess had re- 
tired, the feast of reason and the flow of the 
soul proceeded. 

The genial host in a short preliminary 
address expressed the pleasure it gave him 
to have his assistants once more gathered 
around him. For some it was the first time, 
others could count back almost to the first 
dinner given eighteen years ago by the firm, 
but old or new in the service ot the house, 
all were welcome. These annual gatherings 
helped greatly towards the harmonious 
working of the staff, and from his experi- 
ence of its results it made him wonder that 
the idea was still left to him alone, as to his 
knowledge no otherfirm of grocers had made 
any attempt in this direction. Proceeding, 
Mr. Lightbound thanked his staff for their 
good work during the past year. In many 
ways it had been a difficult one, and much 



work had had to be done, all, though, had 
borne their share, and through their com- 
bined efforts had carried on probably the 
largest business handled by a staff of their 
numbers in the Dominion. Some idea of 
the work to be done will be gathered from 
the fact that in the last three months' goods 
to the amount of $600,000 had been invoiced 
by the house, closing with this almost un- 
paralleled amount a most successful year. 
Once more he thanked them for their good 
work, and extended to one and all a most 
hearty welcome, and wished to all a happy 
and prosperous new year. 

During the latter part of Mr. Lightbound's 
address busy hands had uncovered a beau- 
tiful " Grandfather's clock," and when he 
sat down Mr. Tidmarsh, the firm's "Napo- 
leon of finance," arose, and in a few fitting 
words presented the clock to Mr. Light- 
bound as a slight token of the affection and 
esteem of his employes. 

A few fitting words of thanks from the 
'* chief," and the regular toasts were proceed- 
ed with. 

" Our Travellers " was responded to by 
Messrs. Hutchison and Rutherford. 

"Our Office Staff" was ably answered by 
Messrs. Tidmarsh and Aird. 

Mr. Thompson gave a well studied and 
interesting sketch of the general state of the 
country in the western part of Canada, and 
Mr. Ballantyne of that in the most import- 
ant part of eastern Canada, the Eastern 
Townships. 

Mr. Huxley arose to answer the toast of 
the "Tamilkande Tea." While thanking 
the company for the hearty manner in which 
they had drunk the toast, he regretted that 
it had not been drunk with Tamilkande tea. 
After only eight months' work, this tea was 
already for sale in two hnndred and sixty 
towns and villages in Canada, and though 
many encouraging letters and unsolicited 
testimonials had been received, they were 
yet to receive a complaint as to its quality. 
He regretted that through the absence ot 
Mr. Pegg "Tamilkande" lost an eloquent 
and poetical champion, yet as that gentle- 
man had gone to England to get married 
and would shortly return, he could not real- 
ly complain about his being absent. 

Mr. Lightbound, in proposing " Our 



Sugar Interests," paid a high tribute to our 
refiners. He said that Canada to-day was 
supplied by its refiners with sugar which for 
its purity and general qualities was not ex- 
celled by any other country. 

Mr. Thompson, of the Canada Sugar Co., 
answered to the toast in fitting terms. 

The Grocer representative was then 
called upon to answer for " The Press " and 
The Grocer, after which the ladies were 
duly honored, and then the party adjourned 
to the drawing room, where the genial host 
proceeded to distribute some very accept- 
able gifts from an attractive Christmas tree. 
Every one had been thought of, and all 
went home carrying with them some hand- 
some book or seasonable token of a really 
pleasant gathering. For Mr. Aird, of their 
office staff, the firm had a more substantial 
acknowledgement for his hard work and 
good services in the shape of a handsome 
cheque. 

The following were present ; Mr. and 
Mrs. Lightbound, Mr. Huxley, Mr. and Mrs. 
C. A. Thomson, Mr. J. Hutchison, Toronto, 
Mr. Jas. Rutherford, Mr. J. H. Stewart, Mr. 
A. W. Osgood, Mr. A. Aird, Mr. A. Tid- 
marsh, Mr. J. McGregor, Alex. Ross, Mr. 
Ballantyne, Mr. Rutherford, H. Jenner — 
Fust, John Norton, Master Robertson, Mr. 
R. B. Hall, Mr. Thomson, (Can. Sugar Co,) 
Mr. Orme, (Dominion Grocer.), Mr. E. Des- 
barats, (Can Grocer). 



Mr. R. J. Kirkland, manager of the British 
Columbia Canning Co., on River's Inlet, re- 
turned from the north on Wednesday. 
Speaking about fishing in northern waters, 
Mr. Rirkland remarked that he was sur- 
prised to find that the shad placed in the ■ 
Sacramento River years ago had worked 
their way north to River's Inlet, and even 
further up the coast. During the salmon 
season three fine shad were caught in the 
sockeye nets. The fish weighed between 
two and two and a half pounds each, and 
were filled with spawn. He says that shad 
propagate wonderfully fast, as it is only four 
years since the first were taken in the Straits 
of San Juan de Fuca, and last year the first 
was netted in the Fraser near its mouth. 
Mr. Kirkland is confident that in a few years 
shad fishing will be one of the most import- 
ant branches of the fishing industry. — Van- 
couver News-Advertiser. 



MAY TEAS. 

We have still a fairly large stock of 

FIRST GROP JAPANS 

And would advise our friends to buy NOW as the visible supply of these Teas 

is nearly exhausted. 

REGAN, WHITE Sc CO., 

1, 3 and 5 St. Helen St., MONTREAL. 



It Pays to 

keep a 
Stock of 



PERRIN'S COUGH DROPS 



Write for quotations to 
D. S. PERR1N & CO., 
LONDON, CANADA; 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 



The neglect to look after minute details in the 
factory is a source of great loss to many pro- 
ducers. 

Competition is keen and aotive and the only 
way to meet it successfully is to buy (rem the 
best, houses, and at lowest prices. 

You can lose more than we do 
by not subscribing for this paper. 



SITUATION WANTED. 
MARATIME PROVINCES. 



WANTED— A SITUATION AS TRA- 
veller for Provisions or Groceries, 
also side lines. Apply care 
15-93 B., this office. 



THE FINE8T 

IN THE LAND. 




EVERY CHOCOLATE IS STAMPED 

Gh. IB. 



GANONG BROS., Ltd. 

ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



CHA5. SOUTHWELL * CO., lok &d. 

ENGLISH JAMS, JELLIES, PRESERVES, AND MARMALADES. 

specialty in CLEAR JELLY ndRndL/lDE5 



» Scotch Home Made," 
•« Perfection." 

" Lemon Jelly Marmalade," 
" Lime Fruit Ha r ma lade," 



Made from 
Seville Oranges, 
riessina Lemons, 
West India Limes. 



PUT UP IN QLASS JARS SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR EXPORT. 

Cbas. Southwell & Co. are also manufacturers of Candied Peels, Excelsior 

Packet Concentrated Jellies, etc., etc. All goods having 

their brand are exceptionally choice quality. 

FULL PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. " WORKS: DOCK HEAD, LOKDOK, ENCLAKD. 




Crosse & 
Blackwell 



CELEBRATED FOR 




life 



#> 



Jams. 

Piokles, 
Sauces, 
dotted Meats, 

Table Delicacies, 



SOLD BY- 



All Grocers in Canada 






Msnte* 



PREPARED CORNi 






^BRANTFOR^CANAD^ 



RETAIL GROCERS 

WILL FIND IT 

To their Interest 

TO BUY 




The Purest and Best 
in the Market. 

BRITISH AMERICA 
STARCH CO., 

LIMITED, 

Brantford, Ontario. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




SALES MADE OR PENDING. 

Sinclair & Co., grocers, etc., Orillia, Ont., 
adveitise their business for sale. 

George Devlin, general merchant, Perth, 
Ont., has sold out to G. A. Bateman. 

The grocery stock of D. Martineau, 
Montreal, is advertised for sale by auction. 

John M. Dunbar, general merchant, 
Hopewell, N.S., advertises his business for 
sale. 

B. Bombough, grocer and fish dealer, Vic- 
toria, B. C, is giving up the grocery busi- 
ness. 

The generalstore stockof Alfred Limoges, 
St. Eustache, Que., is advertised for sale by 
tender. 

Hesson & Irving, grocers and provision 
dealers, Vancouver, B. C, have sold out to 
A. Kelly. 

P. McGillivray, general merchant, Alta- 
mont, N. W. T, has sold out to John & 
Henry Sampson. 

James Currie is registered proprietor in 
the firm Bruneau, Currie & Co., flour mer- 
chants, Montreal. 

The general store stock of the late R. 
Parker, Hillsdale, Ont., is advertised to be 
sold by auction on the ioth inst. 

Dame Regina Trudel, wife of Moise 
Amiot, is registered proprietress in the firm 
M. Amiot & Co., grocers, etc., Montreal. 

Maria Angelina Caron, wife of Joseph 
Madore, is registered proprietress in the 
firm Joseph Madore & Co., grocers, Lachine, 
Que. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Gallant and Deagle, general merchants, 
Margaree, N. S., have dissolved. 

Alexandre Legure and Gustave Beau- 
champ are registered proprietors in the firm 
Legure & Beauchamp, traders, Ontario. 

W. Isaac Hubley and J. Herbert Blakev 
have formed a partnership under the style < f 
Hubley & Blakey to trade as grocers and 
provision dealers in Halifax. 
FIRES. 

Wesley Snell, grocer, Tilsonburg, Ont., is 
burnt out. 

Geo. H. Gardiner, miller, Brownsville, 
Ont, is burnt out. 

A. B. Dupuis, biscuit manufacturer, 
Quebec, is burnt out. 

The stock of S. J. Major, wholesale gro- 
cer and liquor dealer, Ottawa, was damaged 
by water. Insured. 

The stock of James Alexander, produce 
merchant, Montreal, has been partially de- 
stroyed by fire. Fully insured. 
DEATHS. 
Dominique Spinelli, vermicelli manufac- 
turer, Montreal, is dead. 



DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS,COMPROMISES. 

John D. Mackenzie, grocer, Picton, N. S., 
has assigned. 

J. A. Naud, crockery dealer, Montreal, 
has assigned. 

Enos Await, general merchant, Hemford, 
N. S, has assigned. 

Stone & Co., general merchants, Rapid 
City, Man., have assigned. 

Edouard Lesage, general merchant, St. 
Leon, Quebec, has assigned. 

J. D. Buchanan, general merchant, Lake 
Megantic, Que., has assigned. 

W. J. Christie, general merchant, Little 
Bras D'or, N.S. has assigned. 

Newberry & Wells, general merchants, 
Melita, N. W. T., have assigned. 

Hughes & O'Brien, grocers, Victoria, B. 
C, have been closed by assignee. 

Halton & Jenkins, millers, Harnetsville, 
Ont., have assigned to E. McCann. 

A. McDougall & Son, wholesale liquor 
merchants, Halifax, have suspended. 

J. G. Cote, grocer, Montreal, is offering to 
compromise at 20c. in the dollar, cash. 

A. E. Joncas, trader, Berthier, Que., is 
offering to compromise at 25c. in the dollar. 

Geo. Williams, general merchant, Mano- 
tick, Ont., has assigned to P. Larmouth, 
Ottawa. 

L. Woodcock, grocer and fruit dealer, 
Cobourg, Ont. has assigned to Geo. T. 
Brickie. 

Howard C Markell, general merchant, 
Northfield, Ont., has assigned to Oscar 
Fulton. 

L. N. St. Laurent, general merchant, Ri- 
mouski, Que., has called for a meeting of his 
creditors. 

Douglas & McNiece, dealers in crockery 
and glassware,. Montreal, have transferred 
their stock to D. Yuile in trust. 



THE TREATMENT OF CUSTOMERS. 

The whole duty of the dealer to his 
customer is Hot summed up in honest 
dealing, polite attention and prompt de- 
livery of goods. It is required of mer- 
chants that they should at least provide 
sufficient room between the store counter 
and the merchandise to allow patrons to 
move about without being crushed by 
contact witih each other, or without hav- 
ing clothing soiled by coming in contact 
with goods during the busiest hours of 
the day. Some stores have so narrow a 
space between the counters that Satur- 
day evenings are a trial to the patrons 
a few people uncomfortably crowding the 
space and preventing ano another moving 
about to examine tine articles which they 
wish to purchase. The appearance of a 
jam in a retail establishment will cause 
many women to avoid the place, even if 
the prices are below the range of neigh- 
boring stores, and the most desirable 
class of patrons is most likely to be thus 
repelled and driven to rival establiishj- 
ments. This objectionable feature of too 
many retail grocery stores, viz., want of 
sufficient room for customers, seems to 
be due to the high rentals of eligible 
Store property in many cities. In New 
York City there are few jobbing houses 



that are not greatly hampered during 
the busiest season by want of space in 
the shipping and packing departments, 
and the attempt to do business in too 
cramped quartera is, in this case, ae with 
many New York and Brooklyn retailers, 
to be attributed entirely to the high 
rents of business buildings. The result 
is, as regards the retail trade at least, 
that floor space that should be devoted 
to the accommodation of patrons, and 
which would enable the clerks to move 
about more quickly while waiting upon 
customers during rush hours, is covered 
with piles of goods, only a narrow path- 
way being left open between the door 
and counter. Such establishments are 
rightly denominated "stores," the term 
"to 'shop," as used by the fair sex, not 
strictly (applying to trading with this 
class of retail establishments— they are 
simply places for the storage of goods, 
the sale of which cannot but be conducted 
with fmore or less difficulty. 

The contrast between a store crowded 
with goods in the manner alluded to 
above and the best arranged establish- 
ments, is very unfavorable to the former. 
The most modern style of grocery store, 
with its surplus stock stowed away under 
counters, on shelves and in the basement, 
and a clear view afforded right through 
the store from tend to end, invites new 
custom, while the over -crowded store re- 
pels it. If to the advantages of a clear 
floor be added seats for waiting custom- 
ers, isuch as are to be found in some of 
the leading grocers' stores, the attrac- 
tion (for the best class of customers is 
irresistible, if other things are equal. The 
dealer who compels his female customer 
to stand while waiting a clerk's leisure, 
or while her orders are being filled, has 
hardly mastered the secret or art 
of selling goods. . An old dealer 
who retired from business a few 
years ago, said to the writer re- 
cently : "If a customer is standing a 
salesman Will (have great difficulty in 
selling 'her a new brand of goods which 
his employer is eager to push, but give 
her a comfortable seat and with a little 
tact the clerk can sell her articles which 
,she is not actually in need of." A little 
reflection will convince the reader that 
our friend has not exaggerated the ad- 
vantages of the grocer who provides a 
sufficient number of seats for his pat- 
rons. 

This feature of the retail business— the 
arrangements for the comforts of patrons 
who visit their merchant's place of busi- 
ness—is as important as the demeanor of 
the proprietor and his assistants towards 
the said patrons, or the method employ- 
ed in the delivery of goods. It is a source 
of much complaint that too many 
grocers' customers do not personally 
make their purchases, but send servants 
or children with their orders. In this 
contingency the dealer has no opportun- 
ity to make sales of new articles of merit 
the messengers not being empowered to 
make purchases on their own responsibil- 
ity. If retailers wish their lady custom- 
ers to visit their establishments they 
should make proper preparations for the 
accommodations of the desired visitors ; 
not expect them to run the gauntlet of 
greasy butter tubs, dusty flour barrels, 
and toppling pyramids of canned goods, 
or to be hustled about by strangers while 
forced to stand for perhaps many min- 
iates. Make a place worth a visit and 
purchases by proxy will become less com- 
mon. — Merchants' Review. 



Qoods conveniently located save time, monej 
and temper in showing. 

No young man can possibly have mistakenhis 
calling who finds in it wbat the world wantsdone 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



Advertisements for assistants in retail and 
wholesale bouses, under this head, free. 

SALESMAN WANTED- A GOOD GROCERY 
hand ; one who is acquainted with general 
trade ; must be sober and well recommended ; 
no other need apply. Address C. Moore, Orillia. 

WANTED-BY NOV. 1ST-ENERGETIC, Ex- 
perienced salesman for general store ; well 
up in dry goods ; not afraid of work ; state 
salary; must have Al references. Address Rox 
842, Woodstock, Ont. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Advertisements inserted under this heading 
one cent per word each insertion. 

WANTED— 1,C 00,0 '0 LBS. EVAPORATED AND 
sun dried apples, for which highest cash 
prices will be paid, delivered on cars. Special 
arrangements with large dealers. Send samples, 
stating quantity, etc., promptly to Michael Doyle 
& Co., Exporters and Jobbers. Evaporated and 
Dried Fruits, Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

SITUATION WANTED. 

WANTED SITUATION — BY YOUNG MAN, 
in the wholesale grocery and provision 
trade, as an assistant or traveller. Ten years 
experience in London England. Will take 
small wages to commence. Good references. 
G. W. G. D., Oak Lake, Man. 



COWAN'S 
OCOAS ™ 
HOCOLATES 

Are Standard, and sold by 
all grocers. 

GROCERS ! 

Samples of our new lines of Brooms are 
now in our travellers hands. 

It will pay you to handle them, and we 
particularly call your attention to our brands. 



Imperial^ 
Victoria, 



xtra Fine. 



Fine. 



Select. 



Standard, 
Leader, t^ 

We also manufacture all kinds of Special 
Brooms for Floor, Yard, Stable, Warehouse, 
and Factory use. 

CURLING BROOMS ON BAMBOO 
HANDLES OUR SPECIALTY. 

Our best grades have seperate Paper 
Cover on each Broom. 

SEND FOR NEW PRICE LIST. 

CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers, TORONTO. 



THE CANADA MEAT PACKING CO., 



MOZLSTTIRIELA.IL,., 

BEEF AND PORK PACKERS, 



Carers of the Celebrated C.M.P Brand of Smoked Meat, Sugar cured 
extra-flavored Hams and Bacon. 

Ccn'.pressed Corned Beef. Ox and Lunch Tongue. 

Pure Lard a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Condensed fllinee JVteat. 



Delicious Mince Pies 

every day in the 

year. 

Handled by retailer 
as shelf or counter 
goods. No waste. 
Gives general satis- 
faction. 



Sells at all seasons. 

Will not ferment in 
warm weather. 






WATCR.if Ton ?i CI< ' AM *llTnr 
*'"««u2. T . HE »» ,STREN 






The best and cheapest 
Mince Meat on 
Earth. Price re- 
duced to {12.00 
per gross, net. 



J. H. WETHEY, St. Catharines, Ont. 




OCEAft CHAVE. 

BEST VALUE MADE. 

Absolutely guaranteed to give and continue 
to give satisfaction. 

It Never Varies. 

SOLD ONLY IN CANS 

By the live wholesale and retail trade and manu- 
factured by 

The Hamilton Coffee and Spice Co., 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




Portable Coffee Roasters, 

FOR RETAIL GROCERY TRADE, 

—ALSO — 

STATIONARY COFFEE ROASTERS 

and Coffee and Spice machinery for whole- 
sale trade. 

Send for new Illustrated Catalogue. 

THE rlUKCERFORD (0., 

67 Pearl Street, New York. 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




ADAMS' & SONS CO., 

S> | I 1 1 and 1 3 Jarvis St., 

,fcr exterior view. TORONTO, ONT. interior view. ^ 






Saabs**"?* 

THE KING OFBUACKINGS ! >. 



F. F. DALLEY & CO. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



:e. ZBZRcrw^zisr & soisrs 

7 Carrick Street, London, England, and at 26 Rue Bergere, Paris 

BOOT PREPARATIONS 

SOLD EVERYWHERE. 




MELTONIAN 

BLACKING 

(As used In the Royal 
Household) 

Renders the Boots soft, dur- 
able and waterproof. 




haMdUw Uni«l.kMfl»» 

Patent Leather 

Madaly 

E.BROWN &S0N 

AT THti* 
MANUFACTORY 
CARRICK ST London 



MELTONIAN 
CREAM 

(white or black) 

For Renovating all 

kinds of Glace Kid 

Boots and Shoes. 




Lutetian CpeAm 



E.Brown&Son 



MtlTONIAN BlACKllJc 

M*nur*'cTORv I 

'Carrick S'LonoonWC 



ROYAL 

LUTETIAN 

CREAM 

The host for Cleaning 
and Polishing Rus- 
sian and Brown Lea- 
ther Boots, Tennis 
Shoes, etc. 



■-.sJvtiV- 



|v| DE GUI CHE ;0 
10'. op. — ..J* 



"M^itJHr 



NONPAREIL 

DE GUICHE 

Parisian Polish 

For Varnishing Dress Boots 
and Shoes is more elastic and 
easier to use than any other 



Messrs. Salomon & Phillips, 33 Spruce St., New York, sole Ag.„t. for Canada and u.s.a 



Cough Drops 

Unequalled for coughs and sore 
throat. 

Packed in elegant 5 lb. Tins or Bottles. 
Prices on application. 



Wm. Paterson & Son 

BRANTFORD. 

[HE "MOST POPULAR" BUCK LEAD. 
THE " MOST REMARKABLE " POLISH. 



PLEA.HJB ASK. FOB JLND USB ONLY 

NIXEY'S SPECIALITIES OF STERLING VALUE. 



j> I CI Ch GEEES3 

Lead 




Hundred* ol Testimonials from all parts, including 

Her Majesty's, Royal Buckingham Palace. 
HIGHEST EXHIBITION HONOTTRS. 



FOR BRIGHT. SILVERY, QUICK POLISH 
FOR STOVES* mm, it 




j 1 ' 



ALWAYS USE «A 

t& PLUMBABO" 

S TOVE PO LISH. 

Always Bright A Beautiful. 
In Large Packets Id. & 2d. each. 



I'm onlj lor Laundry Purposes, producing the beat re.ulis. 




NIXEY'S 
BLUE 



"SOHO 
SQUARE" 



THE PUREST-BEST-NO SEDIMENT. 

Ol.LT BALT TBI PIDAl QTTASTITT 

■ Biariaap. 
Zitrht l-oi. aguaref in Box for Od. 
Of all Qiocers and Oilmen ; or write to 
13. SOHO SQUARE, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



For Knives, Forks, Brass 
f*5VlC5v and Steel Work, &c &c 
~V7\ Won't Wear the Blades like 
others. . 

6d. and Is. Tins. 

w NIXEY'S 

n^grV- KNIFE POLISH. 



OF ALL STOREKEEPERS EVERYWHERE. 
Wholesale: W. O. NIXEY. London. England. 



Canadian representatives : 

Mr. W. Matthews, 7 Richmond St. 

East, Toponto. 
Mp. Charles Gyde, 33 St. Nicholas 

St., Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 



ENGLISH BISCUITS 



All Grocers should keep a supply of genuine ENGLISH BISCUITS 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 



HUNTLEY & PALflERS 



BISCUIT 

MANUFACTURERS 




TO HER MAJESTY 

THE QUEEN, ETC 



READING AND LONDON, ENGLAND, 

For which there is an ever increasing demand. 

HUNTLEY& PALMERS have obtained the highest awards given to any English House for Biscuits at all the leading Exhibitions 
since 1851, and at the Paris Exhibition in 1878 they were awarded the " Grand Prix," the only Grand Prize given to the Biscuit Trade 
and the highest distinction the Exhibition could confer. The following being the terms of the award : 

" Unrivalled House known throughout the world for its enormous production and for the excellent quality of its Manufactures. 
FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS APPLY TO 

Or to their representee, HUNTLEY & PALMERS, 

MR. EDWARD VALPY, READINC 

28 Reade Street, and 16? Fenchurch Street, 

NEW YORK. LONDON, E. C, ENGLAND. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER PRICES CURRENT. 



Toronto, Jan. 5, 1893. 

This list is corrected every Thurs- 
day. The prices are solicited for pub- 
lication, an<1 are for such qualities 
and quantities as are usually ordered 
by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt 
pay are generalij obtainable at lower 
prices. 

All quotations in this department 
are under the direct oontrol of the 
Editor, and are not paid for or doc- 
tored ty any manufacturing or Job- 
bing house unless given under their 
name ; the right being reserved to 
exclude such firms as uo not furnish 
reliable information. 

BAKING POWDER. 

ptjbe gold. per doz 
h5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

J case 19 80 

|4 lb. cans 1 doz. 

I in case 16 00 

\ty* lb. cans, 1 and 

I 2dozinoase 10 50 

B50M16 oz. cans 1. 2 and 

I 4 doz. in case.... 4 60 
Il2 oz. cans, 2 and 4 
I doz. in case — 3 70 
^^8 oz. cans 2 and 4 

xeZSvaS doz. in i-ase 2 40 

— iy**^ 6 oz. cars, 2 and 4 

doz in case * 9° 

4 oz. cans, 4 and 6 doz in case ... 1 25 
Per doz 

Dunn's No. 1, in tins 2 00 

" 2 " 75 

Cook's Gem, in 1 lb pit gs 81 75 

" " 7 oz pkgs 8a 

" " 2oz " 40 

" " 51b tins 65 

' " bulk, per lb.... 12 

Per doz 

Empire, 5 dozen 4 oz cans $0 75 

f ' 4 8 " 1 15 

2 16 " 2 00 

M 5 lb cans 9 00 

bulk, per lb 15 




COOK'S FRIEND. 

(in Paper Packages.; Per do2 

Size 1, in 2and4doz boxes .... $2 40 

" 10, in 4 doz boxes 2 10 

" 2^in6 " 80 

" 12,in6 " 7C 

•' 3,in4 " „ £5 

Pound tins, 3 oz in case 3 oc 

12 oztins,3oz in case 2 40 

5 oz tins, 4 " 1 10 

5 lb tins, Vt ' , !* °° 

Ocean Wave, M lb, 4 doz cases 75 

OCEAN «;t » : iS 
WAVE Itf:* 2 " : III 

white star. per doz 

4oz tins, 3 doz in case 75 

12 " 2 doz in case 2 00 

51b " i " 9 00 

joz glass jars, 2J doz 

in case 1 10 

10 oz glass jars, 2 doz 

in case 2 00 

Bulk, per lb 15 




pgpRicrs 

CREAM 
gAKlNg 



Dime 
4 oz 
6 " 
8 " 
2 " 
16 " 
2Jlbs 

4 " 

5 " 
JO " 



doz. in 
case 
cans, 4 
3 



M 



3 

3 
lto4 
1 to 3 
I or 1 
Jorl 
Jorl 

3 



Price 

p doz 

$1 uo 

1 50 

2 25 

3 00 

4 25 

5 75 
12 00 
18 25 
22 75 
44 00 



BISCUITS. 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFEC- 
TIONERY CO. 

Abernethy 8J 

Arrowroot *° 1] 

Butter 6 

" Slbs 020 

Cabin 7J 

Cottage ° 8 i 



Digestive 10 

Daisy Wafer 16 

Garibaldi 10 

Gingerbread 11 

Ginger Nuts 10 

Graham Wafer 09 

Lemon 10 

Milk 09 

Nic Nac - 12 

Oyster 06 

People's Mixed ...., 10J 

Pic Nic o 09 

Prairie 08J 

Rich Mixed 14 

School Cake 11 

Soda 06 

" 3 lb 20 

Sultana 11 

Tea 11 

Tid Bits 09J 

Variety 11 

Village 07J 

Wine 08J 

BliACKlNG. 
Day & Martin's, pints. perdoz $3 20 
H " 2 10 

" H " l io 

Spanish, No.3 4 50 

'« " 5.... 8 00 

" " 10 9 00 

Japanese, No. 3 4 50 

" 5 7 50 

Jaquot's French No. 2 3 00 

" " 3 4 50 

" " " 4 8 00 

•' " " 5 10 00 

" 1-eross Cabinets, asst, 7 50 

Egyptian, No. 1 9 CO 

* " " 2 ; 4 50 

P. G. FRENCH DRESSING (LADIES.) 

For ladies' and children's boots and 
shoes. 

per doz 

No. 7, 1 or J doz. in box %i 00 

No. 4, " " 1 25 

P. G. FRENCH RLACEING. 

per gross 

MNo. 4 $1 00 

!4No. 6 4 50 

\ No.8 7 25 

M No. 10 25 



BI,ACK .LEAD. 

NIXEY'S 'g fl 

Refined in Id., 2d , 4d. and h! u 

Is. packages, (91b. boxes) 7s 6d $2 25 
Jubilee in loz. and 2 oz. 

round blocks in cartons 

(9 lb. boxes') 4s 3d 2 00 

Silver Moonlight, Plum- 
bago Stove Polish (13J 

lb. boxes) 

6J lb. in large id. pkts, 1 

gross 4s 3d 1 50 

13 lb. in large Jd. pkts, 2 

gross 8s 6d 3 00 

13 lb. in large Id. pkts, 1 

gross 7s 6d 2 50 

13 lb. in large 2d. pkts, J 

gross 7s 6d 2 50 

Recjutt's Black Lead, per box. 115 

Each box contains either l gro., 1 
oz.: J gro , 2 oz , or J gro., 4 oz. 

F.F. DALLEY & CO. 

Per gross 

Silver Star Stove Paste 9 00 

Packed in fancy wood boxes, each 
box contains 3 doz. 
BLUE. 
Reckitt'sPure Blno, per gross 3 1C 

NIXEY'S 

Soho Square in alb. boxes, of 
16xtfd boxes. London 6s Od 

Soho Square in 8 lb. boxes, of 
16x6d. boxes, Canada $2 25 

CORN BROOMS. 

CHAS. BOECKH & sons, per doz 

X Carpet, 4 strings, net $3 60 

2 " 4 " " 3 20 

3 " 3 2 

XXX Hurl 4 " ' 2 90 

IX " 4 " " 2 65 

2X Parlor 4 " " 2 50 

3 " 3 " 2 25 

4 " 3 " " 1 85 

5 " 2 " " 1 50 

Warchouse4 " " 3 25 

Ship 4 " ". 4 00 

1 Cable 2 wire bands, net 3 25 

2 " 3 " " ... 4 00 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




B FOR COOKING 




ST. LAWRENCE 



CORN STARCH. 




Price* Current Continued— 

CANNED GOODS. 

Per doz 

Arples, S's SO 85 $1 00 

gallons 1 75 2 00 

Blackbe,nes.2 2 00 2 25 

Blueberries, 2 100 110 

Beans, 2 90 100 

Corn, 2's 85 1 00 

" Special Brands 130 160 

Cherries, red pitted, 2's 2 10 

Peas, 2's 85 1 00 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 175 

Sugar, 2's 1 50 

Pineapple 2's 2 75 

Peaches, 2's 2 00 2 25 

" S's 3 00 3 25 

" Pie,3's 

Plums. Gr Gages, 2s 1 75 2 00 

Lombard 1 75 1 65 

" Damson Blue 150 190 

Pumpkins, S's 85 1 00 

'< gallons 3 00 3 25 

Raspberries, 2's 2 00 2 40 

Strawberries, choice 2's . 2 00 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 165 

Tomatoes,3's 85 1 00 

"Thistle" Finnan haddies 1 50 

Lobster. CloverLeaf 2 40 2 50 

" Crown flat 2 40 2 50 

" " tall 1 90 2 00 

Other brands 1 80 2 10 

Mackerel 100 110 

Salmon, tails 145 160 

" flats 1 70 

Sardines Albert, K'a tins 12V4 

K's " 20 

Martiny, %'a " . 10 10H 
" H'a " . 16 17 

" Other brands, 95£ 11 16 17 

" P&C, H'stins 23 25 

" " K's " 33 36 

Sardines Amer, H's " 6 i 8 

'« " K's " 9 11 



CANNED MEATS. 

(CANADIAN) 

Comp. Corn Beef llbcansjl 60 

.. " 2 " 2 65 

> 4 " 4 80 

•i •' 6 " 8 00 

• • " 14 " 17 50 

Minced Co Hops, 2lbcans 

Roast Beef 1 " 

" 2 " 2 60 

" 4 ' 

Par Ox Tongue, 2% " 88 00 

Ox Tcugue 2 " 7 85 

Lur ch Tongue.. 1 " .... 

" .. 2 " 6 00 

English Brawn. 2 " 2 75 
Camb. Sausage. 1 " 
" >' .8 " 

Soups, assorted. 1 " — 

Soups 4 Boulli..2 " 
> " .6 " 

Potted Chicken, Turkey, or 

Game, 6 oz cans 

Potted Ham, Tongue or Best, 6 

oz cans 



41 75 


2 80 


5 00 


8 25 


18 50 


2 60 


1 50 


2 75 


4 75 


8 25 


8 00 


3 25 


6 25 


2 80 


2 50 


4 00 


1 35 


a 25 


1 80 


4 50 


1 60 


1 35 



Devilled Tongue or Ham, V x lb 

cans 1 40 

Devilled Chicken or Turkey, 

H lb enns 2 25 

Sandwich Ham or Tongue, H 

lb cans 1 50 

Htm, Chicken and Tongue, } 

lb cans 1 75 



CHEWING GUM. 

ADAMS & SONS CO. 

To Retailers 

Tutti Frutti,36 5c bars *1 20 

Pepsin TuttiFrutti, 235o. packets 75 

Orange Blossom 150 pieces 1 00 

(each box contains a bottle of high 
class perfume. Guaranteed first 
class) 
MonteCristo- 180pieces... ISO 

(with brilliant Btone ring) 
Sappota, 150 pieces ... 1 00 

Sweet Fern, 230 " ... 75 

Red Rose, 115 pieces ... 75 

Magic Trick, 115 " ... 75 

Oolah 115 " ... 75 

Puzzle Gum 115 pieces .... 75 

Bo-Kay 150 " ... l-OO 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c. bars 1 20 

Flirtation Gum (115 pieces) 65 

Automatic ) 

Tutti Frutti Girl.... j-800 pieces. 6 00 
Sign Box (new) ) 

C. B. SOMEKV1LLE. 

Mexican Fruit, 36— 5c. Bars .. 120 

Pepsin (Dyspepsia), 20— 5c. Bars 70 

Sweet Sugar Cane, 150 pieces 1 00 

Celery, 100 " 70 

Lalla Rookh (all flavors) 100 " 70 

Jingle Bell, 150 " 1 00 

Cracker, 144 " 1 00 

O-Dont-O, 144 ' 1 00 

Little Jap, 100 " 70 

Dude Prize; 144 " 1 00 
Clock Gum comprising, 500 pieces 
Gum (assorted flavors), and I 
'Little Lord Fauntleyroy" clock 

guaranteed.) 3 75 

La Rosa (20-10c. pieces) 1 40 

Baby (100-lc. pieces) 65 

Alphabet (100-lc. pieces) 65 

Keno Prize (144-lc. pieces) 1 00 

Love Talk (100-lc. pieces) 70 

CHOCOLATES <fe COCOAS. 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO.S 

Chocolate— Per lb 

French, &'s.... 6 and 12 lbs. 30 
Caraccas. %'s..6 and 12 lbs. 35 
Premium, J's.. 6 and 12 lbs. 30 

Sante, Ji's, 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond, %,'a, 6 and 12 lbs. 22 
Sticks, gross boxes, each.. 00 
Cocoa, Homoepat'c,H's, 8 & 14 lbs 30 
" Pearl " " " 25 
" London Pearl 12 & 18 " 22 
" Rock " " 30 
" Bulk.inbxs 18 

BPP'd. 

Coeoa— per lb 

Case of 112 lbs each 35 

Smaller quantities 37J 



BENSDOBP'S ROYAL DUTCH COCOA. 

M lb. cans, per doz $2 40 

W 4 50 

1 8 6C 

PRY'S 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents) 

Chocolate— per lb 

Carracas, J's, 61b. boxes 40 

Vanilla, j's, " 40 

"Gold Medal" Sweet, 6 1b bxs. 30 

Pure, unsweetened, J's, 6 Id bxs. 40 

' Fry's " Diamond J's, 6 lb bxs. 26 

"Fry's " Monogram, J, 6 lb bxs. 26 

Cocoa— per doz 

Concentrated, J's, 1 doz in box... 2 40 

J's, " ..4 50 

1 lbs. " ... 8 75 

Homeopathic, J's, 14 1b boxes 34 

" Jibs, 12 1b boxes... 34 



JOHN P. MOTT & OO.'S 

R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott's Broma per lb $0 SO 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott' s Homceopat'c Cocoa (Js) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa 35 

Mott's Breakf. Cocoa(in tins) 40 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate.. 28 

Mott's Caracas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate... 22 
Mott's French-Can Chocolate 20 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Choc 26 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 30 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 5 

Mott's Vanilla Chocolate stick 22&24 

Mott's Confec Chocolate 22c- 40 

Mott's Sweet Choc. Liquors 21c— 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Cocoas — 

Hygienic, 1, J, J lb. boxes 70 76 

Iceland Moss %lbin 121b bxes... 35 
Soluble (bulk) 15 & 30 lb bxs .... 18 20 

Soluble (tins) 6 lb and 12 lb.... 20 

Cocoa Nibs, any quantity 30 35 

Cocoa Shells, any quantity 05 

Cocoa Essence — per doz 140 

Chocolates- 
Mexican, >i,Viinl0 Il> bxs 30 
Queen s Dessert, " 40 
Vanilla " 35 
Sweet Caracas . " 32 
Chocolate Powder, 15, 30 lb bxs 25 
Chocolate Sticks, per gross.. 00 
Pure Caracas (plain) fc, V4 lbs 40 
Royal Navy (sweet) " 30 
Confectioners' in 10 lb cakes SO 
Chocolate Creams, in 3 lb bxs 30 
Chocolate Parisien, in 6 lb bxs 30 

WALTER, BAKER & CO'S 

Chocolate — 
Pre'um No. 1, bxsl2 & 25 lbs each 45 
Baker's Vanilla in bxs 12 lbs each 55 
Caraccas Sweet bxs 6 lbs each, 12 

oxs in case 40 

Best Sweet in bxs, 6 lbs. each, 12 

boxes in case 30 

Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 bxs 

in case, per box 4 00 



German Sweet Chocolate- 
Grocers' Style, in cases 12 boxes, 

12 lbs each 30 

Grocers' Style, in cases 24 boxes, 6 

lbs each SO 

48 Fingers to the 1 b.,in cases 12 bxs 

12 lbs each 30 

48 Fingers to the lb., in cases 24 bxs 

6 lbsear.h SO 

8 Cakes to the lb., in cases, 21 bxs 

61bs. each 32 

Soluble Chocolate- 
In canisters, I lb., 41b., and 10 lb. 56 

Cocoa- 
Pure Prepared, bxes, 12 lbs each 42 
Cracked, in bis. 12 lbs., each, J lb. 

papers 35 

Cracked, in bags, 6, 10 and 25 lbs. 

each SO 

Breakfast Cocoa — 
Id bxs 3&12 lbs., each, Jib., *,ins 48 
In boxes, 12 lbs., each, lib tins, 

decorated canisters 50 

Cocoa Shells, 12's and 25's 10 

Broma— 
In boxes. 12 lbs., each, J lb. tins... 45 



■p£m 

tu.aporaied &rea™ 



|" Highland Brand 

Evaporated 

Cream, per 

case 7 25 

[4 doz. 1 lb tin r . 



CLOTHES PINS. 

5 gross, per box 75 

4 gross, " 85 

6 gross, " 1 20 

OHA8. BCECKH & SONS, per box 

5 gross, single &10box lots 75 80 

Star, 4 doz. in package 85 

" 6 " " 1 25 

" 4 ' cotton bags 90 

COFFEE. 

green c per 1 b 

Mocha 28, S3 

Old Government Java 25, 35 

Rio 20 22 

Plantation Ceylon 29,31 

Porto Rico 24, 28 

Guatemala 24, 26 

Jamaica 22, 23 

Maracaibo 24,26 

TODHUNTEB, MITCHELL & CO.' 8 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey ■' SO 

Laguayra " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 30 

Santos 27 28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



Jfl]VI 



We have an immense stock of pure 
Jams and Jellies, put up in Glass Jars 
and 5 lb. and 1 lb. Tins, and in 1 4 lb. and 
28 lb. pails. These goods are as fine 



and pure as the best imported. A trial will convince, 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFECTIONERY CO., 



Tel. 528. 



7 Front St. East, Toronto. 



Pricei onr'ent, continued — 

J. W. COWAN & CO. 

Standard Java in sealed tins, 

85 and 50 lbs 30 

Standard Imperial in sealed 

tins, 25 and 50 lbs 32 

Standard Blend in sealed tins, 

25 and 50 lbs S3 

Ground, in tins, 5, 10, 15 and 

25 lbs 20 39 

Say's Parisien, in K and lb tins SO 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum lb $0 02 $0 08 

Blue Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstone 03 03) 

Borax la 14 

Camphor 65 75 

Carbolic Acid 30 50 

Castor Oil 07J 08 

Cream Tartar 28 30 

Epsom 8f>-lts 01 J 02 

Paris Green 16 17 

Extract Logwood, bulk IS 14 

" " boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 18 

Glycerine, per lb 17 20 

Hellebore 16 17 

Iodine 6 50 6 00 

Insect Powder 30 35 

Salpetre 08$ 09 

Soda Bicarb, per keg 2 50 2 75 

Sal Soda 100 125 

Madder 121 .... 



DURABLE PAILS AND TUBS 

WM. CANE & SON'S, MANUFACTURING CO 
NEWMARKET. 

Per doz. 
Steel hoops,painted and erain'd 2 20 
Brass hoops, oiled and varnish. S 25 

No 1 tubs 9 60 

No2 " 8 50 

No 3 " 7 50 



Currants, Patraa, bbls 

" " i bbls 

" " oases 

" Vostizzas, cases... 

" " 1 cases 

" 5-crown Excelsior 

(cases) 

" lease 

Dates, Persian, boxes, 

Figs, Elemes, 14oz., per box 

" 10 1b boxes 

" 30 lb bxa. 7 crown 

Prunes, Bosnia, casks 

" " cases, new. 

Raisins, Valencia, off stalk 

old 

Selected 

Layers 

Raisins, Sultanas 

" Eleme 

' Malaga : 

London layers 

Loose muscatels 

Imperial cabinets 

Connoisseur clusters ... 4 

Extra dessert ■■ 5 

" " ' qrs. . 

Royal clusters 

Fancy Veea boxes .. 

Black baskets 

•' •' qrs 

Blue " 

Find Dehesas 

" " qrs 

Lemons 5 

Oranges, Jamaica 

" Valencias 

" Mesninas . 

" Seedlings 

" Navels 



... 5* 

... 6 

7 71 

7} 9 

8% 10 



8J 8} 

5 6$ 

11 Hi 

11 12 

15 16 

44 5i 

81 9\ 



7 71 
7J 8J 
7J 8 



2 25 2 50 



00 4 50 
00 5 25 



8 60 3 80 



00 6 00 
.. 8 00 



DOMESTIC 

Apples, Dried, per lb — 
do Evaporated 



041 05 
07$ 08 



FISH. 



EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold, No. 8, p. doz . $0 75 

1,1$ oz... 1 25 

" » 2,2 oz 1 75 

" " " S, Soz.... 2 00 

(BEELY'S FLAVORING) per doz 

Concentrated, 2 oz. full measure 175 

" 4oz. " " 3 00 

In Lemon, Vanilla and Assorted 

Flavors. Less 10 per cent, discount 

in gross quantities or more. 

FLUID BEEF. 



Oysters, per gallon 125 

" select, per gallon 

Pickerel per lb .... 06 

Pike do .... 07 

White fish do .... 07 

Manitoba White fish do 

Salmon Trout do 07 

Lake herring p. 100 1 60 2 50 

Pickled and Salt Fish : 

Labrador herring, p.bbl 6 00 6 25 

Shore herring " 5 00 

Salmon trout, per J bbl 5 00 5 50 

White Fish, 1 bbl 5 50 5 75 



JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL 

per doz 
Cases, No.1,2 oztins .... 

" No. 2, 4 oz tins 

" No. 3, 8 oz tins 

" No. 4,1 lb tins.... 
No. 5, 2 lb tins 



Dried Fish : 

Codfish, per quintal 

" cases 

Boneless fish per lb 

Boneless cod " 

Smoked Fish : 
Finnan Haddies. per lb 

Bloaters per box 

Digby herring " 

$2 75 $3 00 sea Fish : Haddockper lb 

4 50 5 00 cod " 

8 00 8 75 B.C. salmon " 

12 60 14 25 Market Cod " 

25 00 27 0b Frozen Sea Herrings 



5 25 5 75 

5 00 5 50 

04$ 

.... 08 



071 °81 

1 00 2 25 
20 



05 
074 
15 



FRUITS. 

FOREIGN. 

c. per lb 
Currants, Provincial, bbls. ... 5} 
1 bbls ... 6 
" Filiatras. bbli 



GRAIN. 

Wheat.Fall,No2 66 

" Red Winter, No 2 65 

Wheat, Spring, No 2 64 

" Man Hard 



ibbls 



5j 

84 



Nol.. 
No 2.. 
No. 3... 



67 
66 
65 
92 

o a<> 

77 77$ 



91 
84 



Oats, No 2, per 34 lbs ... 31 32 

Barley, No 1 per 48 lbs.. 49 50 

" No 2 extra 43 46 

" No 3 " 38 39 

Rye 59 60 

Peas 58 60 

Corn 56 57 



HAY & STRAW. 

Hay, Pressed, "on track 9 00 

Straw Pressed," .... 6 CO 6 50 



HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 

Cot Nails, from Toronto 

50 to 60 dv basis 2 30 

40 dy 2 35 

30 dy 2 40 

20, 16andl2d> 2 45 

lOdy 2 50 

8and9dy 2 55 

6 and 7 dy 2 70 

5dy ". 2 90 

4dy A P 2 90 

3dy AP 3 30 

4dyCP 2 80 

SdyCP 3W 

Horse Nails: 

"C" 60 and 5 per oent. from list. 
Horse Shoes : 

From Toronto, per keg 3 65 

Screws: Wood- 
Flat head iron 771 p.o. dis 
Round " " 721 p.c. dis. 
Flat head brass 75 p.c. dis 
Round head brass 70 p c. 

Window Glass : [To find out what 
break any required size of paneoomes 
under, add its length and breadth to- 
gether. Thus in a 7x9 pane the 
length and breadth come to 16 
inches; which shows it to be a first- 
break glass, i.e., not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in and under) 135 

2nd " (26 to 40 inches) 155 

3rd " (41 to 50 " ) 3 40 

4th " (51 to 60 " ) 3 70 

5th " (61 to 70 " 4 00 

Rope : Manilla 11} 

Sisal 09} 

New Zealand 08} 

Axes : Per box, $6 to $12. 

Shot : Canadian, dis. 121 P er oent. 

Hinges: Heavy T and strap ...04} 05 
" Screw, hook & strap. 03} 041 

White Lead: Pure Ass'n guarantee 
ground in oil. 

251b. irons per lb 4 4V4 

No.l " ... 5 

No.2 " 4H 

No. 3 " .. 4 

Turpentine Selected packages, per 
gal : 50 

Linseed Oil per gal, raw 56$ o 57J 
Boiled, per gal 594 foj 

Glue: Common, per lb.... 10 11 

INDURATED FIBRE WARE. 

lpail,6qt $4 00 

Star Standard, 12 qt 4 50 

Milk,14qt 5 50 

Round bottomed fire pail, 14 qt. 5 50 



Tubs, No. 1 15 60 

" 2 13 26 

" S 11 00 

Nests of 3 8 40 

Keelers No. 1 10 00 

2 9 00 

S 8 00 

1 4 7 00 

Milk pans 8 25 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 3 25 

" round " 3 50 

Handy dish 8 75 

Water Closet TankB 18 00 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

DELHI CANNING CO 

Jams assorted, extra fine, l's . 2 35 
Jellies, extra fine l's 2 25 

TORONTO BISCUIT & CONFECTIONERY C O 

Per lb 
Jams, absolutely pure— apple... $0 06 

Family 07 

Black and Red currant. Rasp- 
berry, Strawberry, Peach 

and Gooseberry per lb IS 

Plum 10 

Jellies — pure — all kinds 10 

These goods are put up in 
glass jtars and in 5, and 10 
lb. tins and 28 lb. pails. 
Marmalade— orange 12 

KNIFE POLISH. 

nixey's 
" Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

6d London 5s., Canada, $2 00 

"Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

Is London 10s„ Ca nada, $1 00 

LICORICE. 

YOUNG & smylie's list. 

5 lb boxes, wood orpaper, per lb 40 
Fancy bxs. (36 or 50 sticks), per 

box 125 125 

'• Ringed" 5 lb boxes, per lb 40 

" Acme" Pellets, 51b cans, per 

can 2 00 

'Acme" Pellets, Fancy boxes 

(30s) per box 150 

" Acme" Pellets. Fanoy paper 

boxes, per box (40s) 1 25 

Tar Licorice and ToluWafers, 5 

lb cans per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb glass 

jars 1 75 

Licorice Lozenges 5 lb cans... 1 50 
Purity" Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 
100 " . 724 
Imitation Calabria, 5 lb bxs 

plb 25 

MINCE MEAT. 

J. H. WETHEY'S— 8T.CATHARINE8 

Condensed, per gross, net 312 00 

MUSTARD. 

ELLIS & KEIGHLEY'S. C ts 

Durham, Pino, inland! lb tins 

per lb 25 

Fine, in 1 lb jars 22 

Fine, in 4 lb jars 70 

Ex Sup., in bulk.per lb 30 

' Superior in bulk, p. lb 20 

Fine, " " 15 

Cherry's Irish 

Pure in 1 lb. tins 40 

Pure in lib. tins 42 

Pure in { lb. tins 44 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Price* currtnt, continued. 

NUTS. per lb 

Almonds, Ivioa 13 14 

" Tarraeona 15* 16 

•' ForniRetta 13 14 

Almonds, Shelled Valencias 28 32 

Jordau. 40 45 

'• Canary ... 28 30 

BraEil 11 1*1 

Coooanuts, 5 6 

Filberts, Sicily 91 10 

Pecans 11 15 

Peanuts, roasted 10 12 

" green 9 1° 

Walnuts, G-renoble 15 16 

" Bordeaux 10 11 

" Naples, cases 

" Marbots 1*J 13 

•' Chilis 12 13 

PETROLEUM. 

to 10 bbl lots, Toronto... Imp.gai 

Canadian 14 *0 15 

Caroon Safety 17 18 

Canadian Water White 20 22 

Amer'n Prime White 23 

Water White.. 24 25 

Photogene 27 00 

(For prices at Petrolia, see Market 
Report.) 

PICKLES & SAUCES. 

THE T. A. SNIDER PBEoEBVE CO., 
CINCINNATI. 

(Wright & Copp, Toronto, Agents,) 
per doz 

Home Made Tomato Catsup, qts 6 00 
" •' pts 3 50 

" " Vt pts 2 00 

Chili Sauce pts 4 50 

" Y, pts 3 25 

Soups (in 3 lb cans). 

Tomato 3 50 

Fancy— Chicken, Mock Turtle, 
Cream of Corn Pea, Celery, 

Asparagus 4 50 

Fancy — Chicken Gumbo, Oy 
Tail, Consomme Bouillon, 
Mulligatawny, Mutton Broth, 
Beef, Pea, Printanir, Julienne 
Vermicelli, Vegetable 4 25 



lea <fe pebrin'S. per dO«" Grand Duke 6} 7J 

Worcester Sauce, \ pts.. 83 60 83 7b Sago 4* 5J 

" ■' pints 6 25 6 50 Tapioca 5 5} 

LAZENBY & SONS Per doz 

Pickles, all kinds, pints 3 25 

'< " quarts 6 00 

Harvey Sauoe-genuine— hlf. pts 3 25 

Mushroom Catsup " " 2 25 Hire's (Liquid) per doi 82 00 

Anohovy Sauce " " 3 25 

SPICES. 



ROOT BEER. 



Oswego Corn Starch— for Puddings, 
Custards, etc.— 

40-lb boxes, 1 lb packages 81 

20-lb " " 8| 

ST. LAWRENCE 8TABCH CO. '8 

Culinary Starches— 

St. Lawrence corn starch 7 

Durham corn starch 6) 



PRODUCE. 

daibt. Per b 

Butter, creamery, tubs. 80 21 80 23 

" dairy, tubs, choice 16 20 

» medium 14 16 

" low grades to com 12 13 

Butter, pound rolls .... 19 2C 

" large rolls 17 

" store orocks 17 

Cheese °ll 

COUNTRY 

Eggs, fresh, per doz 18 

■• limed 18 

Beans 1 15 1 30 

Onions, per bbl 175 2 25 

Potatoes, per bag 60 70 

Bops, 1891 crop 13 15 

" 1892 " 16 18J 

Honey, extracted 05 U 07 

" section 12 14 



PROVISIONS. 

Baoon, long clear, p lb 08J 

Pork, mess, p. bbl 16 50 

" shortcut 17 50 18 00 

Hams, smoked, per lb... 11J 12 

pickled 11 

Bellies 12 12tf 

Rolls 094 

Backs.. 11| 12 

Lard, Canadian, per lb 10J 

Compound 08 081 

Tallow, refined, per lb.. 05 05J 

" rough, " 02 



OBOUND 
Pepper .black, pure 80 

" fine to superior — 

" white, pure 

" fine to choice 

Ginger, Jamaica, pure 

" African, " 

Cassia, fine to pure 

Cloves, " " 

Allspice, choice to pure — 

Cayenne, " 

Nutmegs, " " — 

Mace, " " 1 

Mixed Spice, choice to pure. 
Cream of Tartar, fine to pure 

STARCH. 



Per lb. Laundry Starches— 



12)80 15 
10 18 
28 
25 
27 
IB 
25 
25 
15 
35 



4 4 ! 



75 1 20 

00 1 25 

30 35 

25 37 



No. 1, White, 4 lb. Cartons. 

" " Bbls 

" " Kegs 4J 

Canada Laundry 3} 

Ivory Gloss, six 6 lb.bozes, slid- 
ing covers 6J 

Ivory Gloss, fancy picture, 1 lb 
packs 6J 

Patent Starch, fancy picture, 1 
lb. cartons 6} 

Ivorine Starch is cases of 40 
packages $3 00 



SUGAR. 



c. per lb 



BRITISH AMERICA STARCH CO 
BBANTFOKD. 

1st quality white, in kegs and brig 
1st quality white, 3 lb. cartoons,. 

Lily White gloss, crates 

Brantford gloss, 1 lb 

Lily White gloss, 1 lb chromo.... 

Canada Laundry, Boxes 

Pure Prepared corn 

Challenge Corn 

Rice Starch, fancy cartoons 

" cubes 



el 

71 
6} 
41 
7i 
6§ 

?! 



Granulated 4J 

Paris Lump, bbls and 100 lb.bxs ... 

" " 50 1b. boxes 

Extra Ground, bbls 

" " less than a bbl 

Powdered, bbls 5 

" less than a bbl 

Extra bright refined 

Bright Yellow 3J 

Medium " 

Brown 



RICE, ETC. 



Per lb 



Rice, Aracan 31 4 

Patna 4} 5) 

Japan 5 6 

extra Burmah 31 4 

Java extra 6) 7 

Genuine Old Carolina .... 9J 10 



KINQSFOBDS OSWEOO STABCH. 

Pure Starch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4 lb pack'g's 8 

36-lb " 3 lb. packages 8 

12-lb " 8J 

38 to45-lb boxes 8 

Silver Gloss Starch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4 lb. pack'g's 9 

40-lb •' 1 lb. package 91 

40-lb " Jib. " 10 

40-lb " assorted 1 and 1 lbs. 9} 

6-lb " sliding covers 9J 

38 to 45 lb boxes 9 



SALT. 

Bbl salt, car lots 120 

Coarse, car lots, F.O.B 70 

small lota 85 90 

Dairy, car lots, F O.B 125 

" small lots 150 

" quarter-sacks 45 50 

Common, fine car lots 80 

" small lots 95 1 00 

Rock salt, per ton 15 00 

Liverpool coarse 75 80 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 



SYRUPS. 



Per lb. 
bbls. I bbls 

'.'.'"".■' 21 2* 
2| 31 



W. G. A. LAMBE & CO., 

GROCERY BROKERS 

TORONTO. 



Agents for 



The Si Lawrence Sugar Refining Co,, 

MONTREAL. 

SHOW CARDS 

WELL DISPLAYED HELP THE SALE OF GOODS. 

ANY STOREKEEPER CAN GET 

Johnston's Fluid Beef Cards 

BY APPLYING TO 

THE JOHNSTON FLUID BEEF CO., 

MONTREAL. 



Kingsford's Oswego 
STARCH. 



STRONCEST. PUREST. 



BEST 



"THE ORIGINAL" 



"Silver Gloss" 

(Others so-called are imita- 
tions of our brand ) 

Pure Starch. 



FOR THE TABLE. 

Kingsford's 

Corn Starch. 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING 
JOBBERS IN CANADA. 



T. KINGSFORD & SON 



OSWEGO, N.Y. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 




PURE CALABRIA "Y. & S." LICORICE, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16s to pound. 
"ACME" LICORICE PELLETS, In 5-pound Tin Cans. 

TAR, LICORICE and TOLU WAFERS, in 5-pound Tin Cans. 

LICORICE "Y. & S." LOZENGES, In 5-pound Tin Cans and 5-pound Glass Jars. 
"PURITY," PURE PENNY-LICORICE, 100 and 200 Sticks in a Box. 



Manufactured 

Exclusively by 

Where did you see this advertisement ? 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. 



Prieet current, continued — 



23 



V.B 

E.V.B 

K. Superior 

XX 

XXX -. 2| 3 

Crown 3 3J 

MOiiASBES. Per gal 

Trinidad, in puncheons.... 35 37 

bbls 38 46 

Jbbls 40 40 

New Orleans, in bbls 30 52 

Porto Rico, hdds 38 40 

barrels 42 44 

$ barrels 44 46 

SOAP. 

Ivory Bar, 1 lb. bars per lb 

Do. 2, 6-16 and 3 lb bars " 
Primrose,4$ lb bars.wax W " 

1 
John A, cake, wax W.perdoz 
Mayflower, cake, " " 

Gem, 31b bars per lb 

•' 13 oz, 1 and 2 lb. bars 

Queen's Laundry, per bar 

Pride of Kitchen, per box 

8unshine, boxes, 100 tablets 

" 50 



Buby, 10 oz 

Monster, 8 oz 

Detroit, 14 oz 

Lily White 

Everyday 

Queen City, 14 oz. 



2 

it 

42 

42 

si 

5 \ 

2 75 
6 50 

3 40 
morse's soaps. Per lb 

Mikado (wrapped) 04$ 

Eclipse n 04f 

Stanley Bar 04} 

Defiance 04i 

Toronto, 12 oz Per doz 50 

30 
24 
48 
90 
80 
72 
Per box 

Mottled in 5 box lots, 100 bars... 5 00 
" " 60 bars... 3 00 

Floater (boxes free) 6 50 

Electric 2 75 

Hard Water Electric 2 50 

Royal Laundry 3 25 

Octagon 4 00 

Per doz 

Royal Magnum 25 

" " 25 doz per box. 20 

Anchor, Assorted 40 

" Castile 50 

Morse's Assorted 45 

Morse's Roso 45 

" Windsor u 45 

• Castile 45 

Bouquet, paper and wood 80 

Prize Magnum, White Castile . 72 

Honey 72 

" Glycerine 72 

" Oatmeal 72 

Per box 
" ' Honeysuckle ... 72 

SweetBriar 85 

Extra Perfume 55 

Old Brown Windsor Squares .. 30 

White Lavender 1 00 

Per doz 

White Castile Bars 85 

White Oatmeal 85 

Persian Boquet, paper 2 50 

Oriental 45 

Pure Coooanut, 3 doz. bxs, wood 40 

Heliotrope paper 150 

Carnation 60 

Rose Boquet 60 

Cocoa Castile 40 

Arcadian 45 

New Arcadian, per gross 4 25 

Ocean fcoquet 45 

Barber's Bar, per lb 25 

Pure Bath 1 00 

Magnolia 1 20 

Oatmeal 85 



Unscented Glycerine 90 

Grey Oatmeal 60 

Plain Honey 70 

Plain Glycerine 70 

Plain Windsor 70 

Fine Bouquet 100 

Morse's Toilet Balls 90 

TurkishBath 60 

Infants' Delight 1 20 

TEAS. 

CHINA GREENS 

Gunpowder— per lb 

Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 
Young Hyson — 

Cases, sifted, extra firsts ... 42 50 

Cases, small leaf, firsts 35 40 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 

" " seconds 17 19 

" " thirds 15 17 

" common 11 14 

PINO SDEYS. 

Young Hyson — 

Half chests, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

JAPAN. 

Half Chests- 
Choicest 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 12$ 15 

Nagasaki, $ chests Pekoe... 16 22 

" " Oolong 14 15 

" " Gunpowder 16 19 

" " Sittings.... 5 9 
Congou— BLACK. 
Half Chests, Kaisow, Mon- 

ing, Pakling 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow... 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souohong 18 30 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 4o 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

British Consols, 4's ; bright twist, 

5's ; Twin Gold Bar, 8's 67o 

Ingots, rough and readv, 8's 64 

Laurel, 3's 57 

Brier, 7's 55 

Index, 7's 50 

Honeysuckie,7's 58 

Napoleon, 8's 54 

Royal Arms,12's 55 

Victoria, 12's 53 

Brunette, 12's 501 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 51$ 

" in 40 lb boxes.. .. 51 
Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T <fc 

B,3's 60 

Lily, 7's 55 

Diamond Solace, 12's 50 

Mvrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb tins 70 

J lb pg, 6 lb boxes 70 

oz pg, 5 lb boxes 70 

EMPIRE TOBACCO COMPANY. 
CUT SMOKING. 

Golden Plug, 2 oz. pkg boxes, 5 

lbs. 65 

Uncle Ned, 2 oz. pkg, bxs 5 lbs 60 

Gem, 2 oz, packages, 5 lb boxes 61 

Gem, 8 oz tins in 61b cases 70 



PLUG SMOKING, 

Golden Plug : 56 

Uncle John, 3x6, 3s. caddies 

16$ lbs 54 

Gem. 3x6, 3s. caddies 16$ lbs.... 53 
St. Lawrence, 2x3, 7s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 51 

Banner, 2x3, 7s. caddies about 

17lbs 48 

Sterlng, 2x3, 7s. caddies about 

17 lbs 46 

Louise.Solace, 12s.caddies about 

16 lbs 46 

Florence, Solace, 12s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 42 

Hawthorne, 8s. butts 23 lbs 47 

Something Good, 6s. butts 21 lbs 46$ 

PANCY SWEET CHEWING. 

Good Luck, spun roll, 16 boxes 

4 lbs 65 

Empire, 3x6, 4s. spaced 8s. bxs 

41bs 61 

Top, 16 oz. spaced 8s. boxes 4 lbs 60 

Joy, 3 x 12s., 14} oz. Spaced 6s. 

Rough and ready. But cs 25 lbs 52 
Judge, i x 3, 8s. Flat. Caddies 

about 20$ lbs 50 

Currency, 3 x 3, 7s. Rough and 

ready. Caddies about 21 lbs. 49 
Kentucky, 1$ x 3, 13s. Caddies 

about 21 lbs 50 

Kentucky, H x 3, 7s. Caddies 

about 21$ lbs 49 

BLACK SWEET CHEWING. 

Star, Narrow, 12s. Butts about 

22 lbs 47 

Morning Star, 12s. Butts about 

22$ lbs 43$ 

Montreal Twist, 12s. Caddies 

about 23 lbs 44 

Anchor Twist, 12s. Caddies about 

23 lbs 42$ 

ciGAas— s. davis <fe BON8, Montreal. 

Sizes. Per M 

Madre E' Hijo, Lord Landsdow$60 00 

" Panetelas 60 00 

" Bouquet 60 00 

" Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow 85 00 

" Reina Victoria 80 00 

" Pins 55 00 

E 1 Padre , Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Vict., Especial.. 50 00 

" Conchas de Regalia ... 50 00 

" Bouquet 55 00 

" Pins 50 00 

" Longfellow 80 00 

' ' Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo.Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas , 30 00 

Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes, all Tobacco — 

Cable 7 00 

El Padre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION OUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

CIGARETTES. Per M- 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 00 

B. C.No. 1 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 50 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

cut tobaccos. per lb 

Puritan, tenths, 5 lb. boxes 74 

Old Chum, ninths, 5 lb box 71 

Old Virgin. ,1-10 lbpkg, 10 lbbxs 62 
Gold Block, ninths, 5 lb boxes. 73 



CIGARETTE tobacco. 

B. C.N.I, 1-10,5 lb boxes 

Puritan, 1-10, 5 lb boxes 85 

Athlete, per lb 1 ]6 

Hyde Park 10 5o 

VINEGAR. 

A. HAAZ & CO 

XX, W.W 2C 

XXX, W.W 6 

Honey Dew 30 

Pickling 30 

Malting «. 

WOODENAVARE. per doz 

Pails, 2 hoop, clear Nr 1... $1 70 

" 3 » " 190 

Pails, 2hoops, clear No. 2 1 60 

" 3 " " " .. 1 80 

" 3 " painted... " ... 1 80 

Tubs, No. 9 50 

1 8 00 

1 7 00 

3 6 00 

Washboards, Globe $1 90 2 00 

" Water Witch .... 1 40 

Northern Queen 2 25 

" Planet „ 170 

Waverly 1 60 

XX 1 50 

X 1 30 

Single Crescent... 1 85 
" Double " ... 2 75 

" Jubilee 2 25 

" Globe Improved. 1 90 

" Quick and Easy . 1 80 

" World 1 75 

" Rattler 1 30 

per case. 
Matches, 5 case lots, single cases 

Parlor 1 60 $1 65 

Telephone ... 3 60 3 70 

Telegraph .... 3 80 3 90 

Safety 4 20 4 30 

French 3 60 3 75 

Railroad (10 gro. in case) 

Single case and under 5 cs. $3 70 

5 oases and under 10 oases ... 3 60 

Steamship (10 gro. in case) 

Single case and under 5 cs. 3 50 

5 cases and under 10 cases... 3 40 

per doz 

Mops and Handles, comb. 125 

Butter tubs $1 60 $3 20 

Butter Bowls, crates ast'd 3 60 



E 



WASHING 
COMPOUND. 

Housekeeper's Quick- 
Washing per case. 
5c pkgs 100 in case ... 
10c ,r 60 in case ... 



8 50 
4 00 



PEERLESS WASHING COMPOUND. 

per case 
V\ lb packages, 12 doz in case... S4 50 
V4 " 6 " ... 3 90 

1 lb " 3 " .. 3 60 

5 cts " 100 " . . 3 50 

YEAST. 

barm mpg. co. per box 

1 box containing 2 doz. 5c. pkgs. 50 
1 ^_ " 2 doz. 10c. " 1 00 



BREADMAKER'S 

per box 
5c packages 36 in box 1 00 
2c " 45 in box 5C 




40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 






t ze: :e 



ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CD'S 

GRANULATED 

AND YELLOWS 

AND 8YRUP8 

ARE PURE 

: JiO BLiUEIfiG : 

Material whatsoever is used in the manufacture of 



THE CANADA SUGAR REFINING GO'Y [limited], 

MOITTBEAL, 
Manufacturers of Refined Sugars of the well-known Brand 




Of the Highest Quality and Purity, made by the Latest Processes, and the Newest 
and Best ' Machinery, not Surpassed Anywhere. 

Lump Sugar, in 50 and 100 lb. boxes. 

"CrOWil" Granulated, Special Brand, the finest which can be made 

Extra Granulated, very Superior Quality. 

"Cream" Sugars, (not dried.) 

YellOW Sugars of all Grades and Standards. 

Syrups of all Grades in Barrels and Half Barrels. 

Sole Makers of high class Syrups in tins, 2 lb. and 8 lb. each. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Travellers' Guide, 

- The Alberta Hotel - 



CALGARY, N.W.T. 



Strictly first-class. Headquarters for Commerc i t 
Men. Large sample rooms. 

H. A. PERLEY, Prop. 

The Hiliiard House 

RAT PORTAGE, ONT. 



Strictly first-class. The favorite commercial 
house along the line of C P. B 

LOUIS HILLIARD, Prop. 

THE LELAND HOUSE, 

Portage La Prairie, Man. 



Best sample rooms west of 'Winnipeg. Strictly 
first-class. 



WM. NEVINS, Prop. 



Grand Pacific Hotel 

KAMLOOPS, B.C. 



F 



The leading hotel in the city. Sample rooms 
convenient to stores, provided for commercial 
men 

H. SMITH, Proprietor. 

The Hotel Wilson. 

NANAIMO, B. C. 

The largest and best Hotel in the city. 

JOS. RICHARDS, 

Proprietor. 

PURE CONFECTIONERY, 

FINEST BISCUITS. 

Manufactured by 

J. McLAUGHLAN & SONS, 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



rfpted J3ro4. 

' ' ' FOR EVERY 

• • • DESCRIPTION OF 



54 YONGE ST. 
TORONTO 



PRICES RIGHT' • • 
Telephone 1785 

• « ••• » • 

ORDERS BY MAIL RECEIVE PROMPT 
ATTENTION 




; '^ 1L 




BUY THE BEST. 

SEELY'S 

Celebrated 
Flavoring 
Extracts. 

VANILLA, LEMON, 

and Assorted Flavors. 
Standard Goods of Am- 
erica (established in 
1862). Once tried, al- 
ways used. 

Seel) Manufacturing Co, 

Detroit, Mich. - Windsor, Ont. 



Wholesalers 

And 

Manufacturers 

When 

Considering 

Appropriation 

For 

Advertising 

For 

1893 

Remember 

THE 

CANADIAN GROCER 



THE RIPAN8 TABULES regulate the stomach, 
liver and bowels, purify the blood, are pleas- 
ant to take, safe and always effectual. A reliable 
remedy (or Biliousness, Blotches on the Face, 



Bright's Disease, Catarrh, Colic, Constipation, 
Chronic Diarrhoea, Chronic Liver Trouble. Dia- 
betes, Disordered Stomach, Diiziness, Dysentery, 
Dyspepsia, Eczema, Flatulence, Female Com- 

Slaints, Foul Breath, Headache, Heartburn, Hives, 
aundioe, Kidney Complaints, Liver Troubles, 
Loss of Appetite, Mental Depression, Nausea, 
~ Painful Diges- 
Rushof Blood 
Sallow Com- 
Rheum, Scald 
ula,SlckBead- 
easeB.Sour 
Feeling.Torpid 
Water Brash 
er symptom 
r e suits from 
impure blood or a failure in the proper perform 
ance of their functions by the stomach, liver and 
intestines. Persons given to over-eating are ben- 
efited by taking one tabule after each meal. A 
continued use of the Ripans Tabules is the surest 
cure for obstinate constipation. They contain 
nothing that can be injurious to the most deli- 
cate. 1 gross (2, 1-2 gross tl.26, 1-4 gross 76c., 
1-24 gross 15 cents. Sent by mail postage paid. 
Address THE RIPANS CHEMICAL COMPAMT, 
P. O Box 672, New York. 




THE 



Oakville Basket Co., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




i, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets. 
1, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
I, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 
For sale by all Woodenware Dealer 



Oakville, Ont. 



DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE& SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT., 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly fall off. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE. 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



ORDER 

IVORY BAR 
SOAP 



OLD CHUM 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PLUG AND CUT 



FINNAN HADDIES 

Fresh Smoked. 



ORDERS SENT TO 

H. W. NORTHRUP & GO. 

St. John, N. B. 

WILL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTEN- 
TION, ALSO 

Dry Codfish, Smoked 

Herring, &c, &c. 



JOHN PETERS & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 
and Brokers, 

Halifax, N. S. and 
Kingston, Jamaica, W,l. 

Agents for The E. B. EDDY MFG CO., 
HULL, P. a. 



We are open to acoept one or two more Agen- 
cies of first-class houses, either at Halifax or 
Kingston. We have a good connection and 
splendid storage facilities. 

References: The Merchants Bank of Halifax. 
The E. B. Eddy Agencies. Mfg Co., Hull, P.Q. 
The Mercantile Agencies. 



1 Tea Caddies all Sizes 

SPICE, BAKING POWDER AND TOBACCO TINS, 




AND TIN SIGNS, 

LITHOGRAPHED OR JAPANNED. 

Write our nearest house for Catalogue and Prices 

THE NTCLARY M'FG COMPANY, 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 

WAY UP IN QUALITY 

§mz WAY DOWN IN PRICE 

JUST THE KIND 



ELEGANT PATTERNS. 



ALL 



S 

D 
X 
O 

o 

J 

o 

Ed 

J 
Q 

2 
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X 

u 

Q 

< 

h 
< 

CO 

a 

j 


X 

o 

z 

< 

Id 

J 

id 

X 
'i- 
J 

i 



s 




ALL 
SIZES 



FOR 



Christmas Trade 

An assortment of FANCY LAMPS which 
we are selling in job lots 

Away Below 
Regular Prices 

They are sure to please you. 



GOWANS, KENT & CO., 

Toronto and Winnipeg. 




TORONTO SALT WORKS, 

128 Adelaide E., Toronto, 

8ole City Agentsfor the "Canada Salt Association' 



Dealers in all kinds of Table, Dairy, Meat Car- 
ing, Barrel and Land Salts. 

The " Acme " Table Salt (new process) will not 
get damp or hard. 

Two Silver Medals, at Industrial Exhibition, 
Toronto, 1890, for our "Acme" Table Salt and 
our "Star Brand" Dairy Salt 

Florida Oranges, 
Almeria Grapes, 

Lemons, Cranberries, 
Nuts of all kinds, 

Figs and Dates. 

DAWSON & CO., 

32 WEST MARKET ST., 

Telephone 1471 TORONTO. 

Consignments of Produce Solicited. 

FAC SIMfLE OF PACKAGE. 






Brantford 

and 

Pelee Islaud 



J. S. HAMILTON & CO'Y, 

Bbantfobd, Ont 
Sole Agents for Canada. 



The pure INDIAN TEA of 

KEMBLE & CO., 

Calcutta, India, 

Is "Second to None" for Purity, Strength, 
and Flavor. TRY IT. 

A. DAVIDSON, C «£entative 
48 Front St. East, Toronto. 



> 

r 
r 

H 
x 
m 

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pi 
> 
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2 

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pr 

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x 
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X 

> 

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O 

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O 

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CO 

2 
O 

2 

O 

H 
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CO 

> 

o 



HYDE PARK. ATHLETE, PURITAN, DERBY. SWEET SIXTEEN CIGARETTES. 



S. DAVIS & SONS. LARGEST CIGAR MANUFACTURERS IN CANADA 



Published 

fc WEEKLY 

/00 PER YEAR 




VOL. VII. 



TORONTO, JANUARY 13,1893. 



No. 2 








COLMANS MUSTARD 



HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 



ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 



tWo-gold-jviedals 

international health exhibition london 1bs4 

Only M?dai Dublin. 1S65. W grand qold^edal^oswwlS^&S 



ASK YOUR 
WHOLESALE GROCER 



-FOR- 



RAILROAD AND STEAMSHIP 

MATCHES 



GUARANTEED 
Second to None. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 
56 AND 58 FRONT ST. W. 

TO'ROlsTTO- 




MAKE SIMPLY WITH BOILING MILK OR WATER 

FOB SAIiE BY ALL GROCERS. 



DUNNS 
BAKING 
POWDER 

THECOOK'S BEST FRIEND 

Largest Sale in Canada. 



Don tjail to handle 



THE CELEBRATED IMPORTED 

MENIERE 

IMOLAIE 



ANNUAL SALES EXCEED 33 MILLION LBS. 

TD HAVE IT ADVERTISED 
FREE & FREELY 

IN YOUR OWN name: amongst 
YOUR CUSTOMERS WRITE TO 

C.ALFRED Chouillou agent Montreal. 



" LA CADENA " and " LA FLORA " The Cream of the Havana Crop. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The McKay Milling Co., Ltd., 

OTTAWA, 

Manufacturers of High Grade Patents, Strong Bakers, 

and Family Flours. 

O-flTlVTE ALi^^Granulated. Mid Cut, Fine Cut, Flour Cut and Round Cut. 



WE MAKE THE CELEBRATED 



ROLLED OATS. 



R. £n T. WATSON, Manufacturing Gonfectioners, 



IF you wish to handle the MOST SALABLE 
CONFECTION in the market, try BALA LICO- 
RICE. We are Headquarters for Fine Choco- 
lates, Creams, Swiss Fruits and One Cent Goods, 
Icing Sugar, Cake Ornaments, etc. 

seisthd :fo:r peice list. 

75 Front Street East, 



KOFF NO MORE. 

WATSONS COUGH DROPS 

Will give positive and instant relief to 
those suffering from Colds, Hoarseness, 
Sore Throat, etc., and are invaluable to 
Orators and Vocalists. R. & T. W. 
stamped on each drop. Try them. 

TORONTO. 



The Norton Manufacturing Co. 

K P. breckenridge, C. C. Warren, 

President. Secretary. 

Edwin Norton, W. C. Breckenridge, 

Vice-Pres. Mgr. & Treas. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



ITin Cans 

By Automatic Machinery. 

Fruit, Paint, Lard, Baking Powder, Fish, 
and Seamless Lobster 

CANS. 

Capacity, fifty thousand cans per day. 
Sole Agents in Canada for Norton Brothers 

"Solder Hemmed" Caps. 

Inquiries and Correspondence Solicited. 

HAMILTON. - ONT. 



SHINE 



WITH 



YOUR BOOTS 




MANUFACTURED BY 

PURE GOLD MFG. CO. 

TORONTO. 



To Our 

Grocer Friends : 

GENTLEMEN :— 

We are in the last month of the year ; 
Christmas Holidays with their festivities 
will soon be here, and '92 will soon be 
passed. We will be pleased to have your 
orders by card for any small quantities you 
may require to stock up for Christmas 
trade, and in reference to freight or express 
in transmitting these small amounts you 
will find us liberal. Let us hear from you as 
you may want. 

And wishing you the compliments of the 
season, 

We remain, 

THE SNOW DRIFT CO., 

BRANTFORD 





We have removed 
to our new premises, 
No. 146 & 148 Car- 
ling St. Call and see 
us when in our City.. 

GORMAN, 
ECKERT 

&C0. 

LONDON. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRY A SAMPLE ORDER 

MAGLAREN'S 
IMPERIAL 

CHEESE 

IN GLASS JARS. 

LARGE, MEDIUM and SMALL. 



WRIGHT &COPP 



Dominion Agents, 

TORONTO. 



FRY'S 

Pure Concentrated 

COCOA. 



Is the strongest preparation of Cocoa 
made, and is absolutely pure, without 
flavoring matter or any other ingredi 
ents. 

It is recommended by the highest 
medical authorities for its marvellous 
purity and strength and soluability. 
It is a profitable line to handle. 



The highest grade of Pure Cocoa manufactured. 
For sale by all leading dealers. 

Toronto Office, J. S. FRY & SONS, ttyi Wellington St, E. 



An Jpreservitas h 




OR preserving Milk, Cream, 
Eggs, Meat, Poidtry, Game, 
'Etc., during the Warmest- 
Weather. 



The use of this product has enabled 
Australian Butter Makes to capture 
the English Butter Market and obtain 
higher prices than is paid for any other 
make of butter — See Editorial Notes 
Canadian Grocer, in issue of Jan. 13. 

One Agent Dealer in Each District to supply Dairymen 

Consignments of Butter, Cheese, Bacon, ^^ 

TL^U^TJ^XhT*, A S ent M. F. EAGAR, Halifax. N. S . 

IF YOU WANT A GENUINE SURPRISE 

Ask for Sample of 

JAPAN TEA— at 12 l-2c. f. o. b. Montreal or Toronto. 



IF YOU WANT A BARGAIN 

ORDER 

Porto Rico Molasses in Barrels, 32c. 

And whatever you want you can get from 




■ Ralston & Co., 



PVkolesale Grocers, 

MONTREAL, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




Factories :— Hull, Que. 

Branches :— Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg. 



Published 

WEEKLY- 
COOPER YEAR 




Published in tj?e interest of Qrooerj, banners, produce and provision Dealer$ 

and General Storekeepers. 



Vol. VII. 



TORONTO, JANUARY 13, 1893. 



No. 2 



it 6. McLEAN, 

President. 



HUGH C. McLEAN, 

Sec.-Treas 



THE J. B. McLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

AND 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

HEAD OFFICE: - . 10 Front St. E. 

MONTREAL OFFICE : - 146 St. James St. 

E. Desbarats, Manager. 

NEW YORK OFFICE: Room 41, Times Building. 

Roy V. Somervllle, Manager. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH : 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 



Advertisers and Subscribers may have their 
correspondence addressed to the care of any of 
our offices and hey are invited to use them at 
any time. At the Head office. Toronto, a place is 
set apart where they can see all the latest news- 
papers and the latest issues of trade papers from 
all parts of the world, where they can do their 
correspondence or obtain any information. Par- 
cels may also be directed to the Head office. 



Most people are aware by this time that 
the Southern Confederacy was unable to as- 
sert its separate corporate existence, and 
consequently that its credit is hardly a good 
basis to build up a fortune upon. The notes 
issued by its short-lived government as a 
medium of exchange have of course long been 
worthless as currency, though some value 
may attach to them as historical relics. The 
green goods men and their dupes are now 
endeavoring to revive the buying power of 
these notes, and their success will depend 
upon the carelessness or ignorance of the 
honest people to whom they are proffered. 
There were some green goods men base 
enough to outrage the confidence that is 
founded on the time-honored principle of 
> " Honor among thieves. " They have 
been mean enough to send bricks and 
packages of sawdust to the confiding crim- 
inals who sent them good money to pay for 
ten times its face value of counterfeit money. 
The conscience of these green goods men 
appears howwever to have been burdened by 
their sense of guilt, and now they are using 
their pals a little better, for they are sending 



them some of the bills of "The Confederate 
States of America." It is not supposed that 
even these are genuine, but their buying 
power is as good as that of the genuine bills, 
of which the source of issue was long ago 
defunct. It is reported that one enterprising 
business man m the province of Quebec in- 
vested $500 of good money in this counter- 
feit Secessionist money. Others may have 
got some of it too, so it is as well for traders 
to be on the look out for five, ten, and twenty 
dollar bills of "The Confederate States of 
America." There is also a new counterfeit 
of the $2 Dominion note that needs to be 
guarded against. Only a few days ago a 
specimen was brought for the first time under 
the notice of the Commissioner of the Dom- 
inion police. The counterfeit is printed from 
a wood cut, is very poorly executed and 
should easily be detected. The signatures 
are especially bad. But traders should get 
out of the habit of assuming that all money 
tendered them is good. It is necessary now- 
adays to examine it carefully, otherwise a 
new and constantly widening avenue of loss 
will be opened. 

* * 

Counterfeiters for the most part confine the 
exercise of their talents to the increase of 
the circulating medium. The art beloved by 
them is the making of money, in both senses 
of that phrase. But they occasionally find 
the production of other material that is of 
the nature of official vouchers or tokens to 
be profitable employment for their skill. 
They seldom descend to anything so low as 
postage stamps, as these call for too much 
trouble for little return, through they are sim- 
ple enough to invite imitation. Revenue 
stamps are of course valuable according to 
the amount of the duty borne by the article 
whose name is printed in the stamp, but in- 
dependently of that variability, there is the 
uncertainty of the tariff, which in these 
mutable times is likely to change suddenly, 



and cut down materially or abolish alto- 
gether a duty that made it worth while for 
crooked traders to take the risk of practising 
frauds on the revenue. Further, the perils 
of smuggling are not faced with the same 
hardihood in these degenerate times as they 
used to be. All these considerations no 
doubt influence enterprising counterfeiters 
and incline them to neglect revenue stamps. 
But it appears there is one man who be- 
lieves there is money in fraudulent revenue 
stamps, and a despatch from New York 
tells something about him. This man left 
an order a short time ago with an engraving 
company in that city to make him a plate of 
the Canadian 20 lb. tobacco revenue stamp. 
It is not said whether the stamp was an in- 
land revenue or a customs certificate, but it 
was most probably the latter, and intended 
to cover a contraband trade in United 
States manufactured tobacco. Unless he 
meditates a raid upon some of the bonded 
warehouses of our manufacturers or whole- 
salers^ is difficult to see bow he could make 
any money out of spurious excise stamps. 
It appears that the engraving company re- 
ported the matter to the United States Secret 
Service bureau, that when the man returned 
for the plate he was arrested, and that the 
United States and Canadian Governments 
are communicating with each other concern- 
ing him. The name given by the man was 
E. C. Wintele, and he represented himself 
as from Toronto. 

* * * 
Though an influential deputation of Mon- 
treal merchants last week waited on the 
Provincial Government again to ask the re- 
mission of the heavy tax that has been laid 
upon the commerce of that city, it is pretty 
certain they will be granted no relief. The 
deputation included the President of the 
Board of Trade, the president of the 
Chambre de Commerce, the president of 
the Corn Exchange, as well as other 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



. 



members of these bodies and of the com- 
mittee appointed by a general meeting of the 
merchants to deal with this subject of taxa- 
tion. The Provincial Treasurer, Hon. Mr. 
Hall, pointed out the necessity of meeting 
the province's temporary loan on the 16th 
July. A tax upon real estate was impracti- 
cable. The tax on personal property was 
likewise out of the question. The Govern- 
ment had at last to take to a tax levied on 
the rental value of business places. He 
showed that Montreal was paying less than 
half of the real estate tax, three-fifths of the 
license tax, and five-sixths of the commercial 
corporations tax. The deputation claimed 
that the rental tax should be collected from 
professional as well as business men. The 
taxes they considered unfairly distributed,and 
they would rather pay two years' taxes in one 
to tide the Government through its financial 
difficulty than to pay more than their fair 
proportion. The premier promised that the 
measure would be amended, but that the 
present year's taxes would have to be paid. 
* ■* * 

The Canada Salt Association is no more. 
It was dissolved on the last day of the old 
year. This was the consummation long 
looked forward to with the eyes of faith by 
the Patrons of Industry, and that body no 
doubt takes to itself the credit for bringing 
the thing to pass. But there is another 
claimant for the people's gratitude for the 
same public service, and that is the C. P. R. 
The President of that company says, in an 
interview published in the Empire, that the 
new salt works at Windsor were started in, 
the interest of the C. P. R. and the 
public, because the Association had closed 
the only salt works on the C. P. R. 
line, namely, those at Wingham. He 
is further reported to have said in the 
same connection, that since the railway com- 
pany could not properly engage in such an 
enterprise as the production of salt, " some 
of us" took hold of it as a private matter and 
the works at Windsor were the result. The 
C. P. R., he added, has nothing to do with 
these works, though they were started 
chiefly for its benefit. He states that the 
Windsor works would not have anything to 
do with the combine. In the Globe, Presi- 
dent Van Hume's statement that the As- 
sociation closed the works at Wingham is 
flatly contradicted by John Ransford, the 
secretary of the late Association. The 
secretary of the Association, says also that 
owing to new wells being started at More- 



town, Windsor, etc., it was felt impos- 
sible for the Association to continue. In his 
statement he also says that the salt manu- 
facturers feel especially aggrieved that a 
public institution like the C. P. R , which 
owes its inception and its present existence 
to the large sums of money that have been 
given to it by the taxpayers of the Dominion, 
should condescend to enter into a needless 
and wasteful competition in the manufacture 
of salt. The Association has resolved itself 
out of existence at any rate, and the price of 
salt may be expected to take a drop. Prices 
are at present nominally as they were, but 
they are certain to be lower as soon as trade 
begins to exercise its influence, which now 
entirely favors the buyer. Retail merchants 
will have nothing to gain by the break, be- 
cause they must now expect that every sale 
goes to the dealer making the lowest quota- 
tion. 

* * * 
The retail grocer or general merchant does 
not need to be told to avoir) high prices. 
But while he is seldom a party to the making 
of high prices, and while his influence is nearly 
always decidedly on the side of low prices, 
he cannot prevent the rise that is a conse- 
quence of shortage in the supply. He there- 
fore has high prices frequently to deal with, 
and should take note of incidental effects of 
them, where such are manifest and can be 
turned to account. He is aware that a great 
increase in the cost of any article is always 
attended by a shrinkage in the consump- 
tion of that article, everybody using less 
of it and many withdrawing the sup- 
port of their consumption entirely. It 
commonly happens that an alternative 
article is found to which the difference in 
the demand is transferred, and the trader 
ought always to be on the still hunt for such 
substitutes when the price of any staple is 
unusually high. That is the only way he can 
requite himself for the loss of trade in the 
dearer staple. When the price of tea was 
kept up by the retailers ten years ago, trade 
waned and the tea pedlar interloped and 
enriched himself between the consumer and 
the retailer. When oats grew so high about 
three years ago that they were deemed a 
good thing to speculate in, on account of 
their supposed indispensableness, consumers 
took to chopped feed, to corn, etc. Just now 
the price of flour is cheaper than ever it was 
before, but the city bakers charge the same 
price for bread as they did when flour was 
half as dear again. What is the result ? A 



great many housewives are baking their 
own bread, and the bakers are complaining 
of it. The price of pork is now at an ex- 
traordinarily high figure People who used 
pork from preference now use beef and 
mutton from economy. It is leported that 
some of the lumber firms are purchasing 
beef to supply their camps up north. Gco^ 
beef is about 5 '4c, while barrel pork is about 
9c. When flour is too dear people buy 
potatoes, unless they are also too dear. 
Thus very high prices estrange trade from 
the goods in which they hold, and the 
trader ought to think of this, both when he 
is tempted to speculate in an advancing 
commodity and when he finds the call lor 
that commodity declining. 

* 
The diluted advertisement is a failure. 
The funny paragraph or sensational item 
that ends with a trader's advertisement in 
lower case letters is about the most repellant 
bid for business that could be adopted. 
Nobody likes to be fooled. Consequently 
the feelings with which a man comes to your 
name are iust about the most unpropitious 
for the favorable impression you want to 
make that they could well be. If you under- 
took to guy a customer of common sense and 
self respect, in your own store, and tried to 
excite his interest simply to wind up with 
some irritating and senseless joke turned on 
him, he vould cease to be your customer 
probably from that moment. Aside from the 
disagreeable effect of such insinuating ad- 
vertisements, they impress the reader with a 
very unflattering opinion of yourself. The 
advertiser is decided to be a very light- 
headed, inconsequential person, for whom a 
considerable degree of contempt is felt by 
the irritated reader. Somebody else will get 
the bulk of that reader's business. 

♦ * * 

The almanac would appear to be hard 
pressed, between the publication of the 
weather probabilities in the daily newspapers 
on the one hand, and the annual distribution 
of calendars by advertisers on the other. 
These two agencies have long threatened to 
supersede it as an authority on the weather 
and current chronology. But the old house- 
hold favorite seems to have an abiding place 
in the people's affections. It has never been 
successfully rivalled for long range weather 
predictions. The farmers still turn to it with 
faith, to see when the last snow of the winte. 1 
will fall, it is still the orthodox refeij 
ence for dates, and its ancient jokel 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



continue to delight the weary agriculturist 
who stays home from church. An almanac 
can be used (or backward as well as forward 
reference, while the past part of a calendar 
is stripped off. Then the calendar does 
not give the changes of the moon, upon 
which hog-kilhng,soap-boiIing, tree-pruning, 
V^eep-washing, and so many other vital in- 
terests depend. Even if the people all took 
a daily paper and were all in daily view of a 
tram with the weather signals on it, they 
would still want their almanac. The alma- 
nac has worked itself into the domestic life 
of the country more than many more useful 
and necessary things have done,and the tra- 
der will oblige many an old customer by 
keeping a few for distribution. The other 
day a man of bucolic dress and demeanor 
dropped into a drug store in town and asked 
for an almanac. He was asked which he 
preferred, but being rather uncertain, the 
fluent clerk recommended X's, which he de- 
clared hit the weather to a t last year. This 
settled the granger's choice, and X's alma- 
nac was taken. 



feed this surplus to the live stock, they will 
have to accept a price which allows shippers 
some margin to work on, and then money 
can be made. 

But the blame for the disastrous results of 
last season to shippers rested far more with 
themselves than with the fruit growers. They 
started cries of short crops, rushed in and 
bid up prices, and kept on doing so, so that 
it was not surprising that holders in the 
counfy held on. With all this experience in 
mind it will be their own fault next year if 
buyers don't profit by it and refuse to pay 
hiijh prices on crop scores, unless they are 
justified in doing so by possitive and unmis- 
takable information. 



h 



DRESSED HOGS IN MONTREAL. 



A BAD YEAR IN APPLES. 



Dealers in dressed hogs in Montreal have 
manifested considerable excitement during 
the past week on account of some large pur- 
chases in Ontario, and the news from Chi- 
cago, which gives evidence of a decided 
scarcity in hog meat. Buyers in Montreal 
have paid as high as $8 20 in the west, or 
equivalent to $8.25 to $8.35 laid down in 
Montreal tor car load lots, and the general 



During the early fall 
red to heavy losses made by Canadian ship- 
pers on early fall apples, pointing out that 
the chiet cause of this was the high price 
which, through unnecessary competition be- 
tween buyers, had been paid in the country 
for early fruit. Since then some shippers 
have pulled out a little on the later shipments, 
but the results of the season as a whole this 
year have been to forcibly demonstrate the 
utter folly of such a proceeding as the one 
referred to above. During the week, a lead- 
ing Montreal shipper, F. J. Hart, of Hart & 
Tuckwell, returned from an extended visit to 
Great Britain, and the personal investiga- 
tions he made while over there bear out 
what we have said on the matter. , 

After remarking that the apple trade was 
not a successful one for the middleman this 
year, Mr. Hart proceeds to explain the 
causes of this. The chief one in his opinion 
was the heavy shipments. of early apples 
which were dumped on the English market 
just as a large quantity of home-grown Bri- 
tish fruit had to be sold. The English peo- 
ple therefore had a surfeit of early apples, 
and when winter stock commenced to arrive 
it had to face an unfavorable market, besides 
competing with French oranges. In fact 
Mr. Hart is opposed to shipping early fruit 
at all, and thinks that the only remedy is to 
Abstain from doing so, and ship good keep- 
ing properly packed winter stock. 

This course would be desirable no doubt 
to the shippers in Montreal and elsewhere, 
but it is hardly possible, for something has 
to be done wit^ the early fall apples, as it is 
extremely doubtful that the fruit growers 
will adopt Mr. Hart's advice and cut down 
their early fall trees. No, they made too 
. much money this fall, so if they don't want to 



>JL.expectation is for much higher prices..' In 
fact some of the more sanguine operators 



profess to see the possibility of big profits in 
store for them on the small lots they hold, 
for this is the single drop of disappointment 
in their cup of satisfaction, that they do not 
control anything like their usual quantity of 
stock. There can be no doubt that the re- 
ceipts of dressed hogs in Montreal have been 
much smaller this year than for a long time, 
and the presumption is that the same state 
of affairs rules elsewhere. But whether we 
are to have a scarcity similar to the remark- 
able experience of 1868 is another matter, 
and a development not safe to calculate on. 
At present the continued spell of clear, cold 
weather has helped to increase the firmness, 
so that holders now hardly know what to 
ask. 



HAMILTON 
RETAIL GROCERS' ASSOCIATION, 

The Retail Grocers' Association of Hami- 
lton, eleeted officers on the 3d inst,, as fol- 
lows : 

D. Winnifrith, president. 

Adam Ballentine, first vice-president. 

G. Elder, second vice-president. 

C. Bremner, treasurer. 

W. R. Harvey, secretary. 

John Ronan, J. O. Carpenter, O. H. Pee- 
bles, J. Main, T. Hazell, executive committee. 

C. Holt, G. Powell, auditors. 

B. Winnifrith in the chair. 

W. J. O'Brien was proposed as a new 
member. 

A letter was received from Hon. J. M. 
Gibson to the effect that the resolution pass- 
ed by the association recently.regarding the 
weekly payment of wages, would receive the 
attention of the Ontario Government. 



TORONTO 
RETAIL GROCERS' ASSOCIATION. 

r — 

The Toronto Retail Grocers' Association 
held its January meeting on Monday even- 
ing in its rooms in Richmond Hall. The 
following were present : Messrs. Booth, 
Clark, Gibson, White, Mills, Westren, Mc- 
Millan, Saunders, Doyle, Bond, Butcher, 
Cleary, Johnston, Roberts. 

The minutes were read and duly con- 
firmed. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION, 

The motion of which Mr. Gibson gave 
notice at the last meeting was moved by 
Mr. Gibson, seconded by Mr. McMillan. It 
was that the constitution be so amended 
that the nominations to offices be made at 
the last meeting of the old year and the 
elections be held on the first meeting of the 
new year. 

After some discussion this motion was 
amended so as to make the November meet- 
ing the time for nominations and December 
meeting the time for elections. In this 
amended form the motion was carried. 

Mr. McMillan withdrew the motion of 
which he gave notice at last meeting, and of 
which the object was similar. 

Mr. Roberts' motion of which notice was 
given, to amend the constitution so as to 
make 10.30 the time for adjournment, was 
proposed by Mr. Westren, seconded by Mr. 
Mills, and carried unanimously. 
NEW MEMBERS. 

J. Ferguson, W. R. Kindree and R. Row- 
land were proposed for membership and 
duly elected. 

THE ANNUAL REPORT. 

The following is a report on the pt ogress 
of the Association for the present year up to 
the present date : 

SPECIAL FUND. 

Jan 1st. There was $526.68 

Oct. 11 Added from general fund 70.00 
Nov. 4. Int. to that date 19 79 

$616.47 
Nov. 14. Donated to Charity. . . 200.00 

Balance on hand $416.47 

GENERAL FUND. 

Balance on hand January $244.59 

(With liabilities $187.16) 

Rec'd for tickets of At-Home. . . 328.85 

Fees Collected 31500 

$888 44 
Paid out by Warrant 859.02 

Balance on hand *, $ 29.42 

MEMBERS. 

In Jan, 68 now accepted as basis. To 
these 120 have been added who have paid 
fees. Total 188. Audited and found cor- 
rect. 

/c.„~-a -i M. McMillan. 

(Signed.) Fr£D s Roberts 

Mr. Mills said the Treasurer should be 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



present to answer any questions that might 
arise out of items in the report. 

Mr. Clark moved that the report be re- 
ceived and adopted. Mr. Johnston seconded 
this motion and it was passed'. 

THE AT HOME COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Gibson reported progress by the At 
Home committee. He believed this at home 
would be one of the most successful yet held. 
The tickets were in demand and a large 
number of people were desirous of attending. 
INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS. 

President Booth rose and said that he now 
laid down the gavel for his year of tenure. 
He heartily thanked the members for their 
courteous and considerate support.and he be- 
spoke an equally helpful support for his suc- 
cessor, president-elect Clark. He then call- 
ed upon Mr. Mills to formally install the 
officers. 

Mr. Mills said that it became his pleasur- 
able duty to introduce into their offices his 
fellow-members who had been elected to the 
responsibility of directing the Association for 
another year. He hoped they would be well 
seconded by the members in their efforts to 
do their duty faithfully. He reminded the 
Association that there was still work to be 
done, and hoped that officers and members 
would labor to do it well. He then intro- 
duced by name each of the officers who were 
present in graceful words. 

President Clark on being conducted to the 
chair thanked the members for his election, 
and hoped that harmonious and energetic 
work would be done this year. There was 
work to be done, and there were good men 
to do it. He would like to see the members, 
as well as capable outsiders, contributing 
special papers on various trade subjects, and 
proposed to call on members for such papers. 
A question box ought also to be adopted, as 
thereby much light might be thrown upon 
troublesome questions. He suggested as well 
that there should be a blackboard in the 
meeting room on which entries of goods for 
sale might be placed, to give members a 
chance to offer any excess of stock. 

Mr. Gibson approved the new ideas pro- 
posed by the new chairman, and particular- 
ly favored papers or lectures by specialists, 
members of the Association, wholesalers, 
travellers, and others qualified. 

Mr. Mills in appropriate terms moved a 
vote of thanks to the retiring president, Mr. 
Booth, and to all the officers. 

Mr. Saunders seconded this motion, and 
it was unanimously carried and tendered by 
the President. 

Mr. Booth acknowledged the vote. 

ACKNOWLEU0MENTS. 

The receipt of the $50 donations by 
the St. George's Society and St. Andrew's 
Society was gratefully acknowledged in com- 
munications which were formally received. 
SWELLED CANNED GOODS. 

The letter from the Hamilton Association 
read at last meeting, in relation to swelled 
canned goods, and advising co-operation on 



the part of associations to get the views of 
the wholesale trade at the various centres 
was brought up again. 

Mr. Gibson said both jobbers and canners 
always took back swelled heads. They took 
all back cheerfully, so far as his experience 
went. 

Mr. White said the retailers had to do not 
with the packers, but with the jobbers, whom 
he always found ready to take sweeled goods 
back. Therefore the retailers had no ground 
of complaint. 

Moved by Mr. White, seconded by Mr. 
Gibson, that the secretary inform the Hamil- 
ton Association that Toronto wholesalers 
always take swelled goods back. — Carried. 

Mr. Gibson moved that the Executive 
Committee take into their consideration 
whether it would not be advisable to invite 
some gentleman every alternate meeting to 
address the Association on trade questions. 
Mr. Westren seconded this. 

Mr. Booth thought that the Association 
was in a position to consider this matter of 
itself, without referring to the executive. 
There could be no two opinions about the 
value of such matter as was contemplated in 
the proposed arrangements for specialists to 
read papers before the Association. As an 
illustration of how much good could be done 
in tr is way, he referred to the paper on Tea, 
read before the Hamilton Association by 
Harold Lambe, and published in The Ca- 
nadian Grocer. That was an excellent 
paper, and he was sure his fellow-members 
would bear him out in that opinion, for he 
made no doubt they had all read it, as he 
assumed they all took The Grocer and 
regularly read it. If they did not they ought 
to. The article was full of useful informa- 
tion, and contained much that was unknown 
to most grocers. 

Several members spoke in favor of the 
Association dealing directly with the pro- 
posal. 

Mr. Mills favored the initiating of the 
matter through the Executive Committee to 
arrange details and prepare the matter for 
the consideration of the Association. An- 
other idea he favored was the occasional 
meeting of the members of the Association 
at the Public Library to consult works bear- 
ing specially on the grocery trade. An ar- 
rangement had been made for the improve- 
ment of the skilled and scientific knowledge 
of mechanics, to whom the use of special 
books had been thrown open on given even- 
ings by the Library Board, and the same 
thing might be done for the grocers. 

In amendment, Mr. Booth moved, second- 
ed by Mr. Bond.that the President, Vice Pre- 
sident and the mover be a committeeto con- 
sider the plan of arranging with trade spec- 
ialists to read papers and lectures before the 
Association every other meeting evening. 

The resoluton was withdrawn and the 
amendment substituted and passed. 
A TEA BOOK. 

The Secretary suggested that a Tea Book 



be compiled by the Association. He thought 
a very useful one could be put together. The 
matter was no further pursued. 
ACCOUNTS. 
A post card account of $1.75 was ordered 
to be paid. 

THE TOBACCO TAX. 

Mr. Mills reminded the meeting that the 
tobacco tax was now due, and that all shou'd 
govern themselves accordingly. 

Mr. Johnston knew a man who was sell- 
ing tobacco, cigars and cigarettes to minors. 
He moved that the Secretary write com- 
plaining of him to the inspector. The motion 
was not seconded 

The meeting then adjourned. 



MISREPRESENTING GOODS 

There is little question but that, theoretic- 
ally, the average merchant subscribes to the 
highest ethics of shop-keeping He finds, 
indeed, a certain moral satisfaction when 
giving his concurrence to the opinions of 
speakers and writers on trade topics, who 
assume to teach from an elevated point of 
view, and though it is a question when, after 
all, in the practical application of such theor- 
ies, there is not a great deal of divergence 
from the theory itself, possibly the tempta- 
tion to have a lower code of business ethics 
than what is conceived to be absolutely just, 
has its strongest force in the matter of re- 
presenting goods to customers. 

An esteemed English contemporary sug- 
gests that "there is a song of a not very ele- 
vated character which carries the refrain, 
'It's all right, if you love the girl,' and we 
fear," it adds, "there may be here and there 
a tradesman who sings as a lullaby to his 
own conscience, 'It's all right, if you sell the 
goods.' But is it ? Is it even all safe and 
prudent and good policy ?' 

While this may be regarded as shifting 
the question to a very much lower plane, it 
has the advantage of attracting more atten- 
tion. Our English contemporary argues 
that the chief reason for a lowering in ethi- 
cal consideration of the pratical side of this 
question is that "we all know how to live 
uprightly and won't, whereas we do not know 
how to make fortunes, and wish we did." It, 
undoubtedly, is true that business morally 
has a much better chance, if the odds are in 
favor of its paying a dividend in hard cash. 

The solution of this question in a way that 
deals fairly with the consumer and satisfies 
him, and justifies the merchant's own con- 
science, even when tried rigidly by the stand- 
ard of the highest business ethics, is to hand- 
le only good goods. 

We have no question that a man is a bet- 
ter man, better satisfied with himself, better 
contented with his business, moie successful 
in his business, more popular with his cus- 
tomers, and more likely to obtain larger cus- 
tom, if he sells goods that he does not feel' 
he is compelled to misrepresent in order to 
"make them move." Good goods at fair 
prices, when put into practical effect, there- 
fore satisfies not only the moral, but the 
material side of the merchant's life. There 
can be no possible reason why a merchant 
should not adopt that motto as his own, and 
put it into practical operation. Poor goods 
at any price do not pay in the long run. 
Good goods at a fair price always pay. — 
Michigan Tradesman. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TWO PICTURES. 

NO. 2.— CREDIT. 
It was a beautiful summer's morning. 
The sun shone brightly in the clear blue 
sky. Not a cloud was to be seen, all nature 
seemed to be smiling in sweet content, and 
the birds warbled forth their sweet songs as 
if their little hearts would burst with joy. It 
"Was a sweet scene, and I myself felt at peace 
with all mankind, as I sauntered down the 
street meditating upon the marvellous works 
of nature, and from nature my thoughts 
travelled to nature's God. I could not help 
but wonder how it was that man seemed to 
be the only dissatisfied creature upon the 
face of the globe, and then I began to won- 
der why was it that he of all creatures the 
one who ought to be the most contented and 
satisfied, the one who has most to be thank- 
ful for, the one lor whose use all things were 
made, and intelligence given him to teach 
him how to utilize them, was the most dis- 
satisfied of all. Thus thinking and being 
unable to account for this state of things, I 

thought I would take a walk over to B 

street and see my friend Brown. I thought 
that he being a grocer and coming into con- 
tact with all kinds and conditions of human 
nature, I would be able through his insight 
into the hearts of his customers perhaps to 
solve the problem. So I walked leisurely 
over, and entering his store I found him 
busy behind the counter. He wasnip to his 
eyes in work, the counter was just strewn 
with orders, so he did not notice me as I 
entered. I could not help but look at him. 
There he was working like a slave with his 
sleeves rolled up and the perspiration rolling 
down his cheeks. Talk about excitement ; 
why, he was as excited as if there had just 
«en a fire in the place and he had just got 
over putting it out. He would shout to one 
clerk, and then to the driver to hurry up, and 
see that this was right, and the other right. 
"Here, Jim," he would shout, "see that 
Jones' oranges are in the box, and you, Bill, 
see that Simpson's get their coal oil, and 
don't put it near the other things or else it 
will spoil them, and they will be coming 
back and telling me that the butter and tea 
taste of coal oil, and I'll be that much out. 
Coal oil is a bad thing to have near groceries ; 
it has a worse effect almost than smoking in 
a store." With this he looked up and saw 
me. With a smile he extended his hand, 
and said, " Why, bless my heart, where 
have you been all this time ? I thought you 
were dead, I have not seen you for so long." 
" Well, I have been out of town, I said, and 
just got back yesterday, and as I was going 

down B street I was thinking over some 

things which I could not understand myself, 
and which I thought you by your experience 
of human nature could perhaps explain to 
me, so I decided to come over and see you. 
But I see you are very busy, and I will not 
disturb you at present, but take a more con- 
venient season." "Well," said he, "if it is 



anything that will occupy much time I guess 
you had better, as you see I am very busy 
and will be so until night, but I tell you if 
you could make it convenient to come over 
to the house to-night at 8 o'clock, I will be 
free from that time all evening, and would 
enjoy your company very much, as I have 
not had a good chat since the last time you 
were over, old boy. Can you do that ?" Not 
having anything on hand that night, and 
seeing that he was really very busy, I told 
him that I would be there sharp at 8 o'clock. 
" By the by, " I said, " I heard you say that 
coal oil was as bad for spoiling groceries as 
smoking. Do any grocers smoke in their 
stores ?" " Well, I should think so," he said. 
"Why, some of them have the pipe or cigar 
in their mouth from morning till night, and 
quite a few can trace their failure to that 
habit." " How is that ?" I asked. "Well," 
he replied, " in the first place the tea, butter, 
spices and provisions absorb the nicotine 
from the smoke, the smoke hangs to every- 
thing, and by and bye the store begins to 
look cloudy and dirty, the goods don't taste 
the same, and you catch the nasty, musty 
smell as soon as you enter the store com- 
ing in from the fresh air. By and by, 
Ladies of any delicacy of taste sicken at the 
smell, and by and by they cease calling and 
without giving any reason. If you meet 
them out in company you will here them 
sometimes say, " I used to deal there but I 
don't go now. There is something about it 
I don't like; it seems dirty, and there is al- 
ways a musty smell of smoke about it, just 
like the smell of a coat that has been in a 
bar room all night." " Well sir," I said, " I 
guess you are right. Women are particular 
on these points, and it is not a pleasant 
thought." " Oh," he said, " it is too true, I 
know several stores I call on that have that 
nasty smell." " Well," I said, " I will wish 
you good day for the present and call and 
see you at 8 o'clock sharp." "All right,' 
I'll be home." So I left him and went down 
town to my own office, pondering all the 
way upon what he had said. 

That night I kept my appointment. If 
the morning was fine the night could not be 
surpassed. The moon shone brightly 
through a cloudless blue sky. It was neither 
too hot nor too cold, just a lovely night for a 
walk. According to promise I wended my 
w*y up to Brown's. Arriving at the door I 
knocked, and in a few minutes the door was 
opened by a child of about seven years of 
ago. She looked at me as if she was afraid 
of me, and wanted to shrink into a corner 
out of sight. She looked as if she never 
knew what a kind look was. I asked her in 
a warm friendly way if her father was in, 
and in a kind of half hesitating way, as if 
she was afraid she should make a mistake, 
and as a consequence get a beating, she 
said, "Yes, sir, I think so, I will go and 
see," and leaving me standing in the hall 
she went to see, and I heard her tell her 
father, for I could tell it was him by the 



sound of his voice, that a man wanted to see 
him at the door. " Well, why didn't you 
tell him to come in?" said he in a sharp 
impatient voice, and with that he came out 
into the hall himself, and seeing it was I 
said, " oh it is you, is it ! Come in and sit 
down." Obeying his invitation, I followed 
him through the hall, which was lightened 
by a lamp, which according to appearances 
had forgotten to shine, the little girl keeping 
behind me as if she was afraid of getting a 
slap on the ear for being so dull. Passing 
through the hall we entered through the 
door into the sitting room. Entering through 
the sitting room door, a cold chill passed 
through me, and a keen sense of confusion 
all around took possession of me. The room 
in the first place was not properly heated. 
The floor was carpeted with an old carpet, 
which looked as if it had been used for a 
century. The fire in the grate had retreated 
as if it were in disgust, and left nothing but 
ashes to remind you of the past. In the 
centre of the room stood an old square table 
upon which stood a lamp, which from its 
appearance seemed to be struggling for a 
breath of oxvgen upon which to live,and the 
glass looked as if it was in mourning over 
its fruitless efforts. Upon this table also 
lay a ledger, two or three day books, about 
two dozen pass books and several other 
books, and a lot of bill heads. Kneeling 
down under the table was a woman which 
proved to be his wife. She was hunting 
through an old waste paper basket for some 
invoices which he had mislaid in his hurry. 
She looked up at me as we entered and 
smiled a welcome. I don't think I will ever 
forget that face. The eyes were kindly, but 
oh such a sorrowful look shone through 
them. You could read the whole book of 
her life at once. It was a tale of sorrow, 
worry and anxiety, the lines around the 
mouth told of sadness and care. The ex- 
pression was that of one who had lost all 
relish of life and desired to be at rest, as if 
death itself would be a sweet relief. She 
smiled as well as she could, and extending 
her hand wished me to take a seat, which I 
did while he tried to coax back the retreat- 
ing fire, but it was no use, for it had disap- 
peared never to return again. Beside the 
grate was his other little girl. She was 
trying to make mud pies out of what the re- 
treating fire had left. Beside her lay a cat, 
which looked as if it too had been trying to 
wash itself in the pies which the little girl 
was trying to make, and it seemed to suc- 
ceed admirably, for its coat seemed to be 
pretty well matted. Not far away lay a big 
Newfoundland dog which looked as if he 
would only like to get a bone or two to help 
fill out his skin. Such was the house I had 
come to spend the evening in, and I suppose 
it is needless for me to tell you that I was 
sorry that I had nrt stayed at home and 
tried to solve my problems myself, instead 
of coming to this barn to only wish that it 
was time to get out. However, I was in it, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



and I could only wait patiently till I got out 
ol it as easily as I could without offending 
any one, so I broke the ice by saying, 
" Well, you seem to be as busy in the house 
as you were in the store." " Well, yes," he 
replied, " I hardly ever have a moment to 
spare. When I'm not at the counter, I have 
to be at my books," " You must do a large 
business," I said. " Yes, I do, but it would 
be better lor me and all concerned if I did 
not do so much." " How is that ? " I asked. 
".Well, don't you see," he said, "I do a 
large business but it is principally credit, I 
have to lie a long time out of my money, 
which if I got when it was due I could be 
doubling and trebling, but I can't get it in, 
and sometimes I never get it. I have lost 
about a thousand dollars this year in bad 
debts, and if I had that now I could get a 
new carpet for this floorwhich needs it badly 
enough, and I could get my wife a dress fit 
to go out in ; she has to stay home from 
church now because she has not one fit to 
goto church with, so stays home. Then my 
children ; I could get them things which 
they need butjhave to do without. My wife 
worries herself to death over it, and her 
worrying makes her nasty with the children, 
and that makes them unhappy and all caused 
by this cursed credit system. I wish to the 
Lord something could be done whereby 
this confounded system could be done away 
with. Why, look here,he said, as he walked 
over to a bureau and took out a big cabinet 
album, " I've got some of the cusses in this 
that owe me money for the last year. Just 
look here," and he opened the album, " do 
you see that fine dressed lady there? See 
the fine seal skin cap and seal jacket she has 
on. Look at the style of her. She owes me 
$150 for groceries. I kept her and her 
husband all last winter when he was out of a 
job, and when he got into something 
and was earning good pay I asked them to 
let me have some money, and she flew up 
on her ear and got insulted, and I have not 
seen her since. I hear she is dealing some- 
where else and paying cash, and he came 
round and told me he would pay me a dollar 
a week until it was paid. He paid that for 
one or two weeks and that was the end of 
bim. My wite ought to be wearing those 
furs. Here is another specimen. Do you 
see that big fine looking fellow there with his 
whiskers all brushed up like a man who had 
been all his life in the military service ? 
Well, that is Mr. E. R. He is a shipbuilder, 
and built a few boats that sail the waters. 
Well, he is one of the worst dead beats in 
this town. That man was getting twelve 
hundred dollars a year, and he owes me 
$150 for this last five years." "Well," I 
said, "why don't you get it out of him?" 
"Why don't I? Just because he always 
drew his salary ($25 a week) in advance, and 
because some of the laws regarding these 
matters in this country are rotten. I had 
him up on a warrant of committal which ex- 
pired in 90 days. I got judgment against 



him. He by order of the judge had to pay 
me $5 a month. He paid me the first $5 at 
the end of thirty days. 'He paid me the 
second five at the end of the sixty. At the 
expiration of the 90 days he paid me nothing, 
but snapped his fingers at me and laughed, 
because he knew I could do nothing, for the 
time having run out, he knew I would have 
to get another warrant of committal, which 
would cost me as much and more than he 
had paid me on the whole thing. Then, 
again, if he has two or three judgments out 
against him he can go and get what you call 
a stop order. He explains to the judge that 
these two or three are weighing him down, 
and he will not issue another judgment until 
he gets these paid, which at the rate he was 
paying me would be never. That is the way 
things are run in this country. That man's 
wife and family can afford to take a trip to 
California and back on my money, and put 
on all the style imaginable, while mine has 
to stay here and work like an old drudge. 
Her life is a misery, and it makes her cranky 
with the children, and they get miserable 
and don't look like other people's children. 
I'm miserable, she is miserable, and the 
children are miserable, and it is all through 
this cursed credit system." 



POINTS FOR THE DAIRYMEN. 

The Australian butter makers have been 
for a long time using every effort to intro- 
duce their butter into the English market, 
without success.but by the aid of Preservttas 
they have at last established themselves on 
a sound footing in that market of unlimited 
consumption. 

As will be seen from the extracts from 
Australian papers, which are given below, the 
butter in which Preservitas is used com- 
mands four pence more per pound than but- 
ter prepared by the old process. 

This is a subject of vital importance to the 
dairymen as well as this whole country, for 
the reason that it opens up an enormous 
market and high prices for a commodity, 
which Canada can produce in any quantity, 
and which in value of output would far ex- 
ceed the cheese industry. Readers who are 
interested in dairies might find it to their 
advantage to correspond with Mr. Edgar of 
Halifax, who is agent for this product 

Extract from the Melbourne Argus of March 12th, 
1890. 

" At the invitation of Messrs. F. T. Paten 
& Co., agents for the ' Steven's Cold Vacuum 
Process,' Mr. D. Wilson, the Government 
dairy expert, with a number of gentlemen in- 
terested in butter preserving, met at the 
offices of the Fresh Food and Frozen Stor- 
age Company yesterday. Mr. Wilson, on 
behalf of the Agricultural Department, super- 
intended the tinning of a sample lot of Vic- 
torian fresh butter by 'Steven's Cold Vacuum 
Process.' For the purpose of testing the 
value of this process, Mr. Wilson had half- 
a-dozen tins filled with the same churning of 
butter, in three of which tins an ounce of 



1 Preservitas' was mixed. In the other three 
tins the butter was done up as it is usually 
sent to market. These six tins were placed 
in the same case with the six tins of butter 
subjected to the Cold Vacuum process, and 
at the end of two months the tins will be 
opened, and the state of each lot of butter 
tested. The whole of the tins were placed 
in a box, which was sealed in the presence 
of the gentlemen present, and on the 10th of ' 
May the same gentlemen will be called to- 
gether again, when the box will be opened 
and the state of the butter examined. 
Extract from the Daily Telegraph, Melbourne, 
May 17th, 1890. 

"It will be recollected that two months 
ago a meeting was held at the offices of the 
Fresh Food and Frozen Storage Company, 
Limited, to test the advantages of preserving 
butter by means of ' Steven's Cold Vacuum 
Policy.' For the purpose of testing the value 
of this process the services of Mr. David 
Wilson, the Government dairy expert, were 
called into requisition, and he decided to fill 
six tins by Steven's process — three tins with- 
out any treatment (except adding salt, in fact 
just as butter is sent to the market), and 
three tins with the addition of ' Preservitas.' 
It was then decided to leave these three lots 
of butter for two months in the hands of the 
Fresh Food and Storage Company, Limited, 
and a meeting was held yesterday on their, 
premises, when the tins were opened by Mr. 
Wilson, who called aside two others, well- 
known as experts in butter, and on their re- 
turn to the meeting it was announced that 
the butter treated with ' Preservitas ' was 
most decidedly the best, in fact, Mr. Wilson 
said he never saw anything so emphatically 
decided. The butter treated with ' Preser- 
vitas ' retained all the fine natural aroma of 
butter, which this lot was known to have 
when the butter was put into tins, and in this 
connection it should be mentioned that all 
the three lots put down were from the same 
churning of butter, made under the super- 
vision of Mr. Wilson, and he pronounced the 
butter treated with ' Preservitas ' to be 
worth at least 4d. per pound more than the 
other." 
Extract from The Age, Melbourne, May 16th, 1890. 

" Some two months or so ago quantities of 
butter from the same churning were tinned 
under three different processes, at offices of 
the Fresh Food and Frozen Storage Com- 
pany, Bourke Street West, in order to deter- 
mine which was the most satisfactory man- 
ner of treating the butter. The three pro- 
cesses were as follows : — 

" r. Treating the butter in the usual way 
by the addition of salt. 

" 2. Treating it by what is known as the 
Vacuum process. 

" 3. By the application of salt and the ad- 
dition of ' Preservitas.' 

"Yesterday morning a number ot gentle- 
men interested in the tests assembled at the 
offices of the Company, and the experts on 
whose decision the promoters of the different 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



processes relied were — Mr. D. Wilson (the 
Government Dairy Expert representing the 
Agricultural Department), Mr. Vagg (of the 
Chilled Butter Company), Mr. Taylor (a 
salesman in the service of the Fresh Food 
and Storage Company), and Mr. McDonald 
(Dairyman of the Mount Wallace district). 
The tins of butter having been opened and 
tested the four experts were unanimous in 
the opinion that of the three tests the ' Pre- 
servitas' treatment was by far the most suc- 
cessful, and that the butter treated by that 
process would fetch fully 4d. per pound more 
in the market than the butter treated under 
the other two processes." 

Extract from the Melbourne Argus, May 16th 
1890. 

"Some two months ago the preliminary 
steps for testing the different methods of 
preserving butter were taken at the stores of 
the Fresh Food and Frozen Storage Com- 
pany, Bourke Street. Samples of butter 
from one churning were packed by the Gov- 
ernment dairy expert, Mr. David Wilson, 
according to three different methods, the 
first as ordinarily salted for the market, the 
second by Steven's Cold Aii Vacuum Pro- 
cess, and the third with a compound known 
as • Preservitas.' On the samples being ^i 
opened yesterday they were submitted to 
the judgment of experts, who were unani- 
mous as to the superiority of that treated 
with ' Preservitas' which, in Mr. Wilson's 



cellar, where the case remained sealed until 
this morning. On opening the case this 
morning the butter was tasted by a number 
of experts, who had assembled for the pur- 
pose of proving which was the better pro- 
cess — the ' Preservitas' or the Stevens — and 
their opinion was that the butter preserved 
with ' Preservitas' was unmistakably superior 
to the other samples, and worth at least 3d. 
to 4d. per pound more in market value." 

Extract from the Evening Standard, Melbourne, 
May 16th, 1890. 

'• We have been requested to mention 
that Francis Forrest and Company, of 484 
Collins Street, Melbourne, are agents for The 
Preservitas Company of London, whose 
treatment of butter was yesterday proved to 
be so successful at the trial which was held 
at the offices of the Fresh Food and Frozen 
Storage Company, Limited." 

Sole proprietors : The Preservitas Com- 
pany, no, 112 Southwark Street, London, 
S. E. Samples and all paiticulars relating 
to " Preservitas" may be obtained from the 
agent, M. F. Eagar, 181, 183 Water Street, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. 



STOCK-TAKING. 



The time to take inventory is of but mi- 
nor importance, but it should be taken when 
practicable, at the dullest season of the year 
in the locality where your business is. My 
opinion, was worth at least 4d. per pound j judgment is that for an annual inventory 
more than either of the other samples." / Feb 1 is a particularly good time.! The rush 
Extract from The Herald, Melbourne, May I5th\ of the holiday trade is over and the bulk of 
1890. \ the winter stock has been sold, the spring 

"A quantity of the same churning of but- ' purchases have not been made, and in the 
ter was submitted two months ago to three / majority of stores the stock is at the lowest ; 
tests, viz. — by the Steven's Vacuum ProcessJ besides, at this season the average prices on 
by ' Preservitas,' and by salt, as generally >general commodities are at their lowest points/, 
sent to the market. At the office of the Procure a book with day book ruling of about 



by reason of use and wear. This being proper- 
ly done, go carefully over your ledger and in- 
ventory on your book all the accounts receiv- 
able,giving a line to each customer. Then fol- 
low this by all notes due to you from your cus- 
tomers, adding interest to date of your stock- 
taking. Then add the balanceof cash on hand 
and in bank. When this is finished you will 
have a detailed statement of your assets. On 
the following pages make an inventory of 
your liabilities. From your ledger or your 
files, make a statement of all bills you owe 
that have been put in stock before you began 
your inventory. Follow this with a state- 
ment of all notes due merchants for goods 
purchased,or due the banks for money loaned, 
or from individuals for use in your business 
and rent unpaid, if any. When this is done 
take a double page, heading one 'Assets' and 
the other 'Liabilities.' Under these arrange 
the footings of the inventory, which should 
appear as follows : 

Assets. Liabilities. 

Mdse on hand 

Notes receivable 

Cash in bank 

Cash in store 

Book accounts (good).. 

" doubtful W value.. 

Balance present worth. Feb.l, 1892. 

"I forgot to state that an account must be 
kept of sales made during the stocktaking of 
goods, which have not been inventoried. 
These to be added to the final footings of 
your stock less, say, 20 per cent, the average 
gross profit. This is necessary, as your book 
accounts are only inventoried to the day when 
your stocktaking begins. This method, while 
crude, is substantially accurate,and will give 
you a basis for next year's work by which not 
only the present worth may be known, but 
also the loss or gain for the year." — Store 
Crank in American Grocer. 



Fresh Food and Frozen Storage Company, 
Bourke Street West, an inspection of re- 
sults was made to-day. Mr. Wilson, the 
Government, dairy expert, and two other 
gentlemen qualified to judge, decided with- 
out hesitation that the butter treated with 
' Preservitas' came out worth at least 4d. per 
pound more than the others." 

Extract from the Evening Standard, Melbourne, 
May 15th 1890. 

"About two months ago, when a number 
of farmers and others interested in dairy 
produce met at the offices of the Fresh Food 
and Frozen Storage Company, Limited, 
Bourke Street West, to test the ' Stevens's 
Cold Vacuum Process' of preserving butter, 
Mr. David Wilson, the Government dairy 
expert, who was present, representing the 
Agricultural Department, recommended 
that twelve tins of the same churning should 
be stowed away for a period of two months, 
in order to practically test the process. This 
was done. Half-a-dozen tins of the Stevens's 
Cold Vacuum Process, three tins with ' Pre- 
servitas,' and three of the butter as ordinarily 
prepared for the market, were placed in a 
box and put in a box and put in a case in the 



300 pages for an inventory book. A few 
days before commencing stocktaking, begin 
to arrange your goods compactly ; get all 
lines together and goods of a kind placed so 
as but one entry will need to be made for an 
article. If in a general store, take first the 
lines carried for every day. I would suggest 
to enter first, groceries, then dry goods, boots 
and shoes, hardware and crockery in their 
order. Let cost govern you as to price for 
the article inventoried, unless there has been 
an advance or decline, in which case put the 
price at that at which it sells for in the mar- 
ket. I have known parties to go on year 
after year inventorying an article at original 
cost, which has depreciated 50 per cent since 
the time of purchase. Never do this. An 
inflated inventory is of no service whatever 
in determining your actual worth. Go thro- 
ugh the entire stock in a careful manner and 
be careful in your extensions and footings. 
After finishing this, on the following page 
take an itemized account of your fixtures, 
scales, desk, measures, safe, tools, etc. If it 
is the first inventory, put the prices at what 
they are worth. After the first year, I should 
deduct 10 per cent, annually for depreciation 



Due for mdse 

Notes payable... 

Interest due, 

Kent to date 



CANADIAN EXPERIMENTAL DAIRY 
FARMS. 

A meeting of members of the provision 
trade was held on Wednesday, at the Home 
and Foreign Pioduce Exchange, Limited, 
Hibernia Chambers, London Bridge, to hear 
an address trom Professor Robertson, Dairy 
Commissioner to the Dominion of Canada, 
on the work of the experimental dairy farms 
which are under the control of the Canadian 
Government. Professor Robertson said that 
in Canada a system of experimental farms, 
with headquarters at Ottawa, wasestab'i-hed 
a few years ago. The primary object of 
those farms was to investigate the varieties 
of grain which were best adapted to different 
soils, climate conditions, and methods of cul- 
tivation. Some experimental dairy stations 
had also been established in each of the 
provinces east of Manitoba. Their products 
were shipped to English markets in order to 
gain information from close market contact 
how to meet the preferences and prejudices 
of British merchants and consumers, through 
whom they were eno>eavoring to help farmers 
by showing them how to seek the market, 
how to suit it, and how to keep it for their 
own goods. After stating that British farm- 
ers had least cause to fear the competition of 
Canadian food products, he assured British 
consumers that they might rely upon the 
wholesome character of all such products 
which came from the Dominion. — Manches- 
ter Grocers' Review. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



ASSOCIATION ITEMS. 

A committee of the St. Louis Retail Gro- 
cers' Association have gone to the State ca- 
pital for the purpose ot having introduced a 
bill for the modication of the garnishment 
and exemption laws of Missouri. 

Tbe Retail Grocers' Association, of Bos- 
ton, numbers a membership approximating 
one thousand, and at the recent annual 
meeting the Trustees reported upwards ot 
$17,000 in their hands. 

With the view of more closely uniting the 
retail and jobbing interests, the Retail Gro- 
cers' Association of Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan, recently resolved that wholesalers be 
invited to address that body. 

The Central Association of Retail Mer- 
chants, of New York and vicinity, which 
claims to represent a membership of three 
thousand g roars, has addressed a circular 
''to the growers, receners and dealers in 
berries throughout the Unittd States," noti- 
fying them that "the grocers will, from this 
time forward, refuse to buy berries which are 
not contained in non-returnable packages," 
and offering the following reasons among 
many others, which go to prove that sound 
business policy demands the use of the non- 
reiurnable package : "They will cheapen 
freights by more than one-half, because pre- 
sent charges include free carriage of emp- 
ties ; they will always present the fruit in 
clean and eightly packages, and this means 
uniform higher prices ; they will widen the 
existing market for berries and create new 
ones ; prevent gluts, and keep up prices to a 
profitable level, and will be more healthful, 
because of the lessening of the dangers of 
contagion." 

The Retail Merchants' Association of the 
State of New Jersey held a convention on 
Wednesday last. Each auxiliary association 
sends three delegates, with one additional 
for every fifty members. Statistics of pro- 
gress are submitted. 

The retail grocers of New York city are 
preparing to build a large storehouse, where 
groceries bought in bulk can be stored and 
purchased in any quantity desired by the 
members of the Retail Grocers' Union at 
first prices. " This plan has worked well in 
Philadelphia, Baltimore and in other cities 
much smaller than New York," said Presi- 
dent H. I. Dreyer to a World reporter "and 
there is no reason why it should not work 
even better in New York. The Retail 
Grocers' Union will take hold of the matter 
as soon as the new officers have peen in- 
stalled in January, and I have no doubt that 
the scheme will be in successful operation 
by spring. We may not build a storehouse 
at first, but will rent a large building in a 
central location. The scheme will result in 
the saving of hundreds of dollars every year 
to the retail grocers." Plans have been ac- 
cepted by the union for a new hall and office 
building and work has already begun on the 



foundation for it. The corner-stone will be 
laid about January 15, and the building will 
be completed next May. It will be a hand- 
some stone structure of five stories, and 
stand at Nos. 138 and 140 East Fifty-seventh 
street. The union will occupy one floor as 
a hall and another for offices and a parlor. 
The remainder ot the building will be 
rented. 

At a meeting ofthe Chicago Retail Gro- 
cers' Association, January 4, a subject 
brought up for discussion was as to what 
methods had best be adopted for the purpose 
of collecting the outstanding dues from de- 
linquent members. It was finally decided 
to instruct the financial secretary to place 
the amounts in the hat ds of some reliable 
party lor collection on a percentage, said 
percentage being left to the discretion of the 
secretary with full power to name a rate 
which in his judgment would be just and 
reasonable to both the association and the 
collector. 

A new development in the Ohio adulter- 
ated Lod prosecutions is to the effect that the 
wholesale grocers of the state will hereafter 
boycott any manufacturer who will not guar- 
antee his goods to be pure or who will not 
stand responsible for all costs of successful 
prosecution for the sale of adulterated food 
by innoceut retailers. 

The Grocers Union, of San Francisco de- 
cided to give no Christmas presents to their 
customers, but to take up a subscription 
among the charitable ones and devote the 
same to some institution. The amount col- 
lected in this manner was $68 50. 

About a month ago the retail Grocers' as- 
sociation at Columbus, O., concluded to make 
a trial of co-operative buying 



PRESENT BUSINESS METHODS. 

" Friendship doesn't sell many goods 
now-a-days, "remarked a salesman recent- 
ly. This is true enough in one sense, 
but in another friendship plays just as 
great a part in commercial affairs as it 
ever did. That friendship that tied a mer- 
chant up to a particular house, or to a 
certain salesman in that house, and made 
him blind and deaf to any other concern, 
has largely passed away, but there still 
exist many instances of warm personal 
consideration between merchants and 
salesmen, founded on mutual esteem, and 
on benefits given and received in the 
course of business, that will secure trade 
for certain houses, other things being 
equal. A merchant will usually prefer to 
buy of a salesman whom he knows, In 
whom he has confidence, and with whom 
he is in sympathy, but he expects just as 
good treatment from him as from his 
rivals ; In fact, this friendship is usually 
founded on the idea that the merchant 
can do a little better in one way or an- 
other with his particular house or sales- 
man than with any other.- 

This change in the business methods of 
the country is due in part to its trans- 
formation from a new and thinly settl- 
ed country to one in which the most ad- 
vanced commercial ideas alone can rule, 
and partly to changes in the industrial 
Interests of the entire country. In the 



early days anybody could make money 
retailing goods. Style was but little 
thought of. A merchant's stock was 
good until it was sold. The city and the 
surrounding country was being settled 
rapidly, money was plenty, and price 
was not of such great importance when 
everyone had money and felt certain that 
they would shortly be wealthy. 

Now what is the state of affairs ? There 
are more goods for sale than people must 
or can buy. Buyers have been taught to 
be cautious and critical, and economy Is 
practiced of necessity by nine-tenths of 
the people. Competition hence becomes 
severe, and a merchant to be successful 
must be both wise and diligent In his 
purchasings, and cannot afford to over- 
look the advantages which may be found 
by searching through an entire market. 
He must post himself on what is offered 
him by all the houses, and if one can 
make better prices on any line of goods 
he must avail himself of the opportun- 
ity. Not only is his competitor likely to 
do so, but his customers are much better 
posted on prices than formerly through 
the catalogues now so freely distributed 
by the large city stores. His best friend 
in business is that one which will make 
him the lowest prices, or in some way 
enable him to make the most money. So 
that selling goods is not a matter of 
friendship nowadays, but is strictly busi- 
ness, as it ought to be.— Ex. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

Tea brokers here have received frequent 
enquiries for best Japan tea April and 
May pick, and some large sales have 
been made at 27c. to 31c. on western 
account. 

Letters to sugar brokers here state 
that there is a tremendous amount of 
speculative buying of raw sugar in Java 
and the Philippine Islands for next June 
and July shipment, in the expectation 
of an advance in prices based on the 
short supply of cane products. 

Cables on currants from Greece to 
Montreal importers report an easier mar- 
ket at 14s. 3d. to 148. 6d. cost aaick 
freight New York. 

Mr. Chouillon reports business to be 
picking up with him, and credits choco- 
lat meniers with a lot of sales. 

Their annual jollification did not pre-^ 
vent the employees of Lightbound, Ral- 
ston & Co. from attending to business 
this week, and Japan tea and molasses 
ought to be a purchase now if the ten- 
dency of both markets count for any- 
thing, and the firm have a good stock 
of both. 

Chaput, Fils & Co. have some fine lines 
of raisins and currants on hand— sul- 
tanas, provincials, etc. 

If you have a sweet tooth, the Sher- 
brooke Maple Product Co., .of Sherbrooke, 
can furnish you with the native product 
and just what you want. 

Some of the more sanguine traders 
place the stock of molasses in Montreal 
at less than 1,000 puncheons against 1,- 
800 to 2,000 at the same time last year. 

Cod fish is a remarkably firm article 
on the market here, and Munn's special 
lines of it came in for considerable atten- 
tion. 

Chocolate and cocoa are more or less 
of a luxury, but they are a ncie thing 
for the breakfast table. Mr. Hughes says 
that Bendorp's is doing well, and Walter 
Baker & Co.'s goods are not behind the 
procession. _,' \ j ^^^ JJJj 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



11 



We were pleased .... 
to note last weeks . . . 
Advertisement had its . 
effect — let it continue — 
You will always find . 
us willing to meet your 
views 



LUCAS, 



We are open to buy 
^:| Dried Apples. Write 
us if you have any to 
sell. 



STEELE 



73 )JMab 
Street jjortl? 3 
Hamilton 



BRISTOL 



A steadily increasing 
Trade is the best evidence 
that our Standard Lines of 



T 



Mallawalla . . . 

Dalukola 

Imperial Gongou 

and 

Russian Gongou 



7iX 

W. H. ClLLARD * (0., 



Wholesale 
Tea Agents 
for Canada 



m m ^IVE entire satisfaction. Retail 
^i Merchants have told us that 
their Black Tea Trade has steadily in- 
creased since keeping: one or more of 
these lines. They retail at 45 to 50 cte 
and show a splendid profit. If you are 
desirous of working up a fine Tea 
Trade try a sample package. To pur- 
chasers of these Teas we give a novel 
and most effective method of placing 
|t before consumers. If our travellers 
do not reach your district drop us a 
card for particulars. 

Hamilton, orif. 



James Turner & Co., 



HAMILTON 



Splend [< 
Prices in 




| Ruby Prunes Silver Prunes Silver Plums | 

| White Nectorines Purple Nectorines I 

Bartlett Pears Eagle Pears 

Jumbo Peaches Lima Beans Eagle Peaches § 

Royal Apricots Eagle Apricots 

Crystal Apricots, extra fine, On sacks) § 

m m 

9, 




a 



/V\0/NS00PT 



PURE INDIAN TEA. Always relia 
ble, never changes. In cases of 60 
1 lb. caddies, or 120 halves. 



WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED NUMEROUS LINES OF INDIAN AND CEYLON TEAS, 

IN CHESTS AND HALF CHESTS. 

STAISTIDAIRID BLZEILTIDIEID teas. 

OUR BLENDING DEPARTMENT IS NOW OPEN, UNIFORMITY CAN BE RELIED ON. WE HAVE THE 
FIRST CHOICE OF THE MARKET AND THE BEST ESTATES AT OUR DISPOSAL, AND GUARANTEE EXCEL- 
LENT VALUE. WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 



STEEL, HAYTER&CO. 



11 AND 13 FRONT ST. EAST 



Growers' and Importers, Toronto, 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE CARELESS CLERK. 

There are some employes in stores who, 
though not really dishonest, are equally 
dangerous to merchants. 

Though they will not actually steal, still 
they are as criminal as the thiet. The losses 
incurred through the carelessness of employ- 
ees often escape notice, for it is a species of 
viciousness, the result of which is not always 
apparent. Yet the merchant suffers, all the 
same. Perhaps we are wrong in deeming 
this trait vicious. At worst it is but a de- 
plorable weakness of character, often not 
latent, but acquired by an unwise training. 
For the possession ot this drawback in char- 
acter, people invariably have to lay the blame 
with those on whom their early training de- 
pended. The boy who learns h.s early les- 
sons from the man who conducts his busi- 
ness in a slip-shod or haphazard manner 
cannot help possessing a disregard for order 
in hislatter years. Habits are easily acquired, 
but it is woefully hard to rid oneself of them 
especially if they are bad habits. 

The clerk who is careless in even the most 
trivial things never will be successful. Busi- 
ness, like life, is a series of incidents ; on the 
attendance to earh item depends the success 
of the whole. The man who shirks, disre- 
gards or ignores trifles will be unsuccessful 
in the main, for great things are but an ag- 
gregation of little things. — Ex. 

THE GROCERS' AT HOME. 

The committees in charge of the pre- 
parations for the annual At Home of the 
Toronto Retail Grocers' Association, to 
be held at Webb's on Wednesday evening 
next, have completed their arrangements 
for that event, which promises to be the 
most brilliant and successful one yet giv- 
en by the Association. The enthusiasm of 
the whole trade is enlisted even more 
than It was last year. This was to be 
expected, since the popularity of the At 




TO YOU it is 

PROFITABLE and a 

QUICK SELLER. 

Thousands testily to its PURITY and 

Wonderful washing qualities in 

HARD or SOFT WATER. 



Home has asserted itself more strongly 
each year. This year's At Home gets 
the benefit of the hard work done by 
former committees. 

The attendance has enlarged by a sub- 
stantial movement each year, and re- 
strictions have had to be placed on the 
sale of the tickets in order that the trade 
may first be accommodated. This year 
the tickets have been in strong demand. 
The following are the committees in 
charge : 
Refreshment— J. G. Gibson, A. White. 
Printing— R. Mills, J. G. Gibson, A. G. 
Booth. 

Orchestra— A. E. Saunders, J. Doyle, A. 
Sinclair. 

Talent— A. G. Booth, F. S. Roberts, A. 
Sinclair, D. W. Clark, R. M. Corrie, A. E. 
Saunders. 
Treasurer— R. Mills. 
To call on wholesale houses— J. G. Gib- 
son, R. Mills. 

As usual the first part of the At Home 
will be a concert. The following is the 
programme along which it will be or- 
dered : 

C. Dimmock. 

Song "My All" ... J. Hayden Wand. 

C. A. Smiley. 

Beading Selected. 

T. A. Baker. 
Song... Comic. ... Author of Ta ra ra Boom-de-ay. 

H. Simpson. 
Ventriloquism. 

C. Dimmock. 

Song "Friends" Fred. Lohr. 

O. A. Smiley. 

Beading 8electod. 

T. A. Baker. 

Song "He Never Split the Wood." 

H. S.mpson. 
Ventriloquism. 

Mrs. i has Savage — Accompanist. 

This programme is short, but it is said 
to be diverting enough to last all night. 
The ball programme is as long and vari- 
ed as any one could wish, and the menu 
is a splendid one. 

All who attend the At Home may come 
prepared to enjoy themselves. Double 
tickets are $1.75, and 60 cents is charg- 
ed for extra ladies' tickets. Tickets may 
be purchased at the door. 



TRY IT. 



ROYAL SOAP CO.. 

Winnipeg, Man. 



THE INVENTORY. 

" No, sir !" said a Minneapolis business 
man who is well informed on the local gro- 
cery trade, " I don't believe there are over 
25 out of the 375 grocers in this city who 
take stock even once a year." Is it possible 
that this is the fact ? And if the fact, isn't 
it surprising there are not more failures in 
the retail grocery trade every year than there 
are ? No merchant knows anything as to 
where he stands, or what the condition of 
his business is if he does not make an in- 
ventory at least once a year. He may think 
he can tell the state of his stock to within 
$50 or $100, but if he made a complete in- 
voice, he probably would awaken to some 
serious surprises. — Northwest trade. 

Retail dealers in other cities than Min- 
neapolis are inclined to shirk work which is 



really necessary to the successful manage- 
ment of a business, and therefore we would 
not be surprised to hear that the annual in- 
ventory is taken by but a moderate percent- 
age of the retail trade of the country. As re- 
gards the importance of the inventory we 
have spoken in earlier issues, and can con- 
sistently endorse all that our Minneapolis 
cotemporary says upon that head. Not only 
is the inventory necessary to determine the 
annual or semi-annual profits of a business, 
but the future of the dealer may depend upon 
its revelations. A stock may appear large 
and valuable, but owing to a deterioration in 
value through a fall in market prices or by 
shop-wear, it may be much less valuable 
than the owner supposes. It may also have 
run down very low on the more salable 
sizes or kinds, and need sorting up very 
badly. Yet all the while the dealer may be 
deluding himself with the notion that his 
stock represents a considerable portion of 
his business assets. He cannot tell until he 
takes stock whether he really has In his store 
goods which have been paid for and have 
not been sold. Several years ago a jobbing 
house in this city took an inventory at the 
beginning ot the year, and discovered a seri- 
ous discrepancy between the value of the 
stock on hand in the sugar department and 
the account of sales of the article during the 
previous six months. The conclusion im- 
mediately arrived at was decidedly unfavor- 
able to the reputation for honesty of certain 
employes. Detectives were put at work, and 
in a few days stealings involving many 
thousands of dollars were unearthed. Truck 
loads of sugar for which bills had been ren- 
dered and paid, on the receiving clerk's re- 
ceipts, had been shipped to the firm by the 
refineries, but never reached their destina- 
tion. The jobbing firm finally recovered 
every cent of which they had been defrauded 
in this manner, the total amount being suffi- 
cient to pay for the trouble and expense of 
many annual stock takings. 

Putting aside all other considerations, the 
mere fact that an inventory enables the mer- 
chant to take steps toward the prompt dis- 
posal of slow selling goods, which have al- 
ready depreciated in value and promise to 
still more rapidly depreciate the longer they 
are kept, by revealing their perhaps unsus- 
pected existence in the stock, should be a 
sufficient inducement to the dealer to take 
account of stock, however laborious and 
troublesome the work may prove. As re- 
gards the difficulty of the task, it should be 
remembered that only a few hours' timp is 
required and at a season of the year when 
trade usually experiences a temporary lull. 
Take stock, by all means take stock, is our 
advice to all our readers.— Merchants, Re- 
view. 

Ove Lange, general grocer and commis- 
sion merchant, Upper Water street Halifax, 
has admitted Charles R. Reynolds as a part- 
ner in his business, and the firm will be 
known as Lange & Reynolds. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



Fruits of the Season. 



:srow insr stoee. 



Grenoble, Marbot and French Walnuts, 

Sicily Filberts, 

Tarragona Almonds, 

Cases Vostizza Currants, 

Half Cases Vostizza Currants, 

Cases Patras Currants, 

H illewee Dates, 

Eleme and Natural Figs, 

Fancy Seven Crown Figs, 

Arguimbans Off-Stalk and 
quality 



California Evaporated Apricots, 
Good Average Sultanas, 
Choice Sultanas, 
Loose Muscatels, 
Imperial Cabinets, 
Connoisseur Clusters, 
Ex. Dessert Clusters, 
Royal Buckingham Clusters, 
Four Crown Layer Valencias, 
very 6ne. 



H.P.Eckardt&Co. 

Wholesale Grocers, 

TORONTO. 



FOOD 

FOR 

BABIES. 



& 



CHAR 



*£s 



^* EET f*f, 



EVAPORATED CREAM 



STEBILIZED. 

Pronounced by Physicians to be 

Free 
From 

DISEASE GERMS. 

DELAFIELD, ITOVERN & CO., 

91 Hudson St., Sole Agents. 

NEW YORK. 

33 River Street, 

CHICAGO. 

215 California St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

For sale in Canada by 

AMES TURNER & CO 

Hamilton, Ont. 



HUDON, HEBERT <£ CIL. 



Wholesale Grocers 

AND 

Wine Importers, 



304, 306 St. Paul St., 

143, 145 Commissioners St. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 



Now in stock and ready to quote 

2003 boxes Sultana Raisins. 

200 barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

200 half barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

New Nuts of all kinds 

Fine Off Stalk Valencia Raisins, different brands. 

A few boxes NEW MALAGA Fruit left. 



L. CHAPUT, FILS & CIE. 



Wholesale Grocers, Montreal, 



S 



YKUPS - 



We have a splendid Assortment at 
Bottom Prices 



See our Travellers or write us for Samples 
and Quotations before buying 



GAVERHILL, ROSE, HUGHES & CO., » 



MONTREAL 



MAY TEAS. 

We have still a fairly large stock of 

FIRST CROP JAPANS 

And would advise our friends to buy NOW as the visible supply of these Teas 

is nearly exhausted. 

REGAN, WHITE Sc CO., 

1, 3 and 5 St. Helen St., MONTREAL. 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




[This department is made tip largely of items 
from travellers and retailers throughout the 
Dominion. It contains much interesting informa- 
tion regarding the movements of those in the 
trade. The editor will thank contributors to 
nuiU copy to reach the head office Tuesday.] 



T. M. Henderson, has started a general 
store at Ethal, Ont. 

T. C ister & Co., general storekeepers, Port 
Stanley, have assigned to C. B. Armstrong. 

Griffin & Co., general storekeepers, Ridge- 
town, Ont., have assigned to John Lennox, 
of Hamilton. 

H. A. Seed, a prominent Winnipeg fruit 
merchant, died on Friday in California, where 
he had gone for his health. 

Matchett & Co., general merchants, Elora, 
Ont., lost all their stock in a fire which de- 
stroyed the block in which their store was. 

It is calculated that Ireland sends to Eng- 
land every year about forty thousand tons of 
eggs. This means in close figures six hun- 
dred and forty million eggs. 

James F. Copland, retail grocer on King 
street east,Toronto,is in financial difficulties. 
His liabilities are $10,000 and his assets 
nominally $11,000. The principal creditors 
are W. Ryan, Christie, Brown & Co., and 
Eby, Blain & Co. 

A. S. Harrison's grocery and confectionery 
store at Norwood, Ont., was destroyed by 
fire last week. Mr. Harrison's stock was in- 
sured for $1,550, and was a total loss. The 
exact amount of Mr. Harrison's loss is not 
known. The fire is supposed to have origi- 
nated from a defective flue. 

J. E. Hutton, Thornbury, Ont., was in the 
city this week making purchases for his gen- 
eral store. He is one of the most successful 
of the young men in business in northern 
Ontario. 

The Christmas number of The Canadian 
Grocer was a beauty and no mistake. Its 
handsome cover inclosed 48 pages of fine 
letter press and elegant illustrations ; while 
the reading matter was fully up to the stan- 
dard so long maintained. Judging from the 
. display of advertising carried, The Grocer 
is enjoying the prosperity it deserves. — De- 
troit Herald of Commerce. 

The other morning between 5 and 6 o'clock 
Edward Clay, oldest son of W. P. Clay, gro- 
cer, Gait, Ont, got up and lighting the lamp 
for the purpose of warming a drink for the 
baby, he placed a tin cup on the top of the 
glass, which forced the flame down into the 
lamp. He made an effort to get down stairs 
to throw the lamp out of doors, but it explo- 
ded while he was on the stairs, and, being in 



his night shirt, he was very severely burnt 
from the head down. With the assistance of 
his wife and brother-in-law, who stops with 
them, the flames were put out as soon as pos- 
sible. Drs. Sylvester and Warlaw were sent 
for and found Mr. Clay in a very critical con- 
dition. 

Now that the great banquet is over the 
members of the Toronto Board of Trade are 
beginning to talk of the approaching elec- 
tions. These will take place on the 26th 
inst, nominations being made a week earlier. 
Many names are canvassed in connection 
with the several offices, but at present no 
very definite prophecies ate ventured upon 
as to the outcome of the balloting. 

The GrandTrunk railway Co. have issued a 
circular stating that an allowance of five cents 
per barrel off current winter tariff on flour 
will be granted mil'ers who desire to forward 
flour to Montreal now.to be stored there pen- 
ding the opening of navigation and export. 
The flour will be filled at tariff and the above- 
mentioned allowance made on proof of ex- 
portation. Shippers or consignees will be 
required to pay Montreal terminals and sto- 
rage charges. 

J. M. Gordon, general merchant and grain 
buyer, Beaverton, Ont., met with an accident 
a few days ago by which he lost his left arm 
below the elbow. While the morning train 
was taking water he engaged in conversation 
and placed his hand on the side of the car. 
A sudden movement of the train caused him 
to fall, and in the effort to recover his feet 
the left arm passed beneath the car wheel, 
being crushed into a pulp. Amputation was 
necessary. 

The West Peterboro' Farmers' institute 
held a meeting in Peterboro' on Saturday. 
D. E. Smith, B.A., of Brampton, spoke on 
"Road-making." proposing changes in the 
present system. The meeting was unani- 
mous in the opinion that there should be a 
change in road making. None desired a 
commissioner and about one third favored 
the employment of a trained engineer to sup- 
perintend roads. A committee was appoint- 
ed to interview the county council with a 
view to having the act respecting wide tires 
on heavy waggons imperative in that county. 

The success which attended the shipment 
of turkeys from Canada last year resulted in 
preparations being made for the coming sea- 
son on a wider scale. A consignment was 
landed at Liverpool yesterday from the S. S. 
City of New York of sixty tons, or about 
12,000 turkeys, and they have proved to be 
in fine condition. An agency has been 
opened in London, and part of the present 
shipment was sent here yesterday. The re- 
mainder will be distributed over Lancashire, 
Yorkshire and the Midland counties. Fur- 
ther shipments are expected on the 18th and 
2 1 st inst. — National Provisioned 

The Minneapolis grocers had an "experi- 
ence meeting" recently, after the regular 
order of business. Some interesting opin- 



ions were given on the question, "What is 
the greatest evil or abuse in the grocery 
business ?" Among other things the follow- 
ing were considered great evils : For a cus- 
tomer to order a can of oil, make the grocer 
go several blocks for the can and then de- 
liver the oil ; ordering a two cent postage 
stamp and having it charged on the pass 
book ; customers dictating too freely, and 
allowing them to measure goods bought ; 
lack of unanimity among grocers j delivering 
a yeast cake two miles ; the pass-book sys- 
tem (duplicate slips of sales' accounts were 
recommended); too long hours, and the uni- 
versal credit system. 



AFTER HOLIDAY REFLECTIONS. 

Now that the holidays have come and gone 
the trade can take time to figure out the gains 
and losses of the past year. There is no bet- 
ter time for stock taking than now, when the 
rush of business has slackened and stock has 
been reduced by the demands of the past 
busy season. 

I believe that a great many grocers do not 
take a very careful account of stock at any 
time, because it is a long and tiresome task, 
and because to the man who carefully watch- 
es every detail of his business and owes no 
man money that he cannot easily pay, it 
seems a little unnecessary labor. 

Those who are hanging on the outeredge 
do not care very much, and, perhaps don't 
want to know the facts too intimately. 

In either case, however, the task should 
not be looked upon either as a burden or as 
an unnecessary one. 

It should not be a burden, and is not un- 
necessary. 

To begin with, nothing will show the leaks 
in a business, nor the accumulation of bad 
stock, or the fungus growth of unhealthy ac- 
counts, like a strict stock taking. It will not 
be denied that these things are most neces- 
sary things to look after. 

There are some men who can tell from day 
to day just how they stand on these matters, 
and these men always perform as well an 
annual inspection. It is needless tr say that 





es ! Hon es ! 



Ale, Wine, and Spirit 
Bottles. 



For Sale 



By 



Blaiklock Rrds. 



17 Common St., 
Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



J. F. EBY. 



Our Salesmen 

awiiiiwnniiiiiiniiiiiiiinn^ 




^AVE gone on the Road with 
the largest and best selected 
assortment of samples of 
Teas ever offered to the 
trade in Canada. Do not 
fail to see them ; they are extra 
value and what is as good, 
The Prices are Right. 



15 



HUGH BLAIN. 



7/V 



BLAIN 
& CO., 



WH0LEJ/1LE QROCERJ 



Toronto 
Ont. 



they, as a rule, get out of their business all 
that it will give. 

But the other, and by far the greater num- 
ber, do not begin to get out of theirs what 
they should get. How many times, for in- 
stance, do they use bad words when they 
find goods, salable goods, stowed away out 
of sight, and reported as " all out" by a 
clerk ? Ot course, the latter is blamed for 
this, and he, no doubt, deserves a share of 
the blame, but what of the proprietor, who 
waxes so wroth and becomes so fierce over 
what he should have made impossible by 
using proper methods ? 

Some time ago I heard of a grocer who 
had occasion to remove his place of busi- 
ness, and who, in moving, found boxes of 
soap and boxes of canned goods and other 
articles, which had been laid away for 
months and of which he knew' nothing. 
It was told in rather a spirit ot boasting 
that the find was a great discovery. I am 
sure that no sensible business man would or 
ought to boast of such careless methods as 
were here exposed. 

The practice of stock-taking, however, is 
becoming more general as its merits are be- 
coming more understood. Competition has 
become so keen that slip-shod methods do 
not avail as they once did. Long credits 
are not as easily given as they were once, 
and in consequence of both reasons, over- 



stocking is much less common than it was 
some years ago. 

Stock-taking cannot be too highly urged 
upon all retailers, though it should not be 
necessary to urge it, because its benefits are 
so great and patent. Men go along easily 
and jauntily on their business ^areer, taking 
for granted that their affairs are as they 
would like them to be. Some day trouble 
comes and they find ii difficult to meet some 
bills. When forced to investigate, they find 
that by neglect in looking over stock that 
they have bought too much of goods which 
have not a ready sale. The bills that are 
due and pressing are for these, and ihey then 
readily see, what care would have shown 
them before, that by buying carelessly they 
had cieaied obligations which should not 
have been contracted. Every dealer has 
been confronted with trouble ; some only 
once, while others repeat their troubles be- 
cause they never heed the lesson. 

Now is the time to account to yourself for 
your stock. 

Such grocers' stocks as 1 have seen dur- 
ing the past holiday season show a great in- 
crease in variety over those of former years. 
More and more of the trade are out in the 
hunt for all the trade of their own customers 
that they can get. The belief has gained 
ground that the great staples can take care 
of themselves, and more attention has been 
given to fancy goods than ever before. 

Still, to me, it seems that a great discre- 
tion must be exercised in selecting the vari- 
ety which goes to make up the new lines of 



goods. Many grocers tell the tale that their 
customers do not buy and » ill not appreciate 
most of the (ancy goods, because of the lan- 
cy prices which are attached to them. It is 
a mistake to suppose that the grocers them- 
selves get any fair po.rt of the lancy price, 
because the goods cost them so much that 
to sell them at all they must be satisfied with 
less than an average profit. This statement 
will be verified, I think, by the statement of 
any grocer having experience in this line of 
goods. The fact is that the packers of goods 
in glass and some other packages should be 
satisfied with a smaller profit than they at 
present demand, before there can be any 
great extension of the sale ot their goods. 
Now they apparently cater to that fortunate, 
but extremely limited, class of consumers 
who have no care at all as to price. 

The fact is that grocers are reaching out 
to get some of the money which their 
patrons reserve from November payments to 
use for Christmas purchases. They are 
moving in the right direction, and I believe 
have met with the ready co-operation of 
their customers. To instance this, I will 
state that I can name agrocerwho put candy 
in his stock for the Christmas tiade and 
who sold nearlya ton by the pound ! Hetold 
me that he made more money on this /sale 
than he had on sugar for the past five years, 
and 1 can easily believe him. 

This, therefore, is an article that every 
grocer should have in stock; should instruct 
his clerks to talk up. 

I hear of a grocer in a large city west of 
Albany, who, amongst other rules, foroids 
any clerk to urge sugar on any one under 
penalty of discharge. Wise man ? — Harlem 
in National Grocer. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




B. T. Co. 



If you 

do not know 

what the above 

stands for 

you are not 

posted. 



Send for Price List or 
Sample Caddies. 



EMPIRE 

TOBACCO 

CO. 

MONTREAL. 



DRY GOODS. 

There are times when the wholesale 
houses relapse into almost hibernating 
quietness. The past week has seen very 
few buyers in the city, and the conse- 
quence Is that trade seems very quiet. 
Nevertheless, one is soon undeceived, 
when the shipping department is visit- 
ed. Large quantities of goods are going 
out, and larger quantities are coming in. 
Cases, large and small, are tumbled in 
and out, showing that in time of peace 
dry goods men prepare for war. 

Letter orders are fairly numerous, and 
travellers' orders are coming in slowly, 
but as large as could be expected. 

The weather has been very favorable to 
retailers during the past three weeks. All 
over Ontario, and, in fact, throughout 
the whole of Canada, the weather has 
been fairly severe, accompanied by a 
small amount of snow, but still sufficient 
to afford good sleighing. This has quick- 
ened the movement of grain and produce, 
and also the movement of heavy winter 
goods. When the retailers unload their 
winter goods wall they are always in 
better spirits for spring buying, and 
many dealerswillnot buy spring goods 
till the middle of January. 

Alexander & Anderson are in receipt of 
their shipments of spring prints in do- 
mestic and imported. They claim that 
the variety shown is fully up to that 
shown by the average dry goods house, 
and includes the newest designs on the 
market. Domestic and imported flannel- 
ettes are coming to hand, and the range 
shown at present is very extensive. 

Gordon, Mackay & Co., have secured 
one thousand pieces of combination suit- 
ings. These plaid goods are much used 
by ladies for dresses, morning wrappers, 
skirts, etc., and are rapidly becoming 
popular. They are selling these goods at 
2 1-4 cents less than the regular price. 
This of course is due to the large quan- 
tity taken by the house, the entire stock 
of the manufacturer having been secured. 
The patterns are twenty in number, and 
were never shown before this season. In 
their furnishing department their 
" Crest" brand of white dress shirts is al- 
ways kept in full stock. This line is be- 
coming celebrated with the trade for 
style, fit and wear, and is carried in all 
prices. In parasols their stock is now 
complete in all lines. The feature of this 
stock is a choice assortment ofr handles 
in natural, ebony, celluloid, sterling sil- 
ver mounted, and other lines. The pre- 
vailing color in fancy parasols is car- 
dinal. 

Caldecott, Burton & Spence are bus- 
ily engaged cutting their spring dress 
tweeds. The demand for these domestic 
goods has been quite equal to former sea- 
sons. These goods will probably hold 
for another season. They are moving out 
their spring lines of hosiery, underwear 
and topshirts. Staples are in good active 
demand in the house at present. Prints, 
flannelettes, shirtings, cottonades, dress 
linings, ginghams, and teazel cloths are 
moving lively. 

W. R. Brock & Co. are showing a long 
range of art muslins, for curtains and 
draperies, in all the leading colorings 
and designs. These goods can be retailed 
all the way from 7 to 25 cents a yard 
The prices are low, although repeats can 
only be secured at an advanced 2Jricc, due 
to the higher price of raw cotton. A 
shipment of frillings, veilings and com- 
plexion nets In the newest uhuden has 



just been passed into stock. A case of In- 
fants' bibs has just been opened up. 
These goods are new in design and pat- 
tern. Two special lines of unlaundrled 
shirts that can be retailed at 50 and 75 
cents are being offered. Extraordinary 
circumstances allowed the purchase of 
these lines at a price which makes them 
it is claimed, better value than has ever 
been shown before. Their sale is very 
rapid in lots of ten to twenty-five dozen. 

Johu Macdonald & Co., have just re- 
ceived a large shipment of mottled car- 
pets. This line was bought at a special 
low price, and will be sold to the retail 
trade at 20 cents per yard, %vhich is con- 
siderably lower than any carpet hitherto 
offered. Moreover, American quotations 
on this line of carpet show an advance 
this week of 2 1-2 cente per yard, and it 
is hardly likely that the line will be du- 
plicated. In their linen department they 
are doing a huge trade in ginghams, 
napkins, towellings, hessians, etc. The 
strong demand for these goods has ne- 
cessitated the forwarding of repeat or- 
ders. In the haberdashery department 
they have just opened a shipment of 
seam bindings, bone casings, satin otto- 
mons and linen beltings. These are 
new goods in this market, and can be 
obtained from this house only. Seven 
cases of Austrian pearl buttons have 
been opened up. All sizes are kept In a 
bewildering variety of design. They have 
now in stock a full line of their cele- 
brated " Sphinx" linen thread, manufac- 
tured by Wm. Barbour & Sons, Lisbon 
Island. Ireland. In belts they are show- 
ing a long range of new styles for spring 
in fancies, selfs, and club colors. The 
widths are from 2 to 3 inches, the 2 1-2 
and 3 inch widths being In favor. 

John Macdonald & Co. are showing a 
new line of 20 inch tartan surah in tar- 
tans Macdonald, clan Alpine, Ferguson, 
McLaughlin, Mackinnon, Robertson, Mac- 
farlune, Royal Stewart, Campbell, 
Breadalbane, Macintosh, and the Vic- 
toria. These are the newest thing in the 
silk market to-day, and ladies are using 
them for blouses and dress trimmings. 
The effect is very handsome. They have 
also received a shipment of Swiss mus- 
lin and cambric embroideries and inser- 
tions ; widths run from one-half to 40 
inches. They are being sold at special 
job prices. A new range of 14-inch com- 
plexion nets is also to hand ; these are 
popular goods at present. There is a big 
demand for satin checked apron muslins, 
and this house carries a large stock. 
They are shown in checks from the pin 
check to the largest sized basket plaid. 



J. McCabe, grocer, E'ora, Ont., lost his 
stock in a fire which destroyed the building 
in which he carried on business. His stock 
was insured. 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

It contains neither Ammonia, Alum, or 
any other injurious ingredients. 

It is the lightest and fluffiest of all pow- 
ders. 

^PRICE'S 

U<_jPowder. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



John Jamieson & Co's 
LOCHFYNE 

HERRINGS 

56-60 E. Howard Street, GLASGOW. 
Agent, W. S. KENNEDY, 
463 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 

DRESSED 
POULTRY 



We are now booking orders for shipment 
on or about December the fourth next, to 
points in British Columbia, delivery in time 
for Xmas trade. Poultry will be thoroughly 
frozen and packed in either close or open 
cases, weighing two hundred pounds each. 
We offer special prices on large lots. 



WINNIPEG, 



ECO,, 

MANITOBA. 



W. F. BUCHANAN, 

BROKER, COMMISSION MERCHANT 

AMD 

GENERAL PURCHASING AGENT, 
•W mSTIETIIB E Gk 

REPRESENTING: 

ARMOUR & Co., Chicago, 111. 

THE ARMOUR PACKING CO., Kansas City. Mo. 

THE B C. SUGAR REFINING CO., Ltd.,' Van- 
couver, B. C. 

BUCHANAN & CO., Saltcoats, N. W. T. 

HIRAM WALKER & SONS, Ltd., Walkerville, 
Ont. 

JOHN DEWAR & SONS, Tullymet Distillery, 
Perth, N. B. 

PERINEf ET FILS, Reims. 



Warehouses on C. P. R. Track. 

Excise, Customs and Free, 

and Low Rates Storage. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

3SI OTICE. 

Ik British Columbia Fruit Canning and 
Coffee Co'j, Lt'd, 

VANCOUVER. B.C. 

Having largely increased their capacity. We ad- 
vise all dealers to see their price list before plac- 
ing their ordeis for Jams, Jellies, Canned Fruits, 
and Canned Vegetables. 

Besides their regular brands of Ground Coffee, 
now so favorably Known they quote : 
Blend No. 1 at 35c, either ground orwhole roasted 
" 2 at 33c, " " " 

" 3 at 30c, " 

Their Flavoring Extracts are of the choicest 
quality. 

EPPS'S COCOA 

}i lb. packets, 14 lb. boxes secured in tin 
Special Agent for the Dominion ; 

C. E. Colson, Montreal 



LAURENCE GIBB 

Provision Merchant, 

83 COLBORNE STREET, - TORONTO 

All kinds of Hog Products handled. Also Butter 
Cheese, Poultry, Tallow, Etc. 

PATENT EGG CARRIERS SUPPLIED. 
Good Prices paid for Good Dairy Butter. 

Meglaughlin, Marshall & Co., 

Wholesale Provision Merchants, 
3 and 4 Corn Exchange, 

A1 t Manchester, 

Also at ' 

Liverpool and Glasgow. P nO*lfl JT\C\ 

Are prepared to receive Consignments of Eggs, 
Bacon, Hams, etc. Having been established more 
than 40 years, they are in connection with all the 
best buyers in the North of England. 

W. GIBBINS &, CO., 

Gommission and 

Manufacturers' Agent, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



We are open for Consignments of Dried 
and Evaporated Apples, Beans, Peas, &c, 
or will take orders for packers and others. 

JAS. DICKSON & CO., 

26 WEST MARKET STREET, 
Provision and Commission Merchants. 

Eggs, Butter, Hams, Lard, Bacon, Cheese, Dried 
Apples, Finnan Haddies, Dried Cod Fish, bought 
or sold on commission. Agents for all lines of 
Canned Corned Beef. Egg Carriers supplied. 

Butter is scarce and in good demand, at 18 to 
21c: Eggs are 22 to 24c. for fresh, and 16c. for 
lined ; There is still a good demand for Poultry, 
Chickens 40 to 60c, Ducks 50 to 90c, Geeie 8 to 10c, 
Turkeys 10 to 12c : Green Apples very dull, at 
1.00 to $2.00 per bbl. ; Dried Apples 4$ to 5c. ; Honey 
plentiful at 8 to 9c. ; Potatoes 85c 

Consignments of above 
Solicited 

J. Y. Young & Co. 
Session, 74 Front St., East 

. . TORONTO . . 

PARK, BLACKWELL & CO. 

(Limited.) 
— SUCCESSORS TO - 

T OBOITT O. 

Full lines ot Superior Cured Hams, Break- 
fast Bacon, New Special Rolls, 
Beef Hams, Long Clear Bacon, 
Butter, Cheese, Lard, Eggs, 
Etc. 
Write for Price List. 



PUT 

TEXAS BALSAM 

I3ST STOCK 

The Great Hea'er for all kinds of wounds on 
Horses and Cattle. $3.00 worth only costs you 
$1.80. Express prepaid. Cash with order. 
C. F. SEGS WORTH, 
6 Wellington St. East, 
Sample 26c. postpaid. Toronto. 

S. K. MOVER, 

Commission Merchant 

And dealer in foreign and 

domestic fruits, fish, 

poultry, etc. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Oysters, Oyster Carriers, 
Smoked, Salt and Fresh *v 
Fish. Consignments and 
Orders solicited. 

76 Colborne St., 
Toronto, Ont. 

George MoWilliam. Frank Everist. 

MGWlLLIAM & EVERIST 

Fruit and Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 

TORONTO, ONT. 




FIGS, DATES, NUTS, 

ALMERIA GRAPES, Etc., 

Florida Oranges are now arriving in car lots, 
stock fine, also Messina Lemons. Will fill 
all orders at lowest possible price. 

J. Cleghorn & Son, 

94 Yonge St., TORONTO. 



Fancy Florida Oranges- 

Car arriving weekly. 

Car Messina Lemons — 

Just arrived. 



We are handling best brands Bulk and Canned 
Oysters, Haddies— Portland and St. Johns, 
Fancy Bloaters and all kinds Fresh Fish, New 
Golden Dates, Figs, Nuts, etc. 



WILLIAM RYAN, 

PORK PACKER 

Toronto, Ont. 

HAMS, MESS PORK, 

BREAKFAST BACON, SHORT GUT, 

ROLLS, LARD. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



McLAREN'S 



Is Honest Goods and just 

the Thing on Which to 

make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



— »— -p— 




[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, and as prices are modified by both 
quantity and quality, the quotations given below 
and in our Prices Current necessarily take a wide 
range.] 

TORONTO MARKETS. 

Toronto, Ian. 12, 1893. 

GROCERIES. 

The wholesale trade report 1893 to have 
made a good beginning. They never look 
for much business during the first fortnight 
in January. The last two weeks have been 
no dazzling exception to this rule, but they 
have clearly been better than the correspond- 
ing period of last year. The hard weather 
and fine fall of snow improved the roads and 
gave an earlier movement to farmers' de- 
liveries of grain and started business some- 
what in tht country. The advance in sugar 
had a similar, though less appreciable effect; 
there was a limited movement on the part of 
city retailers to anticipate any further ad- 
vance. The wholesale houses have complet- 
ed their stock-taking but have not yet made 
out the results. This they do know, that 
theybegin theyear with stocks light in every- 
thing that is likely to be in current demand. 
They are all quite or comparatively low in 
sugar, Valencia raisins, currants, tea. In all 
these, the market is in such a shape that 
wholesalers would for the most part prefer 
to be well-stocked. Another general point 
relative to stock-taking is the expectation 
that last year's net results will be rather low. 
Price-cutting played havoc with profits up to 
the month of September. From that for- 
ward till the end of the year there was a 
rather less aggressive competition carried on 
and some money was made. 

COFFEE. 

The market is still very firm. The price 
of Brazil coffee has hardened since last re- 
port. A local house that had bought an in- 
voice last week tried to duplicate it this week, 
but was unable to do so unless at an advance 
of %c. The price of Rio coffee is firm from 
20c. upwards. In Java coffee the market is 
likewise very firm at a recent advance. The 
price is firm 28c. upwards, but very finest 
Old Government Java would now cost the 
importer 40c. 

DRIED FRUIT. 
There is some life still left in the dried fruit 
trade. The stock of Valencia off-stalk raisins 
is very light, some houses being bare of sup- 
plies. The lowest quotation for good fruit 
is l%c. Prices on a lower basis relate to a 
much lower rate of quality than that usually 
acceptable to consumers. Valencia layers 
in very small compass, and the demand does 
not revive since Christmas. The price is 7c. 
upwards. Of blue fruit there is enough left 
for the holders to compensate themselves for 



ths cutting they did before the close of the 
old yea-'s trade. On the remnant of the 
better classes of this fruit there is a firmer 
feeling, but London layers do not quote 
materially higher, $225 to $2.60 being the 
range. Currants are not in strong request, 
but as they are not plentiful the price is 
unchanged, being firmer indeed in some 
lines. There is a line heard of that can be 
got below 6^c, but the bulk of the trade 
hold that figure as their inside price. Barrels 
are quoted by some holders at 6c. Good 
Patras currants are quite scarce. A consid- 
erable quantity of stock, sold some time ago 
to arrive this month, is now on the way, and 
it may affect present prices. There are 
scarcely any cases to be had on the street. 
Cases are 6d. higher in Patras. Prunes are 
considered very good stock now, being in 
small volume and in very fair demand. U's 
are 7 l Ac, B's 2>%c. Fancy figs are abont 
cleared out. Bags are 4K to 5>£c. Wal- 
nuts, which usually are easy at this time of 
year, are very firmly quoted by shippers. 
This market is doing little in nuts of any 
kind. The range for walnuts is 10 to 15c. 
according to quality. 

RICE AND SPICES. 

The market for rice is steady and un- 
changed. The price is 4 %c. upwards. Spices 
have not undergone any marked change. 
In cloves and pepper an increased firmness 
is noted, both coming a little higher to buy- 
ers in the foreign market. Cloves are now 
quoted at 15 to 26c. The firmness is attri- 
buted to speculative efforts in London to 
corner the market. Black pepper is 12 to 
15c. 

SUGAR. 

A problem on which there are a good 
many heads now engaged is the future price 
of sugar. The present state of the market 
warrants the view that the price will not be 
lower before March. The statistical position 
appears to support the theory that there will 
be a further advance. There does not ap- 
pear to be a sufficiently strong and wide- 
spread conviction that this latter view is 
correct to lead to any heavy buying move- 
ment on the part of either wholesalers or re- 
tailers. The wholesalers would have bought 
liberally before the advance if they could 
have got future delivery, but their offers since 
the advance are not said to be very numer- 
ous. Speculation in sugar has never brought 
much money to any house that has tried it. 
Either the market takes a reverse, or the 
necessity or policy of making a cut have 
usually caused such ventures to turn out dis- 
appointing. There is therefore not so much 
keenness to take risks this year as there was 
last. Granulated is steady at 4%'c, and yel- 
low quotes from 3^c. Sugar stocks are 
light in wholesale hands, and that circum- 
stance will impel buying. 

Willett & Gray, New York, in their Statis- 
tical say of sugar : The week — Raws and re- 
fined unchanged. Net cash quotations : Mus- 
covados, 3c : centrifugals, 37-16C: granu- 
lated, 4 60c. Total stock in all the principal 
countries by latest uneven dates is 1,220,039 
tons, against 1,046,863 tons at the same un- 
even dates last year : Havana and Mantan- 
zas stock 3,000 tons, against 20,000 tons last 
year. Raws — This has been rather a holi- 
day week, and transactions in the local mar- 
kets have been quite insignificant, but a con- 
siderable business is reported from Cuba, 
including 70,000 bags centrifugals, at rather 
above the parity of our local quotations, 
which are unchanged from last week. The 
tendency of the opening year is in favor of 
sellers although liberal offerings from the 



new Cuba crop are commencing to be made, 
which maycheck the tendencyto an advance. 
Refined — After a quiet ending of the old 
year, buyers appear disposed to take on lar- 
ger stocks for the new year's- business, and 
an active and strong market is to be noted 
with the opening year. Prices, however, re- 
main unchanged for the week, except for 
grades of softs, and there are no indications 
of any general change for the present. Quo- 
tations will no doubt follow the course of the 
raw markets quite closely this year, and 
many circumstances are likely to occur to 
influence the market. 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

Syrups are selling quietly at from 1 % to 
3c. New Orleans molasses is quoted 30 to 
50c. according to quality. West Indian is 
3° to 35c. 

TEAS. 

Purchasers are not coming forward so 
freely with their orders as might be expect- 
ed, the low rate of retail stocks and the scar- 
city of the best selling grades being consid- 
ered. A lively movement is one of the early 
certainties, however. The wholesalers are 
now giving attention to stocks, and tasting is 
now very generally observable in the sample 
rooms. Japans quote from 15c. up, Congous 
from 14c, Young Hysons from 18c, Indian 
and Ceylon from 14c. 



MARKET NOTES. 

[Importers, wholesale merchants and manufac- 
turers should send any items intended for this 
department so that they may reach the head 
office not later than Wednesday morning. The 
editor will always welcome such information.] 

Davidson & Hay now control the sale of 
T. D. Millar's Paragon cheese. 

Clemes Bros, have received a carload of 
cocoanuts direct from Jamaica. 

Labrador herring and fish of all kinds are 
now stocked by T. Kinnear & Co. 

Warren Bros. & Boomer have received a 
shipment of fine Rio coffee, ex s. s. Capua. 

Sloan & Crowther are offering some special 
bargains in gallon tomatoes, packed in cases 
of 6 tins each. 

The perusal of W. H. Giilard & Co's. ad- 
vertisement should interest merchants who 
desire to extend their tea trade. 

Clemes Bros., have received a consign- 
ment of maple syrup, just in from the East- 
ern townships, that they claim to be extra 
fine. It comes in ten lbs. tins. 

T. Kinnear & Co. are offering case prunes, 
first-class in quality, at reasonable prices. 
They have also some old prunes in hogs- 
heads that they can sell at ^H to 5c. 

Merchants should write W. H. Giilard & 
Co., Hamilton, for particulars of their ad- 
vertised Standard Teas. An increased sale 
or better profits is invariably the result to 
buyers. 

Davidson & Hay have a large stock of 
James Morand's Valencia raisins on hand. 
The firm claim that this fruit is second to 
none, and they are prepared to quote prices 
on a basis favorable to buyers. 

Perkins, I nee & Co. are advised by their 
Rotterdam correspondents that Java coffee 
suitable for the Canadian trade is very 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 



HENDERSON 

& LIDDELL, 

3 Eastchp, London, Eng, 

DEALERS IN 

Sugar, Dried and Green Fruit, 
Rice and Canned Goods 

Are prepared to enter into correspondence 
regarding purchase or consignments oi all 
Canned Goods, Green Fruit, &c. 

H. & L. have been in business over 40 
years and have Travellers all over England. 
Highest References. SP 

The Standard 
of Excellence ! 

Always Reliable, 

Never Vary. 

If your wholesale 
grocer does not 
keep "Kent" Bot- 
tled Pickles, write 
direct to 

THE KENT CANNING & PICKLING GO. 

CHATHAM, ONT. 

THE " Lion Brand " 

is so popular that UNSCRUPULOUS 
packers have adopted it. To prevent the 
public from being imposed on we have in 
addition lithographed the word "BOULTER" 
across the face of each label in a distinctive 
color. Look out for the word "BOULTER" 
if you want first class " canned goods." 

Bay of Quinte 

Canning Factories. 

• PICTON and DEMQRESTVILLE. 

W. BOULTER & SONS, 

PROPRIETORS, 

PICTON, ONT. 




FINNAN- 



HADDIES 



Direct from Packers. 

BEFORE PLACINO YOUR ORDERS GET 
QUOTATIONS FROM 

L. H. DOBBIN, - MONTREAL. 



It always pays to 

BUY THE BEST 

Goods. Fresh Fruits and Vegetables can 
be had every day, by using the Lakeport 
Preserving Co's Canned Goods. All goods 
guaranteed. Try them once and you will 
use no other. 

Lakeport Preserving Co., 

Lakeport, Ont. 

Factories at Lakeport and Trenton. 



" Nothing" succeeds like success." 

The sale of our 

BEAVER BRAND 

PICKLES 

INCREASED 

79 PER CENT. 

DURING THE LAST YEAR. 




Wishing all our Friends a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO, 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 

TORONTO. 



JVIAPLiE PRODUCTS. 

Having large warehouses at Sherbrooke, the centre of the 
largest Maple product territory in the world. We offer to the trade, 
all Maple products of the finest quality, in quantities and packages 
suited to any locality. Special inducements on car lots. 

Address 

Sherbrooke Maple Product Co., 

Sherbrooke, P. Q., Canada. 




DAILEY'S 



Please try them. 
His boys eat them. 

Prepared by the 

Kingsville 
Preserving Co., 

(LIMITED.) 

KINGSVILLE, ONT. 



Boy 

Brand 

Tomatoes 





BUYERS ! 



OUR interests are identi- 
cal. It has paid us to pack 
a superior quality of Canned 
Goods. It will pay you to 
sell them. Our sales for 
1892 have doubled 1891. 
You may double yours by securing now, while the 
price is right and stock fresh and complete, a full 
assortment of our leading lines. 

All of which is guaranteed strictly Al. 

Delhi Fruit ^2 Vegetable Canning Co., 

FACTORIES : Delhi, Out,, and limn on the Lake, 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MARKETS — Continued 

scarce. Yellows in small parcels he reports 
as changing hands at a price equal to 40c. 

Eby, Blain & Co. are offering fine fresh- 
water herrings, heads off or on, iD kegs. As 
only a limited quantity of these fish are put 
up this season, intending buyers should avail 
themselves of this opportunity to purchase. 

Very fine and delicious California Loose 
Muscatel raisins in bags and barrels are 
being offered by Eby, Blain & Co. This 
fruit is very fine,and is particularly delicious 
as cooking raisins. The price is low and 
consequently they are free sellers. 

The clam, unlike the oyster, is not only a 
delicious article of food, but its juice or broth 
is said to possess wonderful medicinal prop- 
erties, cures dyspepsia and all forms of dis- 
ordered stomach. Burnham's Clam Bouillon 
is anoutgrowthof this discovery. Afood that 
tickles your palate and fits your stomach 
well is certainly something to be desired. 

Yesterday the American ship Cora, com- 
manded by captain Ray, was cleared for New 
York by Harrall & Elmer with a cargo of 
5,300 bbls. of molasses and 1,131 bbls. of 
rice. The cargo was consigned to N. W. 
Tausssig & Co., of New York, and the ship- 
ment of molasses was said to be the largest 
single shipment to leave New Orleans. — New 
Orleans Picayune. 

The Sanitary Soap is a new line that the 
Pure Gold Mfg. Co. are putting on the mar- 
ket. It is likely to be received with a strong 
demand, as such a line is in much stronger 
request since health precautions and health 
inspection have been given such an impetus 
by the cholera and by the fear that it may 
reach this continent this year. 

J. A Hawkesworth furnishes the fol- 
lowing Valencia raisin statement, crop 
1892 : Stock on hand November 30, 100,000 
boxes ; received during December, 123,000 
boxes ; stock on hand December 31, 110,000 
boxes; distribution during December, 113,- 
000 boxes. Valencia raisins on the way, by 
steamer direct, 20,000 boxes. 

Messrs. E. Lazenby and Son, the well- 
known pickle manufacturers of London, on 
Saturday week held their sixth annual dinner 
in the Whitehall Rooms of the Hotel Metro- 
pole. In accordanca with the custom of the 
firm all the representatives and staff were in- 
vitad, and an exceedingly pleasant time was 
spent. Mr. W. Lazenby occupied the chair, 
and Mr. C. Lazenby the vice-chair — Man- 
chester Grocers' Review. 

A trial shipment of a few carloads of 
canned vegetables is now on its way to Eng- 
land from this market. If the experiment 
proves a success this line of export trade 
will undoubtedly be followed up. The cir- 
cumstances are favorable to success. The 
cost of the goods is low in this country and 
comparatively high in the United States. 
Hence the competition of the United States 
pack will not be so hard to face in the Eng- 



lish market as it would be if these conditions 
were the reverse of what they are. Any con- 
siderable relief through an export outlet 
would improve domestic prices. 

A decision was rendered on December 
28th by Judge Carpenter of the U. S. Circuit 
Court, district of Mass., in the case of O. & 
W. Thum v. John A. Andrews & Co., in fav- 
or of the complainants. This has been a long 
drawn out and hotly contested suit, every 
point involved was fully discussed and con- 
sidered, and in every point were the com- 
plainants sustained. The decision firmly 
establishes O. & W. Thum Co's rights to the 
sealing border and other features of their 
Tanglefoot Sticky Fly paper. The success 
of Tanglefoot is the result of much time, lab- 
or, and money spent in perfecting and intro- 
ducing it, and the O. & W. Thum Co. 
naturally feel that they are entitled to the 
benefits of their patents. The decision of 
this suit is of special importance and interest, 
as it will enable them to suppress several 
other close imitations of Tanglefoot and in- 
fringements of their patents. 

PETROLEUM. 

The market is featureless, with the basis 
continuing at 14 to 14/^c, the price of 
Canadian refined. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

The play of butter prices from day to day 
is within a small limit. The deliveries of 
one day may be better than another and a 
temporary but trifling relaxation is notice- 
able, but there is never a greater drop than 
a cent, seldom that, and prices always re- 
cover, because the demand is keen and con- 
stant, whereas the supply is on the short side 
and operates rather fitfully. Good dairy tub 
butter is in request, the capacity of the de- 
mand being much above the resources of the 
supply. In default of offerings of butter of 
this description, buyer s have of course to take 
something else, and the market for lower 
grades of tub butter is therefore ltkewise 
supported by a good demand. So that all 
dairy tub is good property, and is scarce. 
Choice is quoted at 15 to 20c, lower grades 
are 15c. up, and are readily taken by bakers 
when they get to the minimum point of value. 
Large rolls are not over-plentiful either. 
Good roll butter is worth 17c. Indifferent 
stock is worth 14c, with the range between 
these prices scaled for variations in inter- 
mediate quality. 

Cheese is very firm at II to lij£c. for fall 
makes. Earlier makes are 10^ to lie 
COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Tiie price of No. 1 hand-picked 
stock is $1.35. There is some common 
stock held at Si. 15. 

Dried Apples — Buyers are open to take 
all that come at 4^'c, but higher prices are 
hard to get. 

Evaporated Apples — Some purchases 
have been made of round lots at 7%c. out- 
side ; 7 %c. has also been paid outside. 
Jobbing parcels are 7}4c. 

Eggs — Fiesheggs are now quite a rarity 
and are worth 25c. There is no need to 
couple the condition " in small lots," because 
large lots are not to be had at all. Cold 
stock are worth 18 to 19c, and limed eggs 
are 16 to i6j£c. 

Honey — Extracted honey is 7 to 10c. and 
is finding little sale. Comb honey is 13 to 
1 6c. 



Hops— The price at which the little busi- 
ness that is done is 18 to 20c. for 1890 stock. 
Choice hops of the former year's crop are 15 
to 1 6c. 

ONIONS — In this cold weather there is 
scarcely any trade in onions, which remain 
at $2.50. 

Potatoes — Cars are taken at 75c, but 
sellers are few. The cold weather gives a 
check to business. Out of store lots are 85 
to 90c. 

Dressed Poultry— The offerings have 
fallen away very much. Chickens are 35 to 
50c. per pair, ducks 60 to 80c. per pair, geese 
7c. per lb., turkeys ioj^c. per lb. 

HOGS AND PROVISIONS. 

The market for dressed hogs, though it 
had reached an almost unprecedented point 
last week, did not stop there. Packers take 
all suitable offerings at $825, and this price 
has been paid both for spot stock and to ar- 
rive. Higher prices are also spoken of, and 
some purchases are reported to have been 
made at an advance on $8.25. The packers 
are not all so fastidious as they used to be in 
the matter of select weights. Hogs are now 
so scarce that the heavy weights and light 
(Continued on page 22.) 



CANNED GOODS. 

TORONTO. 

The market for canned goods continues to 
be favorable to juyers. The prices realized 
may not go so low down as they did. %2%c. 
being now the inside price, but this rather 
means that the lowest grade goods do not 
sell well and so are not freely offered by the 
jobbers. The range is from 82j£c. to $1. 
Packers do not give the market a chance to 
turn in their favor, their efforts to sell having 
a steadily depressing effect. Their goods 
are going rapidly into consumption, but the 
responsibility of carrying them is put on 
the producers, neither jobbers nor retailers 
being anxious to assume any share of the 
risk. The low price and the now established 
place of canned goods among the foods of 
the country cause the consumption to be very 
large, but the traders only stock themselves 
in a hand-to-mouth way. Salmon is quiet 
from $1.45. All other descriptions of can- 
ned goods are at a standstill. A few cars of 
vegetables have been forwarded for sale on 
the English market, but nothing can be said 
yet of the result of the trial. 
MONTREAL. 

The movement in canned goods is small 
and the market without feature. What little 
business there is, is at very small margins. 



n^^ Choice Natural 
In bags 
about 55 lbs. 



s 



10 lb. boxes 

Choice Eleme 

4 Row 



4k 

10k 



..(LEMES Bros.. 



Phono. 1766 



Toronto 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



2L 



TORONTO, - - Dec. 30, '92. 

we-PAYING- are 



4 



3 

4f.o. 



FOR I ""F r.w.B. 

BRIGHT--DRY--SOUND 

NEW CROP 

DRIED APPLES. 



we BUYING are 

N EW 

DRIED APPLES- 



ADDRESS 

STANWAY & BAYLEY, 

42 FRONT ST., EAST, TORONTO. 



-TERMS- 

PRICE— Good for one week from 
date, for not exceeding 10 Bar- 
rels from any one shipper. Lar- 
ger lots subject to confirmation 
before shipment. All others can 
be made without advice, but 
subject terms stated. 

SICHT DRAFT-Or local pay-or- 
ders honoured, 10 days afver 
shipment made. 

QUALITY-Bright, dry, and sound, 
new -crop stock. 




Daniel G. Trench & Co., 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

CANNING FACTORY OUTFITTERS. 

GENERAL AOEKT8 FOR 

SPRACUE MFC. CO., FARNHAM, N. Y 
CANNING MACHINERY OF all kinds. 




THEY ARE RIGHT. 

We have packed all kinds of Vegetables, Fruits, 
etc , and our CANNED GOODS are in the hands 
of the wholesalers. 

Our Factory New Throughout. 

The Strathroy Canning and Pre- 
serving Co., Ltd., 

STRATHROY, - ONT. 



Todhunter, Mitchell & Co., 

DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 

HIGH GRADE COFFEES, 

Old Government Java, Arabian Mocha, Plantation Ceylon, Maracaibo 

and Santos. 

Grocers draw trade by selling their FAVORITE EXCELSIOR BLEND. 
RELIABLE ROASTING BY PATENTED PROCESS. TORONTO- 



English 
Malt 

Six GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

GILLARD'S Specialties 

High Class, English Made, 

ZLSTIE^aT"" Pickles and "ZLSTIE^W"" Sance. 



CL 



GILLARD&CO., w ™ L * 



Vholesale Grocers in the Dominion. 



"J ersey B rand" C ondensed Milk. 

It is guaranteed Pure and Unskimmed, 

An excellent food for Infants. 

We make only the one quality — THE BEST T 

Buy only the JERSEY BRAND for all pur 

poses. Sold by Grocers, Outfitters and others. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FORREST CANNING CO'Y, 

HALIFAX, N.S. 
STANWAY & BAYLEY, Agents, Toronto. 





W. A. Carson. 



R. B. Morden. 



J. Anning. 



BELLEYILLE CANNING CO. 



-PACKERS OF THE- 



"Queen Brand" 

Fruits and Vegetables. 

All our goods are packed with the greatest care and clean- 
liness, and as we are on the market to stay we will only 
put out 

FIRST-CLASS GOODS. 

We respectfully ask the trade to recom- 
mend this brand to their customers; 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MARKETS— Continued 

weights are not all allowed to go to the 
butchers. Products are remarkably firm at 
advanced figures. 

Bacon — Long clear nc. Smoked backs 
are i2>£ to 13c, bellies 13XC, rolls 10c. 

Hams— Are 13c. 

Lard— Pure Canadian is ii^c. in tubs, 
and 12c. in pails. Compound is to to ioj^c. 

Barrel Pcrk— U. S. heavy mess is $20 
to $21. Canadian short cut is $21.50 to 
$22. 

Dressed Meats — Beef feres are 5 to 6c. 
hindquarters 7 to 8^c, veal b}i to 8c, mut- 
ton bYt to 7c, lamb 7c. to 8>£c 
GREEN FRUIT. 

Cold weather makes trade in green fruit 
rather slow. The market is sufficiently 
stocked for all requirements. Boxes of Ja- 
maica oranges are $2.7$ to $3. There are 
no barrels. Floridas are $3 to $3 50. Tan- 
gerines are $2.75, Mandarines $3.25. Va- 
lencias are $4.25 to $4 50. Grape fruit is 
$4.50 per hundred. Lemons are $2.75 to 
$3.50 as to quality. Bananas are $1.50 to 
$2 and are scarce. Malaga grapes are about 
done at $7 to $8. Cranberries are $10 per 
barrel. North Shore stock is 75 to 90c. per 
basket. Pineapples are 20 to 30c. Cocoa- 
nuts are 5% to 6c. Apples are $1.50 to $2.50. 
FISH AND OYSTERS. 

Whitefish and salmon trout are unchanged 
and quiet at 7c, while 7J^c. is the price of 
Manitoba white fish specially. Lake herring 
are scarce at $2 to $2.50. Sea herring is 
5c, steak cod is 6yi to 7c, market cod 4Kc. 
skinned and boned codfish, 6>^c, Labrador 
herring $6, shore nerring $5 to $5.50, Digby 
herring 11 to I2^c, boneless fish is 4c, 
boneless cod 7 to 8c, oysters $1.25. 



MONTREAL MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 12, 1893. 

[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other fircum- 
stances, and as prices are modified by both quan- 
tity and quality, the quotations given below, and 
in our Prices Current, necessarily take a wide 
range.] 

GROCERIES. 
There has been more sp : rit shown by the 
grocery market during the week, which is 
due to various causes. The principal cause 
is the manifest anxiety about supplies of 
leading staples, such as tea and sugar, which 
has led to a rather active movement of both 
from first hands. Jobbers have been hold- 
ing off all along on these in the hope of 
better terms, but it has not done them any 
good, in fact, the reverse, for the chances 
were that they could have booked orders for 
supplies at better terms before the holidays 
than they can now, as the natural conditions 
at primary markets and the statistical posi- 
tion favors higher prices if anything. In 
consqeuence of this, both sugar and tea are 
firmly held and the indications point to 
higher prices if anything. The advance in 
sugar of an Y%c. has quickened the demand 
for the staple and both refiners and jobbers 
report a freer demand, while the raw pro- 
duct continues to show a remarkably firm 
front. Teas and coffees have experienced 
considerable activity and the latter is re- 
markably firm, with a stiffening tendency in 
values. Chicory is also scarce and wanted. 



Syrups and molasses have been quiet but 
firm, especially the latter, stocks of which in 
Montreal are placed at one half what they 
were at the same time last year. Holders 
manifest considerable independence, there- 
fore, and talk higher prices. With regard 
to payments, traders' generally anticipate 
slow returns during and just after the holi- 
days, and this is the case at present. 
SUGARS. 
There is a very fair trade passing in re- 
fined sugars, the demand being of a general 
character plainly evidencing that stocks in 
grocers hands are small. The advance of 
an yic by the refiners has not checked the 
demand and there is talk of another raise in 
consequence of the remarkably firm position 
of the raw sugar market. We quote refiners 
prices as follows : Granulated 4#jc and 
yellows y/z to 4c 

SYRUPS. 

Ther« is not much doing in syrups but the 
market holds steady at \% to 2#c A small 
movement is reported in Barbadoes molas- 
ses at 32 '^c in round lots. This price how- 
ever could not be repeated now for jobbers 
are asking 34 to 35c. 

TEAS. 

There has been a fair trade doing in teas, 
as buyers are evidently beginning to under- 
stand that holding off for lower prices is not 
going to bring them about. There is con- 
siderable enquiry for cheap Japans, prices 
of which are moving upward. Good to me- 
dium and fine grades also have shown a 
freer movement, some 1000 packages in all 
having been moved during the week. 
COFFEES. 

There has been more enquiry for coffee, 
not from actual consumers but from jobbers, 
who, in this as in other lines, show more 
anxiety about securing stock for future 
wants, and we note some sales of good 
round lots in consequence. Mocha has left 
first hands at 25c in round lots, while Ja- 
maica has changed hands at \%%c. for ordi- 
nary grades. There is no really fine stock 
to be. had, but bids for 20c have been re- 
ceived. Asking prices in round lots of other 
kinds are Maracaibo, 22 to 23c; Rio, 20 to 
21c; Java, 2b% to 29c, -and Mocha, 27 to 
3°c. 

SPICES. 

Despite advices from New York citing 
weakness, spices are firm here, and although 
we note no sales it would certainly take 
7 'Ac. to move a round lot of black pepper. 
There is no change in cloves or nutmegs. 
RICE. 

The rice market does not show any change, 
business being quiet and quotations un- 
changed at the following standard $3 85 ; 
choice $4.25 ; higher grades $5 to $7, 

DRIED FRUIT. 
Dried fruit has not furnished any special 
activity during the week, but despite the free 
offerings of cheap stock really prime fruit 
cannot be had under 5c net cash in round 
lots, but no sales of importance have trans- 
pired during the week. A lot of good ordi- 
nary seconds have come forward during the 
w«iek and is offered on the market at 
4 - J^c, thirty days, in round lots. As to the 
cheap poor stock it is very difficult to quote 
for it is simply selling for what holders can 
get and that is not much but it is more than 
likely that a bid of 4c. would be readily ac- 
cepted by some holders. Valencia layers 
are firm a' 6 to 6#c in round lots. There 
is no perceptable change in currants which 



are quoted steady at 5 % to 5^c in straight 
round wholesale lots. For lobbing quanti- 
ties with the exception of the inferior Valen- 
cia stock a buyer would have to pay a pro- 
portionate advance on the above figures. 
NUTS. 
Business in nuts is quiet and prices are 
unchanged. We quote the following : — 
Pecans 1 itoi2Xc,Terragona almondsi6j£c, 
Grenoble walnuts 13% to I4^c.,filberts 10 to 
ioj^c, Ivica i4^c, Brazil 15c, marbots 
i2^c, cocoa nuts $3.50 to $4.50 per bag of 
100 for old, new $5 to $5.50. 

FRUIT. 

Business is quiet in oranges the usual lull 
after the holiday rush. In small jobbing 
quantities we quote Fancy Floridas $325 to 
$3.50 Valencias $4 00 to $4.25 Messinas $2.- 
50 to $2 75 Ja.-.acia in barrels $5 to $6. 

There is even a small demand for lemons 
and we quote Missinas $2,00 to $3 50 accord- 
ing to goods. 

Grapes are quiet and unchanged as fol- 
lows Almeria in kegs $7 to $8 Concords 3^c 
to 4c. 

There is a fair demand for dates at 5 % to 
6c in boxes. 

FISH. 

The demand for fish is good and dealers 
report an unusually active business. Sales 
to arrive of No. 1 Halifax green cod have 
been made at $5.75, while spot transactions 
have transpired at $5 50. We quote : Had- 
dock 4:., cod 3 to 3^c, steak cod 4^ to 5c, 
lake trout 7c, white fish 7 to 7^c, pickerel 
or dore 8c; dried cod, $5 50; No. 1 green 
cod, $550; B. C. salmon, $13 per brl. ; La- 
brador salmon, $13 to $14; No. 2 mackerel, 
$14 per brl.; do. $7 per half brl.; Labrador 
herring, $5 25 to $5.50 per brl.; C.B. and N. 
S. herring, $5.25 per brl.; tommy cods, $2 to 
$2.2f per brl.; fresh herring, $1.85 per hun- 
dred. 

APPLES. 

There is no material change in apples but 
stocks are ample and with a rather dull 
market, holders in the West are offering at 
lower prices. Car lots of good winter varie- 
ties can be had at $2.25. 

POTATOES. 

Supplies of potatoes are decreasing here 
and the feeling is firmer in consequence. 
Car lots of good to choice having been 
placed with buyers here during the week at 
90 to 95c, which is an advance of 10c. 

HOPS. 

The hop market is quiet and good East- 
ern Townships, 1892 stock, has been offered 
here at 18 to 19c, a round lot fetching \Z l /tC. 
the other day. Yearlings are slow of sale at 
14 to 1 6c. and old stock very dull at 5 to 9c. 
HONEY, 

There is no change in honey, combs sell- 
ing at 13 to 14c for choice, with 9 to 1 ic for 
darker stock as to quality. Extracted is 
quoted at 6>£ to 8c 

BEANS. 

The market is steady, with sales of choice 
hand packed at $1.35 to $1.40 per bushel, 
and $1.15 to $1.20 for ordinary. 
ASHES. 

The movement in ashes is slow and the 
market dull and featureless. We quote first 
pots $4.25, seconds $3.50 to $3.55, first pearls 
$5.15 to $5.20. 

DRESSED POULTRY 

There has heen a fair demand for fine dry 
picked turkeys at nj£ to 12c per lb. and 
common stock 10 to ioj£c in lots and good 
dry picked chickens command Z)4. to oc, 
geese 8 to 8>£c and ducks 9 to 10c in lots. 
DRESSED HOGS. 

The market is somewhat excited and 
higher purchases by Montreal buyers hav- 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



23 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

TORONTO. 

The improvement in the wheat market 
has caused a movement among millers to 
secure a higher range of values for flour, 
milkrs claiming that the price of raw mater- 
ial is too high (or them to continue selling 
at fo.-mer prices. Both bran and shorts are 
firmer. 

Floor.— City millers' and dealers' prices 
are: Manitoba patents, $4.60; strong bakers' 
$4.25 ; white wheat patents, $4.50 ; straight 
roller, $3 .40; low grades, per bag, $1.25 to 
$1.50. 

Car prices are : Toronto freights— Mani- 
toba patents, $4.30 to$4-40 ; Manitoba 
strong bakers' $3.75 to $4.90; Ontario 
patents, $3.25 to $3.50 ; straight roller, $3.15 
to $3.30 ; extra, $2.60 tc $2.70; low grades, 
per bag, $1.00 to $1.25. 

Meal — Oatmeal is $3.80. Cornmeal is 
S3.S0. 

Feed — Bran is Si 1.50 to $12, shorts $12.50 
to $13 mixed feed $22, feeding corn 57 to 
58c, oats 29 to lie. 

Hay— Baled timothy is $9. 

Straw — Is steady at $5. 50 to $6. 

MONTREAL. 
There has been some improvement to 
flour during the week, an export demand be- 
ing to note, while the local call is widening 
to larger dimensions. Winter wheat $4.25 
to $4.50; spring patent, $4.25 to $4.50*; 
straight rollers $3.55 10 $3.75, extra $3.20 to 
$3.25 ; superfine $2.65 to 2.90; city strong 
bakers' $4.10 to 0.00 ; strong bakers $4.00 
to $4.10. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



Advertisements for assistants in retail and 
wholesale houses, under this head, free. 

SALESMAN WANTED- A GOOD GROCERY 
hand ; one who is acquainted with general 
trade ; must be sober and well recommended ; 
no other need apply. Address C. Moore, Orillia. 

WANTED-BY NOV. 1ST-ENERGETIC, Ex- 
perienced salesman for g< neral store ; well 
up in dry goods ; not afraid of work ; state 
salary; must have Al references. Address Rox 
342, Woodstock, Ont. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



Advertisements inserted under this heading 
one cent per word each insertion. 

WANTED— 1,C00,0<>0 LBS. EVAPORATED AND 
sun dried apples, for which highest cash 
prices will be paid, delivered on cars. Special 
arrangements with large dealers. Send samples, 
stating quantity, etc., promptly to Michael Do vie 
& Co.. Exporters and Jobbers. Evaporated and 
Dried Fruits, Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

SITUATION WANTED. 

WANTED SITUATION — BY YOUNG MAN, 
in the wholes-ale grocery and provision 
trade, as an assistant or traveller. Ten years 
experience in London England. Will take 
small wageB to commence. Good references. 
G. W. G. D., Oak Lake, Man. 

YOUNG MAN WITH TEN YEARS EXPERI- 
enoe in grocery lines wishps to secure posi- 
tion in general store in country. Good refer- 
ences. *'. W. B , Canadian Grocer. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters translated from or written in any 
foreign language. 

J. H. CAMERON, 10 Front St. E. 

The Western Milling Company 

(Limited.) 

REGINA, ASSA. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

High Grade Flours, 
Hungarian Patent, 
and Strong Bakers. 

We also handle Hard Wheat Oats, and 
other kinds of feed. 

We would solicit the patronage of the 
Millers' of the Eastern Provinces, wanting 
Manitoba Hard Wheat. All orders en- 
trusted to us will be carefully and promptly 
filled. 



Correspondence Solicited. 

Embro 
Oatmeal 
Mills 

D. £. BOSS, - - EMBRO, ONT. 

A CHOICE QUALITY OF • 

Roller, Standard and Granulated 

Oatmeal 

IN BARRELS , HALF BARR ELS OR BAGS. 

Selected WHITE OATS only used. For prices 
of Oatmeal or Oathulls in Car-loadsor less quan- 
tities, write or wire, and will reply promptly. 
Can ship via Canadian Pacific or Grand Trunk 
Railways. 



OATMEAL 



Dominion Mills. 

LONDON. 

Excelsior Mills. 

MITCHELL. 

Write or wire for Thomson's Brands 

ROLLED OATS, PINHEAD & STANDARD MEALS. 

SPLIT PEAS, POT BARLEY, CORN MEAL, ETC. 

All kinds of Chop and Mill Feed. 

ceKeRal crain Dealer. 

Highest price paid for Oats and Peas in car lots. 

WALTER THOMSON, 



London and 

Mitchell. 



BRANDON ROLLER MILLS. 

Brandon, Man. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hungarian , Patent, Strong- Bakers 



FLOUR 



Also Oatmeal, Rolled Oats, Rolled Oatmea 

Granulated and Standard. 

Dealers in all kinds of grain and feed. 

ALEXANDER, KELLY & COY, 

PROPRIETORS. 

IM.WENGER&BROS., 

AYTON, ONT. 

- - MILLERS - - 

(Hungarian Process) 



BRANDS s 

KLEBER, MAY BL OSSOM. 

AGENTS = 
J. L. SMITH & SON, - Montreal. 
EPHRAIM ERB, - Halifax. 



R. M. PINCOMBE. 



W. W. SUTHERLAND. 



STRATHROY OATMEAL AND CORNMEAL MILLS. 

Pincombe & Sutherland, 

STEATHEOT, OZtTT^IRIO- 

Manufacture by the latest improved process 

The Celebrated White Eagle Brand of Boiled Oatmeal, 
also Standard and Granulated Oatmeal, CORNMEAL, Dessicated Rolled Wheat and 
Wheat Germ, put up in barrels, half barrels and bags. Write or wire us for samples and 
prices. 

N.B.— The only mills putting up Rolled Oatmeal in Cotton Bags. 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MONTREAL MarktU Continued. 

ing been made in the west at $8.20 to $8 25 
laid down here and we now quote $8.25 to 
$8.35 per 100 lbs. 

PROVISIONS. 

In sympathy with the excitement in the 
west we have a much firmer provision mar- 
ket to note and domestic pork is higher than 
a week ago. Lard also is higher than it was 
while the feeling in smoked meats is firm. 
We quote as follows : Canadian short cut, 
per brl. $19 to $20 ; Mess pork, Western, 
new, per brl $19 to $20.00 ; Hams, city 
cured, per brl. 11 to 12c. ; Lard, Canadian, 
in pails io# toio^c. ; Bacon, per lb., n>£ 
to 12c. ; Lard, com, refined, per lb., 9 to 

EGGS. 

There is a good local demand for eggs and 
prices are firm. We quote : Fresh boiling, 
24 to 25c; held fresh, 19 to 20c; local limed, 
17 to 18c; and Western limed, 14 to 15c. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

There has been a rather freer movement 
in creamery butter on export account since 
our last and holders feel somewhat better 
than they did, but prices are unchanged. 
Choice dairy stock is scarce, and there is 
very little Western stock offering heie. 
creamery, 22 to 23c; Townships 20 to 22c; 
Morrisburg andBrockville 18 to 19c; West- 
ern dairy 17 to 18c. 

Cheese has been more active also, some 
8,000 boxes having been moved during the 
week at io|^ to 1 i^c. Stocks here are very 
small, and holders are disposed to ask 
higher prices if anything. 



ST. JOHN, N. B., MARKETS. 

St. John, N. B., Jan. 12, 1893. 

Groceries.— The past week has been like 
ull after a storm, but indications point to 
more active market in most lines. Refiners 
and wholesalers are talking higher prices for 
sugar. The flour market has taken an up- 
ward turn. Beeves fall in line, and to say 
nothing about lard and pork, which is almost 
out of sight and still keep smoving upward. If 
money were a little more plentiful it would 
look like a regular old fashioned boom. 

Molasses. — The talk during the fall that 
molasses was a short crop has proved a fiz- 
zle, as prices are lower to day than for some 
time with a very limited demand. 

Dried fruits. — Higher prices are talked 
of for off-stock of Valencia layer raisins 
present prices are 5^ to 6c and 6% to 7c. 
Prunes 8c. Dates 4^ to 5c. London layers 
$2.25 to $2.40. 

Fish — The market is dull and not much 
prospect for improvement. Large cod are 
quoted $4.1° to $5, medium cod $3.75 to $4; 
pollock $2.15 to $2.35. Pickled herring, 
Shelbourn, $4 to $4.25 per bbl.; half bbls , 
$2.50 to $2.75; shad, $5 to $5.50 lor half 
bbls.; mackerel, half bbls, $4.50 to $5; 
smoked herring, 7 to 9c: finnan haddies, 6c. 
Frozen cod and pollock, 2% to 3#c. 



THREE KINDS OF CUSTOMERS. 

Every retail merchant knows that in 
trade there are three kinds of customers 
to deal with— first, the one who knows 
just what she wants ; the second, the 
one who thinks she knows, and the third 
does not pretend to know. The first is 
generally posted on styles, fashions, 
weave, finish and colorings of the goods 
desired— in a word knows what she 
wants and where to obtain it. This class 
is easily waited upon, and gives the mer- 
chant or salesforce but little trouble. The 
second, who thinks she knows what she 
wants and does not, is the one who is 
the most difficult to sell and please. She 
requires special attention, the exercise 
of patience and good judgement on the 
part of the salesforce. The good sales- 
man understands this, and brings the 
power of his knowledge of human nature 
to the fore to satisfy and to please. This 
is where the skill and tact of the good 
salesman comes in. The third is the un- 
pretentious customer who depends upon 
the experience, taste, judgment and 
knowledge of the merchant and his sales- 
force rather than her own. She is 
frank enough to tell you that her know- 
ledge of goods is limited and that she 
does not get out much. She depends 
upon you to be suited. This affords the 
salesman the opportunity to sell the late 
styles or unsaleable stock in many in- 
stances. If he treats the customer fairly 
he tells what are good sellers, what are 
not selling well, what are the latest 
styles and the most serviceable goods. 
The cuning salesman often overreaches 
the mark by attempting to sell an un- 
saleable article to such a customer. 
This is a mistake, and one that will re- 
act against the merchant. Never deceive. 
If an article is out of style say so ; tell 
the truth and you will sell more goods, 
and satisfy your customers, as well as 
yourself.— Chronicle. 



SYSTEM IN THE STORE. 

A late issue of the Ohio Merchant con- 
tains the following relative to system m the 
store : 

" Webster defines system as 'an assem- 
blage of things adjusted into a regular whole; 
or a whole plan or scheme consisting of a 
chain of mutual dependencies,' etc. 

" The principle of system, in common with 
all principles of action, is found in the 
operations of nature. The man, therefore, 
who lacks • system' is out of line with nature, 
and to be out of line with natural system is 
to be at odds with the world, and his sur- 
roundings. What the rudder is to the boat, 
system is to the business, without which it 
will helplessly drift beyond rescue. It is often 
stated that men of genius are particularly 
noted for being careless in their methods and 
habits of action, but these are not the 
1 geniuses ' who make a success in business 
lines. We honestly believe that if a man 
were possessed of sufficient capital and ex- 
perience, and all other factors of success, 
but was totally lacking in system, he would 
surely make a failure in business. Some of 
the principal matters in which system relates 
to dealers are the buying ot goods, the ar- 



rangement of stock, the division of labor, 
the recording of sales and accounts, and 
the delivery of goods to customers. 
In the matter of buying it is neces- 
sary that the buyer should avail himself of a 
system which will keep him posted as to 
goods needed or soon to be needed, and the 
market prices and relative differences in 
goods. 

"He will therefore keep a record of goods 
asked for but not kept, and new articles 
which are brought to his notice by the trade 
papers or manufacturers' circulars. He will 
also keep a record of current prices and quo- 
tations, and freight and other allowances, to 
enable him when he buys to purchase with 
intelligence in regard to his needs, and with 
discretion in regard to the market. 



THE DRUMMER'S PETITION. 

A hungry drummer out in the wilds of 
Nebraska puts up the following pathetic 
petition, to which many of our eastern tra- 
velers will respond ; " so mote it be 1" 

"Back ward, turn backward oh time in thy flight ! 
Peed nee on mush again just for to-night ; 
I have grown weary of restaurant fakes, 
Petrified sandwiches, vulcanized steaks, 
Oysters that sleep in a watery hath, 
Butter as strong as Goliath of Oath ; 
Weary of paying for what I can't eat, 
Chewing trunk hinges and calling it meat. 

Backward turn backward, for weary I am ! 
Give me a whack at my Grandmother's jam ; 
Let me drink milk that has never been skimmed, 
Let me eat butter whose hair has been trimmed ; 
Let me but once have an old-fashioned pie, 
Thereafter in peace I might curl up and die. 
I have been chewing old scrap iron for years, 
Can you then wonder I'm melting in tears ? " 

—Detroit Herald of Commerce. 



Olive growing, olive picking, and the 
manufacture of olive oil have become a high- 
ly important industry in California. This year 
the industry has a remarkable boom, and the 
dealers are entirely unable to meet all the 
orders they have received. This is especially 
the case in the Pomona Valley. Everybody 
engaged in theolive trade — growing, making 
oil, or acting as brokers — is making unusual 
profit, and there is a demand for five times 
the amount of the crop. One order that 
could not be filled came to Pomona last 
week from a New York grocery house for 
20,000 gallons of pickled olives. Many 
orchardists have made $250 an acre from 
olives this season, and some have made a 
clean profit of $350 an acre. — Commercial 
Engineer. 

Rennie's Illustrated Guide for Amateur 
Gardeners is issued for the whole of 1893, 
its appearance pretty closely coinciding 
with that of this year of grace. It has 
the advantage of a very fine cover, and 
the cover has no cause to be ashamed of 
its contents. The outside of the book/ in 
fact, triumphantly challenges fault-find- 
ing, the variety, richness and harmony 
of its coloring matching well with its 
tastefully conceived design. So bright a 
book might make the disappointed ama- 
teur gardener reconsider his decision not 
to try his 'prentice hand again and re- 
convert him to belief in the simple Joys 
poetically associated with garden labors. 
The Guide has a tempting appearance 
that cannot fail to do good to the hoe 
and rake trade. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



FAMOUS 

" STAR " 

Sugar Cured Meats 

Mild, Sweet, Delicious Flavor. 

All live dealers have them. 

Be sure you have fresh stock 



F. W. FEARMAN, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



ESTABLISHED 1851 



JUST RECEIVED 

4,500 Boxes 

Valencia Raisins 

WRITE FOR OUR PRICES. 



N. QUINTAL & FILS, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

274 St. Paul Street, Montreal. 



BALFOUR & GO., 

IMPORTERS OF TEAS 



-AND- 



WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

HAMILTON. 



WESTERN ONTARIO AGENTS FOR THE 

Irish Mustard. 

Cherry's DUBLIN Mustard is guaranteed ab- 
solutely PURE, and sold cheaper than the com- 
pound. Send for Prices. 



Special Tea 
Sale 



During thjs Ulftontb, lz>e 
tyaVe beci&eb to cut fye 
prices on all our ^eas 
qti6 Will styoW tl?e tra&e 
some splenbib lines at 
from 10 per cent, to 
15 per cent. beloW 
usual prices 



Don' fall to get our Prices 
and Samples 

h W. IANC 4 (0 ? '^iSsaS 



COOKING FIGS. 

In Bags about 50 lbs. each. 
Fine Quality and Cheap. 

Sloan & Crowther 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

19 Front St. E., Toronto. 

ILlCl 

Our shipments now aniving ex S. S. Ar- 
dengorm and Broomhaugh, were purchased 
at the lowest point. 

Layers, very choicest quality. 

Best value in market. 



JOHN BURGESS & SON 



.1 



35 and 37 Front St. East, 

TORONTO, - ONT. 



Who would 



2 




Bay Soup . 

WHETS YOU CAN BUY 

Finest Cider 



At RG cts. Gallon 




Smith and 

Keighley 

9 Front St. E., Toronto. 



TEAS - - 



^ A SPECIALTY 



PERKINS, INCE & Co., 

41-43 Frpnt St. East, 
TORONTO, 



SAUCE 

AND 

PICKLE 



MANUFACTURERS, 

\(\7 OTDAMn Corner of the Savoy 

lUl I II A Pi U Steps, London, W.C 



Vide Sir Walter Scott's "St. 
Ronan's Well," Chaps. XVI. and 

XXX. 
Lord Byron's " Beppo," VIII. 

EDWARD ADAMS 

& CO. 

mporters of Teas 



-AND- 



Wholesale Grocers 

LONDON, ONT. 

SPECIAL BRAND TEA. 

LOOK OUT FOR 

JAPAN TEA 
Nothing equal to it at the price. 
See our travellers. 

Write for samples and prices. 

Thos. KINNEAR & Co 

Wholesale Grocers, 

49 Front Street East, 
TOBOITTO. 

Elliott, Mair& Co., 

Importers of Teas 



-AND- 



Wholesale Grocers. 



LONDON, ONT. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PRICE CUTTING AND A REMEDY. 

When first I mentioned this matter be- 
fore our committee it was received with 
an air of suspicion by most members. Our 
president at once advised us to beware 
of attempting any interference with indi- 
vidual freedom In trade matters, for, he 
said, and I myself believe it, many a 
promising association has gone to its 
ruin in the vain attempt to coerce mem- 
bers into adhering to prices fixed by the 
committee. It is a rock that would shat- 
ter any association. I thought I was 
misunderstood. I did not advocate any 
such measure as the fixing of prices and 
insisting upon our members adopting 
them. I explained my meaning in the col- 
umns of the Grocers' Review, and gave 
many reasons for the adoption of such a 
move as that I advocated. Other writ- 
ers followed me, agreeing with me that 
something of the nature I proposed was 
not only desirable, but had now become 
a necessity in the interests of the whole 
trade. Wholesale, retail, and assistants 
alike, from this correspondence, and more 
still from letters I have received, and 
conversations I have had with many 
grocers and their assistants— I feel quite 
satisfied that some guide to sound 
prices-, showing a fair remunerative 
margin for the defraying of business ex- 
penses, and a reasonable profit for the 
tradesman or employer, would be hailed 
with pleasure by the Manchester Asso- 
ciations. My reason for first mention- 
ing the idea to our committee was the 
strong conviction I had that something 
of the kind would be expected by many of 
our members. Fools are not all dead 
yet, and if conducting a business for the 
benefit of the public, and the eventual 
ruin of a man's business and family, 
entitles him to that unenviable distinc- 
tion, I think the grocery trade may fair- 
ly lay claim to the prize. I will take 
sugar as an instance. We have for some 
time past been selling it at a consider- 
able loss. We go on selling it at 2d. per 
lb., while the co-operative stores calmly 
charge 2 l-2d.. for the same article, and 
get it, except in the case of those mem- 
bers who are cute enough to buy almost 
everything they want there, and, after 
that, head for some private grocers for 
their sugar. These are what may be 
termed bargain hunters. They go round 
scanning shop windows to see who cuts 
prices in one article, and who in another, 
some people using half a dozen trades- 
men in this manner. These bargain hunt- 
ers are quite within their right. Grocers 
themselves are to blame. I don't sup- 
pose there is a single tradesman to-day 
who is not heartily sick of selling crystal 
sugar at 2d., yet for Want of an effort 
at combination to effect a farthing per 
pound rise, we still stick in the mud. 
This is really a crowning folly, and es- 
pecially so nowadays when we are sur- 
rounded with magnificently fitted tea 
shops and butter shops. These 
two articles, which for gener- 
ations have been looked upon as re- 
quisite to compensate a grocer for his 
loss incurred upon the sale of sugar, have 
been in a great measure filched away. 
Therefore it is useless to preach old cus- 
tom when the conditions of trade are al- 
together changed. I know it has been 
customary from the days of olden times 
to sell sugar at first cost, but In the 
days when such a practice was estab- 
lished there were no tea firms who could 
boast of doing a large proportion of 
the tea trade of the country. I was 
amused, when discussing this ques- 
tion the other day, at a grocer 
who remarked that not one grocer in 



fifty could do a simple multiplication 
sum. He said that if a grocer only real- 
ized 2 1-2 per cent, discount he could 
at the same time clear and re-stock every 
week, and make 130 per cent, per annum 
upon the capital employ2d. This sound- 
ed rosy, but to look at one side of the 
balance sheet only, and that the one 
showing profits alone, is to indeed dwell 
in a veritable fool's paradise. 
Look at the other side, where 
expenses are shown. Has any 
grocer yet found that his trade can be 
done, and all expenses paid, out of 2 1-2 
per cent.? Rents, rates, taxes, deprecia- 
tion, banking expenses, office expenses, 
wages, sundries; can these be paid out of 
2 1-2 per cent.? I never heard of it. That 
kind of calculation is a veritable will- 
o'-the-wisp, and has led many a man 
into the quagmire of bankruptcy. In 
Manchester a well-conducted shop Avill 
take 10 per cent, upon the turnover to 
pay expenses. Further, there id no ar- 
ticle in the average grocer's shop that is 
so expensive in its sale as sugar. So 
much time is taken up in weighing, mak- 
ing up, packing away. etc. I have not 
made any nice calculation, but I should 
say that where the expenses at 10 per 
cent, upon the whole turnover, sugar 
ought to be in a relative proportion of 
13 per cent, or 14 per cent Then., again, 
many men in business make a mistake in 
calculation of profits. I will suppose 
that a grocer has fancied he had placed 
an average of 10 per cent, of profit upon 
his goods, allowing what he considered 
a fair profit for margin. He draws for 
that week £110 in his shop, and, reckon- 
ing up, says, "I have made £11 gross 
profit, out of which to pay expenses and 
keep my family. Most tradesmen 
would say " quite right," but it is not 
right. The gross profit is but £10. He 
based his percentage upon first cost, not 
upon receipts. All these things go to 
show how much better it would be ;if 
the whole trade had a domestic list in 
the papers to guide them in fixing prices, 
this list to be based upon a profit to be 
agreed upon, and the wholesale prices, 
which would form the basis of this list, 
to be lowest prices to good buyers. I 
have spoken at considrable length about 
sugar, as I was requested to pay par- 
ticular attention to this article. I know 
that to advocate a 10 or 12 1-2 per 
cent, profit to be taken upon sugar is to 
advocate a revolution in our system of 
trade, but as sensible men we must ad- 
mit that we have now reached the limit 
of endurance, and it is high time we 
made a bold stand, and demand that 
which is just and right. My opinion is 
that no reasonable argument can be 
raised against it on the present condi- 
tion of our trade. As for butter, this is 
the only other article I intend to refer 
to at any length. All around us we have 
men advertsiing the finest Kiel butter 
at Is. 2d., and they take care to state 
upon this advertisement, " no higher 
price," thus leading the public to be- 
lieve that Is. 2d. is a reasonable price 
for best butter. We who are in the trade 
know perfectly well that best butter can- 
nt be bought at Is. 2d. per lb., no mat- 
ter how heavy our order is, and we also 
know that at the present time Is. 3d. 
per lb. will not yield pro It sufficient to 
pay shop expenses, not to mention other 
costs incidental to our trade. Is. 4d. is 
quite low enough, and if really finest 
butter is sold, Is. 4d. will not yield 
more than 10 per cent, profit. This is 
only sufficient to pay working expenses, 
without leaving anything for the em- 
ployer as profit actual. The only con- 
clusion we can arrive at is that a trades- 
man who is really selling butter at Is. 



2d. per pound, is either selling a very 
inferior butter, or else is retailing a 
margerlne as butter. The latter is far 
the most probable. The inspector may 
catch him, but there are a hundred 
chances to one he won't. Therefore it 
pays to run the risk. Had we a domes- 
tic market running in the papers, with a 
paragraph weekly calling attention to 
these facts, fraud of this kind would fast 
diminish, for it would not pay. The pub- 
lic would know too much to be so easily 
gulled by these tricksters. Trade honesty 
would fast run to a premium, but at 
the present time I maintain we have 
placed a premium upon fraud by our 
long silence. The small tradesman who 
has been tempted into these by-paths In 
order to eke out the profit he has so fool- 
ishly thrown away upon other articles 
may think I am merciless and arbitrary, 
is mistaken. Gentlemen, we want saving 
from ourselves. Do away with the temp- 
tation by boldly showing our position 
to the consumer, and the sin will either 
disappear or be fast reduced to a mini- 
mum .It is only the cunning trickster 
who cries ," let the public know nothing, 
or you cut away your living." This class 
of trader has caused our trade to become 
a by-word, and its members ignoble in 
the eyes of magistrates. It is said that 
the publication of such a market would 
give an impetus to co-operation. How 
does this tally with the oft-repeated as- 
sertion that members of co-operative 
stores are so blind that they will pay 
any percentage of profit to their own 
store ? If the latter is true, then to edu- 
cate them to what is right and reason- 
able would not only assist us but be 
also a benefit to themselves. The co- 
operative committees have no trump 
card so valuable as the list of prosecu- 
tions of private traders selling adulter- 
ated articles, and they make a drastic 
use of this in their general meetings, and 
it wins, too. The mischief of it is that 
the innocent often get condemned with 
the guilty. Gentlemen, I have said quite 
enough, and I will now propose the 
following resolution : " That in the opin- 
ion of this meeting a retail price of all 
articles of large consumption, published 
weekly in a local paper, to be caled a 
Domestic Market, would be a benefit to 
the trade of this district, and of good 
service to all honest tradesmen, the 
prices to be fixed by the committees of 
the two Associations. And that an an- 
nouncement of this will appear in all the 
daily papers, stating why we consider 
it advisable to adopt such a measure." 
I have been asked to formulate a price 
list myself and place It before the com- 
mittees of the two Associations, but to 
do this would not be wise. I only repre- 
sent one class of trader, and the two 
committees are representatives of every 
class, high and low, big and little ; and, 
further, I do not feel that I am called 
upon to do more than my share in help- 
ing to arrive at a sound basis of prices. 
I am jealous for the advancement of Man- 
chester trade, and, so long as I am a 
member of these associations, I shall try 
my best to make them " honorable be- 
fore all men."— Mr. Torkington In Man- 
chester Grocers' Review. 



A feather duster disperses but does not remove 
tbe dust from the store. 

A reputation for truthfulness is indispensable 
to permanent and satisfying success. 

Credit is often too cheap and overbuying far too 
common. Don't be guilty of the one, and don't 
abuse tbe other. 

One thing in particular should be impressed 
upon olerks— the necessity of careful attention to 
small customers 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



AN AGE OF HUSTLERS. 

This is pre-eminently an age of hustl- 
ers, and the sooner it is realized by the 
old conservative school of traders who 
believe that all they have to do is to 
know their respective occupations, open 
up with sufficient capital, and business 
come to them as it did to their prede- 
cessors, the better. A gentleman belong- 
ing to the latter class, who represent- 
'eda large wholesale house in this city, 
was complaining a few days ago of 
the terrible strain of competition that 
his firm was subjected to by other houses 
covering his ground and offering greater 
inducements than he cared to do, as he 
was determined not to sell goods at less 
than a certain percentage of profit. He 
also stated that for several years past 
he had lost ground, and had been com- 
pelled to trespass on his capital account. 
He therefore thought of following the 
example set by a large wholesale firm 
on McGill street and retiring from busi- 
ness. 

" Why," broke in the writer, " these 
are all hustlers who are covering your 
ground and taking your trade from you. 
Why not be satisfied with less profits 
and cover their ground the same as they 
do yours ? Your smaller profits would 
be offset by a much larger volume of 
trade." But no, he could not see it in 
that light, and if he could not clear the 
same profits that he had been accus- 
tomed to, the hustlers were welcome to 
take the greater risks, along with the 
smaller gains. This trader of the old 
school hit the nail admirably on the head 
when he described the business of the 
present era as one of greater risks and 
less percentage of profits ; and, depend 
upon it, those who refuse to do business 
on any other principles (we care not 
what branch they beloug to) will get 
left. The tide of competition keeps flow- 
ing on, and its flood will be felt with 
greater force as the years roll on. Nor 
do we see how this can be avoided, as 
long as the human family continues to 
increase at the tremendous ratio which 
marks its present course. In proportion 
to population, there are two traders in 
the present day to one of twenty years 
ago, and if the increase continues, the 
proportion will soon be three to one, 
which means a gradually decreasing per- 
centage of profits. To offset this, means 
should be devised whereby the cost of 
living Is proportionately less.— Trade 
Bulletin. 



known number in a sealed envelope. But 
like the " missing word " competition, 
these specious methods of advertising 
must bring those who adopt them within 
the provisions of the Lottery Act, and 
should therefore be avoided. Last year 
there was a craze for placing abnormal- 
ly long candles, lighted, in a window 
for customers to guess the number of 
hours they would burn, and bottles of 
coffee beans for guesses as to the number 
of each. We then stated that such were 
dangerously near an infringement of the 
law, and recommended that the prac- 
tice should be discontinued. But the 
" missing word" sensation has no doubt 
again fired the mind of some who are 
on the look-out for striking novelties 
with a desire to adopt some form of 
guessing, and therefore we remind them 
of the law which prohibits all games of 
chance. But there is & further reason 
why respectable tradesmen should not 
countenance such specious methods ; they 
encourage an unhealthy craving for the 
acquisition of money by other means 
than honest industry, and lead to a 
spirit of speculation which too often ends 
diasastrously. We are told that the 
" missing word " competitions have led 
in several cases to the thefts of small 
sums by office boys and junior clerks, 
whilst clerks who did not steal their 
employers' money with which to back 
their fancy word, were found spending 
time during office hours trying to find 
the desired word of phrase. To such an 
extent did this develop that a number 
of merchants are stated to have found 
funds for endeavoring to put a stop to 
the system. The ethical side of the ques- 
tion is probably not one that will trouble 
some minds, but it must not be forgotten 
that the spirit of gambling speedily de- 
velops, and those who are caught in its 
vortex not infrequently involve others in 
their ruin. We are glad, therefore, that 
the law has been brought to bear upon 
guessing competitions, and the sooner 
they are "banished from our midst the 
better it will be for the community.— 
Grocers' Chronicle. 



GUESSING COMPETITIONS. 

A tradesman recently made application 
to a London police magistrate for ad- 
vice as to the legality of a guessing com- 
petition. The method of the proposed 
competition was that a sealed envelope 
was placed in the tradesman's window 
containing a number, and all customers 
were supplied with tickers entitling 
them to make a guess, the most success- 
ful being rewarded with a prize of poul- 
try. It is hardly necessary to say that 
the magistrate declined to give any ad- 
vice, and added significantly, that if the 
competition was illegal, the police no 
doubt would soon proceed in the matter. 
The applicant urged that last year a 
neighbor of his had such a competition 
on the weight of a big cheese in his win- 
dow, and he was puzzled to see that 
snch a mode of advertising was less il- 
legal than the one he proposed. If we 
were called on to discriminate, we should 
certainly be inclined to say that there 
was less of chance in guessing the weight 
of a cheese than in guessing at an un- 



SUGAR PRODUCTION IN CUBA. 

An official report (Spain) has consider- 
able information in regard to sugar pro- 
duction In Cuba. Among other things it 
says : When the Cuban insurrection broke 
out in the year 1863, there were, between 
that place and Guantanamo, 129 sugar 
estates; now the number within the same 
district is seventeen. Nevertheless, the 
actual quantity of sugar produced in the 
two districts does not differ greatly from 
that of 24 years ago, the extra yield of 
each property compensating for the 
smaller number. Greater improvements 
have been made on the larger properties, 
which are now supplied with double 
mills, triple effects, vacuum pans, filter 
presses and furnaces for burning the 
green bagasse. At Manzanillo the pro- 
duction has increased considerably. In 
1889 that district produced 17,830 tons; 
in 1890, 22,103 tons, and in 1891, 23,- 
970 tons. The estates there have a large 
saving in facilities for shipment, being 
close to the coast, and each one has its 
own wharf. The new budget for the 
Island of Cuba has, together with the 
Increased import duties, caused consider- 
able alarm among the sugar planters, 
and unless changes are made consequen- 
ces may become very serious, not only 
to the individual planter, but to the is- 
land in general. Again, a new industrial 
tax, in addition to that already existing 
on the agricultural part, has been impos- 
ed, say of twopence per hundred pounds 
of centrifugal sugar manufactured, and 
half the said amount on molasses and 
other qualities of sugar. There is also 
a new tax on the manufacture of rum, 
and still another impost of £53 per an- 
num on each cane-crushing mill on an 
estate. 



Walter Baker & Co., the cocoa and choco- 
late manufacturers, have accepted the archi- 
tects plans for their World's Fair display. It 
will be in the form of a pavilion, and of itself 
will make a creditable display. 




Mr. Wraggs (to lodging-house Clerks- 
feller in der nex' room snores so awful ! 

CLERK. — Huh ! Yer didn't expect to get 
Orchestra for fifteen cents, did yer ? 



BOWERY MUSIC. 

See here, M 
a lullaby by 



ister, I can't s 
der Metropoli 



leep, because dat 
tan Opera House 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CUPS OF COFFEE. 

" If married folks only would refrain from 
conversation in the morning until they had 
their cup of coffee there would be fewer 
domestic disagreements," once said a de- 
lightful old lady with a varied experience at 
Washington and some foreign capitals. 
There is a gre it deal of truth in the odd re- 
mark, but who knows about coffee — the ex- 
tent of its consumption, where it comes from 
and where it all goes ? 

Brazil is the largest coffee producer in the 
world, and the great bulk comes from her 
wo provinces of Rio Janeiro and Santos, 
he latter furnishing the greater part of it 
and the finer coffee. Some quantity comes 
from the provinces of Bahia and Ceara, both 
a part of Brazil. Rio Janeiro and Santos, 
export every year from 5.750,000 to 7,oco,- 
000 bags of 130 ponnds each. Rio was form- 
erly the largest exporter, but Santos is rapid- 
ly outstripping her. 

Santos coffee is higher grade, has a finer 
flavor, and as a rule commands more money 
than other South American coffees. All 
other coffees are called " mild" as contra- 
distinguished from Brazilian. 

The largest producers of coffee aie Brazil, 
Venezuela, Guatemala, Costa Rica, United 
States of Colombia, Mexico (producing a 
high grade which is very popular, and the 
output is rapidly increasing), West Indies, 
Hayti and San Domingo. Cuba was a large 
grower of coffee, but the sugar interests have 
overshadowed it, and she now imports from 
this country. Little coffee is produced in 
Africa. Liberia and Zanzibar grow a 
small quantity. Manila is not a factor in the 
coffee trade of Amenca. Small quantities 
.come here, but most of the product goes to 
Europe. 

Ceylon has been the largest single pro- 
ducer of coffee in the world, but owing to 
the exhaustion of the soil primarily and later 
to a leaf disease, it has rapidly fallen into 
the background. 

Java, or East India coffee, is an important 
element in the coffee trade, is very popular 
and largely used. Mocha coffee is all 
shipped from Aden to London and Paris and 
transhipped here. This is supposed to be 
the coffee par excellence. It is an acid, light 
bodied coffee, and does not command as 
high a price as some Jnvas, or some of the 
finer grades of Central American coffee. 
The rinest coffee in the world cumts from the 
Plantation Ceylon, situated in the mountains 
in the interior of the island. Private growth 
Javas are very choice, and are probably 
equal to the best Ceylon. Mocha seed coffee 
from Santos is esteemed very highly, and 
large quantities of it are used for Mocha. 

Small beans are sifted from Santos and 



mild coffees, and these are retailed as Mocha. 
There is no way that the consumer can dis- 
tinguish genuine Mocha except by flavor. 
If coffee is clean it is apt to be good, and if 
the berries are regular in shape and uniform 
in size it is a good sign. 

The United States are the largest con- 
sumers in coffee in the world, with Germany 
second and France third. Great Britain 
consumes a small quantity of coffee and is 
constantly decreasing the amount at a rapid 
rate. Tea is replacing coffee in the British 
Isles very fast. The use of tea in this coun- 
try is falling off. 

Brazil furnishes most of our coffee, and we 
prefer the strong grades. Europe chooses 
the mild kind. The finest grades are used 
by England, while France drinks 40 per cent 
of chickory in her coffee. 

Holland is the great coffee mart of the 
world and is the greatest manipulator. They 
have more " tricks of the trade " over there 
than the rest of the world put togetner. 
New York, Hamburg, Havre and London 
are great speculative markets. Many mil- 
lions of bags of coffee are bought and sold 
every year on options. Of course, the 
amount thus dealt in is greatly in excess of 
the actual amount in existence. The poorer 
the people the poorer the grades of coffee 
used. 

Adulterations of coffee are not common 
in America except in the lowest grades, and 
this is done after it is roasted and ground, 
when beans and other foreign substances 
are added. It may be noted that specula- 
tion affects the retail price very lit:le. — Ex. 



A WORD TO CLERKS. 

No country offers so many and varied 
opportunities to ambition as does ours, 
and the spirit of restlessness is probably 
nowhere so general especially among 
young men. 

The visions of what might be breeds 
discontent with what is. The grocer's 
clerk dreams of proprietorship ; of the 
time when he shall own a store, work 
for himself, and take the profits. He rea- 
sons that because he can sell goods and 
understands the general duties of the 
store, he would have just as good a 
chance to establish a trade and do a 
successful business as his employer has. 
But he is apt to forget— if he ever 
thought of it— that the avenues of trade 
are strewn with wrecks of just such ad- 
venturous craft as he is hoping to em- 
bark in. 

It doesnot follow that because you are 
a good clerk, capable of performing all 
the duties of your position satisfactorily, 
that you would therefore make a suc- 
cessful merchant. There are almost num- 
berless qualifications necessary to wise- 
ly and successfully conducting a mercan- 
tile business that are not called Into ac- 
tivity in your position as clerk. This is 
not sayingthat you do not possess some 
or all of these qualifications, but, in your 
capacity as clerk, you have not proven 



that you have them and you are taking 
large risks by branching out for your- 
self with the chances ten to one against 
you. 

Another consideration more weighty 
than any other to be considered is con- 
tained in the fact that this is an era of 
consolidation. Everything tends to com- 
bined enterprise as against individual ef- 
fort. When, therefore, you attempt to 
multiply units by separating them from 
an established business you are defying 
the very force that is gaining strength 
every day— the law of co-operation. 

You may ask : " Must young men re- 
nounce ambition and be content to plod 
along as clerks without knowing what 
possibilities they are capable of ?" 

If by that is meant that you want sim- 
ply to work hard and devote all your 
time and energies to money-getting, any 
moralizing on that line don't amount to 
much, forwhen you pass off the scene of 
action neither you nor the world will be 
any better than had you remained a 
clerk. 

If you really want to bring out the 
best that is in you, perfect yourself as a 
clerk. Learn to do your work better and 
in less time. Lend your influence to se- 
curing betterconditlons. You want time 
for reading and self-improvement outside 
the store, therefore agitate for shorter 
hours. Make up your mind that you will 
not spend all your time that you are not 
eating or sleeping iu the store. Make 
yourself familiar with all the details of 
the business. Study your trade papers, 
watch the markets, make yourself in- 
creasingly valuable to your employer, 
and you will be in a position to sell 
your services for all that they are possib- 
ly worth. You will be able to secure a 
position of trust and responsibility with 
some large business concern that will 
give full play to your business instincts 
without the anxiety of running a store 
for yourself and you will have more time 
for the better things of life. — Commercial 
Enquirer. 



Restore goods'to their proper places as ■ en 
after using as possible 

Goods conveniently iocafed save time, money 
and temper in showing. 

No young man can possibly have mistaken his 
calling who finds in it wbatthe world wants done 



zivnTTisriLSPS 

Famous 
Boneless Codfish 

NEW and GENUINE. 

NOW ARRIVING. 
Packed in assorted Boxes, 5-lbs., 10-lbs., 
20-lbs , and 40-lbs., containing 1 and 2 lb. 
Bricks, also 

Skinless Codfish 

Packed in 100 lb. Boxes, Whole Fish. 

Delightful thick Codfish Steak. 

Orders can be filled at short notice after this. 

Stewart, Munn & Co., 
MONTREAL. 



It Pays to 

keep a 
Stock of 



PERRIN'S COUGH DROPS 



Write for quotations to 
D. S. PERRIN & CO., 
LONDON, CANADA: 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 




SPECIAL BLEND 



PAGKED BY 



TRADE 
MARK 



INDIGENOUS INOIANTCA PLANT 



THE KURMA TEA ESTATE, 

SYLHET, INDIA. 

y z lb. and i lb. Packages an 5 lb. Tins. 



DAVIDSON & ft AY, 



36 YONGE ST. 




A NEW SOURCE OF 

REVENUE 

TO THE GROCERS 



Sole Agents for Ganada, 

TORONTO. 

tS HIGHLAND . . 
EVAPORATED 
' 71 CREAM 



(Jbisl^eeteneb 



Add two parts of wat-r to one nt Evaporated Cream 
and it will answer perfectly for Dairy Cream. 
Di ute it with three parti of water, and you have an 
excellent quality of milk. Always pure and taintless. 



Prepared by 



FOR SALE BY ALL WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Helvetia |V|ilk (ondensihc (o., 



HlCHLANu, ill 
0. 5. A. 



WRIGHT & COPP. Ontario Agents. 

Toronto 



L. H. DOBBIN, Montreal, 

Quebec Agent. 




IT IS A GREAT SUCCESS. 

Grocers from all parts of the country report that it is a quick seller 
from the start. Order a case from your jobber at once. Every cus- 
tomer you sella bottle to will thank you after using it. Delicious 
Clam Broth can be made from it in one minute, with Hot water. 
Three sizes, retails at 25c, 50c, and 90c, in bottles only. Order from 

James Turner & Co., Hamilton, Ont., or write E. S. Burn- 
ham Company, "Manufacturers," 120 Gansevort St., New York, U.S.A. 
R. H. HOWARD & CO, Toronto. ROBT. MOORE, Travelling Agent, London, Ont. 

BATTY & CO'S PICKLES AND SAUCES 

Are the Finest Quality and Guaranteed Pure. 

A full line of these celebrated Goods are now kept 
in stock by 

Caverhill, Rose, Hughes & Co., 

Montreal. 
Sloan & Crowther, 

Toronto. 
James Turner & Co., 

Hamilton. 

123 *nd 125 Fii\ot>URY PAVEMENT, LONDON. WRIGHT & COPP, Dominion Agents, TOKON TO. 





30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE GROCERS' COMPANY. 

The history of this relic of the old 
English Trade Guild is worth reading. It 
is given as follows In The Newbury House 
Magazine : 

The Grocers' Company is the second 
in order of precedence among the City 
Guilds, and was an off-shoot in very early 
times of the Fraternity of Pepperers. The 
latter guild is first met with in the year 
1180, when it appears on the Pipe Rolls 
among eighteen "adulterine" guilds, or 
guilds which have established themselves 
without the Royal license. The Pepper- 
ers paid a fine of 16 marks for their 
transgression. 

In 1231, Andrew Bockerel, who was 
of Italian descent, and a prominent mem- 
ber of the Pepperers, became Mayor of 
London, having, in 1221, held the im- 
portant charge of farming the King's 
exchange. Bockerel continued in office 
as Mayor for seven successive years, and 
obtained commercial privileges for for- 
eign merchants, devoting the tax levied 
from them to conveying sweet water into 
London from Tyburn. In the space of 
114 years from this date, no less than 
nine Pepperers filled the office of Mayor 
during 21 years. It has already been 
remarked that citizens pursuing the same 
trade were accustomed in these early 
times to occupy the same locality, and 
the Pepperers were settled around St. 
Antholin's church, at the juncture > of 
Soper Lane, (now Queen street), with 
Watling street and Budge Row in St. 
Thomas Apostle. 

It appears from the earliest records 
that the Pepperers were officially con- 
nected with the duty of weighing in the 
city. Early in the fourteenth century 
they began to be called Grossarii, or 
those who weigh by the avoirdupois 
weight, of " Pesso Grosso," of the Vene- 
tians. They soon afterwards formed 
themselves into a fraternity, " the bet- 
ter to have, maintain, and increase, love 
and unity among themselves." This "fra- 
ternity of brethren Peppers, of Soper's 
Lane," was founded on the 9th of May, 
1345, " to the honor of God, the Virgin 
Mary, St. Anthony, and all Saints." On 
the 12th of June following 20 of the 
members dined together at the town 
mansion of the Abbot of Bury St. Ed- 
munds. Soon afterwards they left the 
monastery of St. Anthony in Thread- 
needle street, to attach themselves to 
the church of St. Antholin in Soper's 
Lane .where the Pepperers had originally 
settled. The early history of the fratern- 
ity is preserved In an ancient record 
known as the Black Book, which, fortun- 
ately, still remains in the possession of 
the Grocers' Company. 

In 1873 the Company of Grocers had 
taken the place of the Fraternity of St. 
Anthony, and rapidly became a great 
power in the city, through the great 
number of aldermen (no less than 17) 
whom it numbered in its ranks. They 
were led by Sir Nicholas Brembre, four 
times Mayor, who was beheaded in 1387. 
His overbearing conduct occasioned a 
complaint to Parliament from the Mer- 
cers' Company, and an Act of Common 
Council was subsequently passed prohib- 
iting any company from having more 
than six aldermen among its members. 

Ravenhill, the earliest historian of the 
company, defines the word grocer as dis- 
tinguishing merchants in opposition to 
inferior traders, "for that they usually 
sold In gross quantities by great 
weights." He also states that in old 
books the word signifies "merchants who 
in their merchandising dealt for the 
whole of any kind." 

Lydgate speaks of the grocers as hav- 



ing become retail spice dealers In the 
reign of Henry VI., and that they kept 
their standings in Chepe. In 1428 the 
company obtained from Henry VI. their 
first charter, under which they became a 
body corporate. In 1450 the grocers ob- 
tained the important privilege of sharing 
the office of garbeller with the city. The 
duties of this official was to enter any 
shop or warehouse, to view and search 
drugs, etc., and to sift and cleanse them, 
with the object of preventing adultera- 
tion. 

The following quaint epitaph of Simon 
Street, grocer, who died in 1459, and 
was buried in St. Antholin's Church, Is 
preserved in Stow's " Survey of London": 

Such as I am such shall you be : • 

Grocer of London some time was I, 

The King's weigher more than yer'es twenty; 

Simon Street called in my place, 

And good fellowship faine would trace ; 

Therefore in heaven everlasting life 

Jesu send me and Agnes my wife 

Kerlie Merlie. my words were tho, 

And Deo Hratias I coupled thereto, 

I passed to God in the yere of grace 

One thousand four hundred it was, &o. 

A new charter was granted to the com- 
pany by James I. in 1607, and an entry 
in the company's journals shows that 
they gave eight guineas to Joyce 
Knight, " paynter, stayner for lymning, 
guildinge, and flourishing the Company's 
charter with the King's and Prince's 
armes, with divers of the assistants, 
their armes, besides an allowance of 
eight shillings for two skins of vellum." 
The privileges of the Company were con- 
firmed, and other powers conferred upon 
them, by later sovereigns from Charles 
I. to George I. 

In all the troubles which befel the Liv- 
ery Companies, more especially in the 
century and a .half ending with the Revo- 
lution of 1688, the Grocers had their 
full share. The great fire also proved 
most calamitous to them ; but the Com- 
pany 'was kept together and restored 
upon the old lines by the exertions and 
liberality of its leading members, so as 
" to become, as they once were," to use 
the words of the solemn minute 
of the court of 1887, " a nurs- 
ery of charities and a seminary 
of good citizens." Among the most note- 
worthy benefactors who came forward 
to save the Company from dissolution on 
this occasion were Sir John Cutler, who 
rebuilt the parlor and dining-room at his 
own charge, and Sir John Moore, who 
gave £500 as a contribution towards 
rebuilding the hall, and, to satisfy the 
pressing claims of various parishes for 
their charities and arrears, the members 
of the court, on various occasions, con- 
tributed the necessary amounts out of 
their own pockets. In 1689, King Wil- 
liam III. honored the Company by taking 
upon himself the office of master for the 
year, making them also a grant, which 
ceased at his death, of three fat bucks 
out of Enfield Chase. In the charter 
granted to them in the following year 
they are described as carrying on the 
mysteries or arts of grocers, confection- 
ers, druggists, tobacconists, tobacco-cut- 
ters, and sugar bakers, or refiners of 
sugar. 

The site of Grocers' Hall possesses con- 
siderable interest. Part of it was occu- 
pied by a synagogue of the Jews before 
their expulsion from England in 1291. 
After this event the site came into the 
possession of a body of begging friars 
called the Brethren of the Sack. They 
were, in turn, dispossessed during the 
reign of Henry III. by Lord Fitzwalter, 
who resided at Baynard's Castle, hut 
had a family mansion in Coney Hope- 
lane, or Grocers' alley, adjoining the 
Friars' chapel. In 1411 the Grocers' 
Company purchased the chapel from a 



descendant of Lord Fitzwalter, and In 
the reign of Henry VI., the Company 
also purchased the family mansion, and 
used the entire site for the erection of a 
sumptuous hall. The house was subse- 
quently inhabited by various aldermen, 
who kept their mayoralties there. It 
afterwards became the Windmill Inn in 
the Old Jewry, and Is described by Ben 
Johnson as the favorite resort of the roy- 
sterers and master-spirits of the day. 

The Company began to build in 1427, 
and their hall was finished In the follow- 
ing year, when they dined together in 
"parlore," at an expense of £5 6s. 8d. 
Five years later they bought the remain- 
der of the Fitzwalter property, and with 
it enlarged their garden. This garden 
appears to have been the Company's 
pride, and contained alleys, hedgerows 
and a bowling-alley, with an ancient 
tower of brick and stone at the north- 
west corner. The bowling was confined 
as much as possible, to the brethren of 
the Company, and their "ancient neygh- 
bors dellyng in the Powlterie." The Gro- 
cers followed the practice of other com- 
panies in letting out their hall for pub- 
lic and private festivities. On 9th Febru- 
ary, 1564, the use of the common hall, 
parlor and kitchen were granted to " Mr. 
Mallorie, sonne to the Lord Mayor and 
others," " to make a supper to divers 
gentlemen of Gray's Inne for the great 
amltie between them and the Middle Tem- 
ple gentlemen." Abuses appear to have 
arisen in this system of letting, for in 
1610 it was ordered " that, for the fu- 
ture, the Company's hall shall not be 
made use of by strangers for burials, 
county feasts, and the like, without leave 
of the wardens." And, in 1678, the Com- 
pany's officers, making complaint that 
they were excluded on the hall being let 
to strangers " for dinners, funerals, coun- 
ty feasts or weddings," it was forbidden 
to be let unless they were employed. In 
1641, the "Grand Committee of Safety" 
removed Its sittings from Guildhall to 
Grocers' hall, and continued there at In- 
tervals for several years afterwards. In 
1648 the Company narrowly escaped the 
quartering of Parliamentary troops in 
their hall under Fairfax. Next year a 
grand entertainment was made by the 
Company at their hall to Cromwell and 
Fairfax, when the latter was presented 
by the Company with a basin and ewer 
of gold, and Cromwell with £300 worth 
of plate and 200 pieces of gold. The gro- 
cers afterwards entertained Cromwell, as 
Lord Protector, in a still grander style, 
and finally at the Restoration, General 
Monk, when they expended £215 on the 
feast, and enrolled him a brother of the 
Company. 

The great fire* destroyed the roof and 
wood-work of Grocers' Hall, but left the 
walls standing. In recognition of Sir 
John Cutler's liberal contributions to its 
restoration, the court ordered " that his 
statue and picture should be placed in 
the hall as memorials of the Company's 
esteem and gratitude." The first meet- 
ing and festival held in the Hall after the 
fire were on Lord Mayor's Day, 1669. 
In 1691 the use of the hall was granted 
as a chapel to the parishioners of St. 
Mildred till their own church could be re- 
built. The court minutes of this period 
take note of " the unseemliness and dis- 
turbance of taking tobacco and having 
drink and pipes in the court room during 
court sittings," and it was consequently 
resolved that a fine of £5 should be im- 
posed upon every member guilty of this 
offence ; and if any person have " a de- 
sire to refresh himself with a pipe of to- 
bacco or cup of drink, at a convenient 
time or lnteval of serious business,' he 
was " to wothdraw Into some retiring 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



81 



room more suitable and fit for the pur- 
pose.*' 

In the latter part of the seventeenth 
century Grocers' Hall was regularly let 
to the Lord Mayor for use as a Mansion 
House. Sir John Moore (Lord Mayor In 
1681) was the first who kept his mayor- 
alty in the new hall, and he paid the 
Company a net rent of £200 for It. 
About 1694 the tenancy was transferred 
to the newly-established Bank of Eng- 
land, who obtained a lease of the hall, 
yard, and offices for eleven years, for a 
fine of £5,000, and a loan of a similar 
amount without interest, the bank pay- 
ing all rates and taxes, and executing 
all repairs. Subsequently, the £5,000 
mortgage was merged into a fine, and 
the financial relief thus obtained formed 
a turning-point in the history of the 
Company. The bank directors held their 
courts here until the building of the bank 
in 1734. In the following year the Com- 
pany's circumstances having much Im- 
proved, the hall was forbidden to be let 
except for the mayoralty of an alder- 
man who was a member of the Company. 
In 1802 Grocers' Hall was rebuilt, but 
so Imperfectly that in 1827 a thorough 
repair was found necessary. The old 
buildings have recently given place to 
a handsome hall and offices, now nearly 
completed. The Princes street frontage 
provides a great architectural improve- 
ment to that important thoroughfare. 
Grocers' garden remained unchanged till 
the alterations of 1802, by which it was 
much reduced in size. By the formation 
of Princes street in that year the garden 
was nearly severed in half, but the Com- 
pany made an excellent bargain, receiv- 
ing for the slice of ground surrendered to 
the Bank of England more than £20,- 
000, the land having cost them, in 1433, 
but £81 17s. 8d. 

A brief notice must now be given of the 
important charities administered by the 
Grocers' Company. The Company has al- 
ways regarded the London Hospital as hav- 
ing peculiar claims upon its support and 
assistance, owing to its situation in the midst 
of the poor population of the East of Lon- 
don. Their first gift to the Hospital seems 
to have been in 1796; in 1868 and subse- 
quent years they contributed ^500 annually. 
In 1873 they gave the substantial sum of 
^20,000 towards the erection of a new wing 
to be called the " Grocers' Wing," and on 
its completion in 1876, a further sum of 
.£5,000 was contributed towards its furnish- 
ing when the wing was opened by Her Ma- 
jesty the Queen. 

In 1872, the Company established a 
middle class school for boys at Hackney 
Downs, under a scheme approved by the 
Charity Commissioners, by the provisions of 
which the income of certain obsolete chari- 
ties was applied to this purpose. The in- 
come not proving sufficient for the purpose, 
the balance, averaging about ^1,000 a year, 
has been made up by the Company, who also 
made a grant of ^6,000 to the school at its 
establishment. The Company founded, in 
i86t, six scholarships for pupils of the City 
of London School, which have since been 
* transferred to their middle-class school at 
Hackney Downs. They also purchased the 
right in perpetuity of presenting six boys to 
Christ's Hospital, and three children of de- 
ceased liverymen or freemen to the London 
Orphan Asylum. 

They have also founded six scholarships 
for the sons of freemen at Oundle School. 
This school was founded and endowed, to- 
gether with almshouses, in 1556, under the 
will of Alderman William Laxton, who 
placed the management of the charity in 



the hands of the Grocers' Company. There 
is an upper or classical school, for which a 
new building has been erected capable of 
holding four hundred boys. A modern 
school is also provided at Oundle for ht 
sons of f.rmers; sumptuous provision has 
been made by the Company for cricket and 
recreation grounds, boarding-houses, hal', 
library, museum, laboratory, etc. The Com- 
pany are also trustees of two other endowed 
schools — the free school in Witney in Ox- 
fordshire, founded by Henry Box, citizenand 
grocer, and the free school at Colwall, 
Herefordshire, founded by Humphrey Wall- 
win. They have the gift of eight exhibitions 
°f <£5° each, tenable for four years, four of 
them at the University of Oxford, and four 
at Cambridge. These were established by 
endowments left by Emma Backhouse and 
Mary Robinson in 1670. The C mpany has 
also founded two exhibitions of ^25 each, for 
unattached students at Oxford, tenable for 
four years. 

The Grocers' Company consists of a Prime 
Warden, three other Wardens, fifty-two as- 
sistants, and a large body of liverymen and 
freemen. The arms of the Company are : 
Argent a chevron, gules, between six cloves 
in chief and three in base, sable ; crest, a 
hemiet and torse, a loaded camel trippant 
proper, bridled of the second ; supporters, 
two griffins per fess gules and or ; motto, 
"God grant grace." 

More than one hundred and twenty Lord 
Mayors have belonged to this Company, and 
the roll of its honorary freemen includes 
numerous statesmen and other men of emin- 
ence in modern times. The mention of a few 
names will be sufficient : William Pitt, 
George Canning, Sir Robert Peel, the Prince 
of Wales, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Duke 
of Connaught, The Duke of Cambridge, Sir 
Leopold M'Clintock, Lord Napier of Mag- 
dala, Sir James Paget and the late Earl of 
Baconsfield 



BANK LOSSES AND MERCANTILE 
AGENCIES. 

The following was included in a paper 
presented to the recent meeting of west- 
ern bankers : " It is apparent that losses 
would be largely averted if the banker 
could be thoroughly and accurately in- 
formed as to the character and responsi- 
bility of his borrowers. Any plan, there- 
fore, that will bring him into possession 
of this information should be promptly 
adopted and persistently pursued. The 
information now furnished by the vari- 
ous commercial agencies is of great as- 
sistance in ascertaining the responsibil- 
ity of borrowers. Although their reports 
are not to be implicitly relied upon, be- 
ing often incomplete and occasionally 
misleading, yet no prudent banker can 
afford to dispense with their services, 
especially where his field of operations 
is so extensive as to preclude the possi- 
bility of his having personal acquaint- 
ance with every customer, and accurate 
knowledge of their affairs. It goes with- 
out saying that access to these sources 
of information should be at the command 
of every bank officer whose sphere of op- 
erations is not purely local and confined 
to the narrowest field. In addition to 
this he should employ every proper 
means to ascertain and systematically 
record, in such manner as to be readily 
accessible, all facts which affect favor- 
ably or unfavorably the standing of 
those who are asking, or likely to ask, 
favors at his hands. In the end, how- 
ever, the customer himself must be de- 
pended upon to make a full and com- 



plete exhibit of everything affecting his 
present responsibility and future success. 
It is unwise to accept the account of any 
man whose truthfulness is not fully es- 
tablished, and prudence dictates that no 
person should be accepted as a borrow- 
er who is not willing to make in confi- 
dence to his banker a complete exhibit 
of his resources and liabilities. The age 
of mystery as related to business affairs 
is happily passing away. The time was 
when business men considered it akin to 
an insult to be called upon, when asking 
credit, for a statement of their affairs, 
and when the publication of a full re- 
port of the condition of a bank would 
have been considered unwise, if not abso- 
lutely dangerous. Fortunately wiser and 
sounder views now prevail, and no right 
minded man or well-managed institution 
now hesitates, when asking favors, to 
place, the prospective creditor in full pos- 
session of the facts upon which credits 
can be intelligently extended. Modern 
methods make it necessary that all the 
barriers which a false pride has served 
to erect between a banker and his cus- 
tomer shall be completely removed, and 
that perfect frankness shall characterize 
their intercourse. This course is clearly 
for the interest of the borrower as well 
as the lender, for nothing places a cus- 
tomer on a better footing with his bank- 
er than a willingness to tell him the 
whole truth at all times and under all 
circumstances. 



TRADE SALES. 



The general stock of Thos. Fisher & Co., 
of Bolton, Ont, invoiced at $6900, was sold 
at Suckling's to J. Taylor, at 47c. on the 
dollar. 

On Tuesday next, the seventeenth inst., 
at 2 p. m., Suckling & Co. will sell at their 
warerooms in Toronto the general store 
stock, shop furniture and delivery service of 
John McConachie, Honeywood, Ont., at a 
rate in the dollar. The stock includes staple 
and fancy dry goods, hats, caps, furs, boots 
and shoes, groceries, hardware, crockery, 
etc., amounting to $3,078.51. One-third of 
the purchase money is to be cash, the re- 
mainder to be paid in two, four and six 
months, with interest, secured. 

The insolvent estate of R. Weatherell, 
general merchant, Oil City, Ont., is to be 
offered fir sale by J . W. Jones, at his auction 
rooms in London, Ont., on the 13th inst. 
The store stock is a general one, including 
dry goods, millinery, hats and caps, boots- 
and shoes, groceries, hardware, etc., valued 
at $6,757.87 



If you want books, it is rarely wise to pay 
double price for them to a travelling book-seller 



COWAN'S 
OCOAS ££ 
HOCOLATES 

Are Standard, and sold by 
all grocers. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




SALES MADE OR PENDING. 

The grocery stock of J. D. Martineau, 
Montreal, is sold. 

Mrs. E. Ruttan, grocer, Picton, Ont., is 
succeeded by James Clark. 

Robert Miller, grocer, Amherst, N. S., is 
succeeded by A. Scrimgeour. 

W. J. Tippens, confectionery dealer, ad- 
vertises his business for sale. 

H. W. McCulloch, grocer, Toronto, has 
sold his stock and called a meeting of his 
creditors. 

R. Dunsmuir & Sons, general merchants, 
Union Mines, B.C., have been succeeded by 
Simon Leiser. 

The general store stock of Thos. Fisher & 
Co., Bolton, has been sold to A. Taylor 
at 47c. in the dollar. 

The general store stock of John McCona- 
chie, Honeywood, Ont., is advertised for sale 
by auction on the 17th inst. 
PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

J. P. Coutleeand J. D. Coutlee are regis- 
tered proprietors in the Canada Supply Co., 
Montreal. 

Alexander T. Paterson and R. McD. 
Paterson are registered proprietors in the 
firm A. T. Paterson & Co., general mer- 
chants, Montreal. 

Andrew Bros., general merchants, Mid- 
dleton, N. S , have dissolved, Geo. M. 
Andrew continuing. 

N. Carter & Sons, provision merchants, 
St. Stephen, N. B., have dissolved, Frank 
N. Carter continuing. 

Connolly & Co., grocers and liquor mer- 
chants, Charlottetown, P. E. I., have dis- 
solved, John Connolly continuing. 
FIRES. 

Norman Hayes, barrel manufacturer, 
Halifax, is burnt out. 

The Little Bay Island Packing Co., 
Perry's Island, NflJ., is burnt out. 

A. S. Harrison, grocer and confectioner, 
Norwood, Ont., is burnt out. Insured. 

John Windsor, general merchant and fish 
dealer, Petit Rocher, N.B., is burnt out. In- 
sured. 

DEATHS. 
Joseph E. Coulter, wholesale grocer, Fred- 
ericton, N.B., is dead. 

C. H. Slawson, dealer in dairy supplies 
and cheese, Ingersoll, Ont., is dead. 

James F. Cochran, of J. F. Cochran & 
Son, general merchants, Brooklyn, N.S., is 
dead. 



DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS,COMPROMISES. 

G. L. Pelletiei, general merchant,Matane, 
Que., has assigned. 

E. Morin, grocer, Amherstburg, Ont., has 
assigned to Alfred Robinson. 

W. A. Casselman, grocer, Cardinal, Ont., 
has assigned to Chas. P. Glasford. 

The creditors of H. W. McCulloch, gro- 
cer, Toronto, have been called together, 

Beaudry & Co. crockery merchants, Mon- 
treal, have assigned to Kent & Turcotte. 

Demand of assignment has been made on 
A. Bissette, general merchant, Iberville, 
Que. 

Cleophas Rousseau, grocer, Quebec, has 
assigned. His creditors meet on the 14th 
inst. 

Paquette & Therien, general merchants, 
St. Remi, Que., are preparing a statement 
of their position. 

The book debts in the estate of C. L. 
Ingraham, general merchant, Sydney, N. S., 
have been assigned. 

Griffin & Co. (M. E— Mrs. C. B.— Griffin 
only), general merchant, Ridgetown, Ont., 
has assigned to John Lennox, Hamilton. 



ing in which way they could be up to those 
in the same trade and sell at the same price 
and make a profit, it would be greatly to the 
interest of the dormant grocer, who expects 
that all matters in the trade should be shaped 
to a mould of his own making. — Retail Gro- 
cers' Journal, San Francisco. 



HOW IT IS DONE. 

A great many of the dormant retail grocers 
are canstantly finding fault with their up-to- 
the-times confreres. The cause for complaint 
is that they (the live grocers) are selling too 
cheap. "Why." some of them will say, "I 
could not sell at that price, simply because I 
paid more by the case than he is retailing 
them by the single package." And their 
statement is true in every particular. But 
whose fault is it? The live grocer keeps 
posted by reading trade papers and watc ung 
the movement of the market, while the other 
would rather prefer to play pedro or else do 
most anything except what relates to and 
would benefit his business, and as for reading 
trade papers, that is time wasted ; the read- 
ing is too dry ; there is not the pith to it that 
is contained in an account of a prize fight ; 
and so on. But when it comes to finding 
lault, then he can waste plenty of time To 
approach one of these men with an applica- 
tion to subscribe for a trade paper produces 
about the same result as does the request of 
a slow paying customer who has already a 
large score recorded against his name, for 
the loan of fifty dollars to buy Chrstmas toys 
for the children. 

However, it is the same with trade papers 
as it is with everything else, one must be 
brought up to the use of ihem in order to be 
able to grasp the benefit to be derived from 
their perusal. With a few lessons, such as 
some of the retail grocers will receive this 
summer, we think that many of them will 
become apt scholars and profit by their 
losses, not alone in having to pay more for 
their goods, but also on account of losing 
trade by not being able to cope with the up- 
to-the times grocers. If less time were de- 
voted to fault-finding and more to ascertain- 



THE CREDIT HYDRA. 

Credit is the ball and chain around the 
leg of the merchant, the incubus of trade 
which there is no throwing off and which, in 
many cases, proves so heavy a load that it 
drags down the bearer thereof to commer- 
cial annihilation, says the Baltimore Com- 
mercial Advertiser. More has been written 
on the evils of credit than upon any other 
subject connected with mercantile affairs, 
and yet to-day the question how to eliminate 
its risks from the daily business transactions 
of wholesale merchant and retail trader alike 
is as far from satisfactory settlement as ever. 
There is one thing which may be regarded 
as settled at all events. So long as business 
is done, just so long will the merchant, 
whether wholesale or retail, be obliged to 
accept a future settlement, of more or less 
definiteness as to date, for a present trans- 
action. Whether the volume of this trade 
be much or little, that it will involve losses, 
may be taken for granted, for the most astute 
business man, even with the safeguards of 
modern business practice at his command, 
has not succeeded in protecting himself from 
the unforseen. 

Most men, we believe, who enter into 
business, whether upon a large or small 
scale, do so with the honest purpose to pay 
their debts. When a dealer has sufficient 
capital to make a fair start by paying cash 
for his stock, provided he is wide-awake and 
energetic, and has started in a locality where 
an enterprise of the kind in which he has 
embarked is needed, the chances are that he 
will ask very few favors from the jobber. 
This class of dealer is usually too anxious to 
make cash settlements and save every pos- 
sible cent in the way of discounts. It is also 
the class whose trade the wholesale mer- 
chants are anxious- to get. But as all men 
who depend npon their own exertions for a 
livelihood are not so favorably situated as to 
be able to make a beginning in this way, 
they are compelled in most cases to depend 
upon the forbearance and generosity of the 
wholesale dealer who, if favorably disposed 
on account of former knowledge of his cus- 
tomers, as the result of an investigation of 
his business chacacter and record, will se- 
cure the required stock upon terms within 
the reach of the customer. A ^beginning is 
thus made which in after years may broaden 
out and bear fruit in a long business inter- 
course mutually profitable and advantageous 
to both, or else an experience in which mis- 
placed confidence, worry and financial loss 
may result to the accommodating merchant, 
illustrating anew the risks of credit. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



POOR BOYS, 

Great men are a nation's choicest treasure. 
There are many stately and exclusive doors 
open only to those who bear titles and de- 
grees, but to the hearts and homes of all true 
Americans, those who have risen by their 
own exertions from poverty and obscurity to 
wealth and eminence, find a welcome. It 
has been said, " Biography is the most uni- 
versally pleasant and profitable of all read- 
ing." If we would understand what heroism 
is, we must study the lives of heroic men and 
women. A living patriot will teach us more 
of patriotism than a thousand books. 

Let us recall the lives of some of the men 
in active life who were once poor boys ; 
whose lathers' names are unknown in public ; 
who by years of persistent endeavor attained 
wished for and deserved success. Washing- 
ton, Franklin, Grant, Garfield, are men be- 
longing to this class. They have made the 
world richer and better, and have passed 
away leaving others to make for themselves 
similar positions. We have poets, inventors, 
statesmen, divines who have become popular 
benefactors, not for an age only, but for all 
time. 

Among inventors such as Morse, Whitney 
and Robert Fulton, Thomas A. Edison rises 
pre-eminent in his superior practical inven- 
tive power. Born at Milan, Ohio, young 
Edison began life poor. Though of humble 
parentage, yet he has surpassed the pro 
foundest thinkers of our times. To him we 
are indebted for the electric light, the only 
artificial light whose brilliancy approaches 
that of the sun. Many of our inventors have 
died in poverty, receiving no petuniary 
benefit for their genius, but Edison received 
$100,000 for the discovery of the carbon 
telephone. 

Our Presidents have been men whose 
early struggles against adverse circumstan- 
ces strengthened and prepared them for 
their important positions. Benjamin Harri- 
son, when a young man with his family at 
Indianapolis, living in three plain rooms, 
not ashamed of his poverty or the self-evi- 
dent fact that clients would be received cor- 
dially at all hours, had no visions of living 
in the executive mansion ; Mrs. Harrison, 
performing the monotonous duties of a house- 
wife, could not see in the future the position 
she would hold in the American mind and 
heart. They began life in poverty, which is 
but the beginning of wealth and power, hav- 
ing the boundless possibilities of the mture 
always before it. 

In all these lives there have come patience 
by being poor , courage by coming in con- 
tact with opposition,knowledge of character 
they would not have gained had they been 
carefully shielded by the surroundings which 
money gives to the sons of the rich. — Mer- 
chant Sentinel. 



The trader who pays his way must sell at a 
profit, and cannot afford to cut helow others in 
the same line. 




It fleVer 
Varies . . 




~'1iii- 



Sold only in Gans by the Live 

Wholesale and Retail 

Trade 

and Manufactured by 

The Hamilton $pke 
and (offee (0 . . . 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




THE CANADA MEAT PACKING CO 



■1 

MOiLsrT:R:Ej.A_:u 

BEEF AND PORK PACKERS, 

Carers of the Celebrated C.M.P Brand of Smoked Meat, Sugar cured 
extra-flavored Hams and Bacon. 



Compressed Corned Beef. Ox and Lunch Tongue. 

Pure Lard a Specialty. 



WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



Condensed ffiinee ]\fleat 



Delicious Mince Pies 

every day in the 

year. 

Handled by retailer 
as shelf or counter 
goods. No waste. 
Gives general satis- 
faction. 

Sells at all seasons. 

Will not ferment in 
warm weather. 



VS^. 



AMOUNT F0»r,r„ E "' 0Rt, *LFTI.»T 
2"F E *IFT0O-S* DDAU T'U 
Ai e &V_°«TH E *£!i£«THM 



1»fIB 



The best and cheapest 
Mince Meat on 
Earth, Price re- 
duced to {12.00 
per gross, net, 



J. H. WETHEY, St. Catharines, Ont. 




Portable Coffee Roasters, 

FOR RETAIL GROCERY TRADE, 

—ALSO — 



\ STATIONARY COFFEE ROASTERS 



and Coffee and Spice machinery for whole- 
sale trade. 

Send for new Illustrated Catalogue. 

THE HUNCERFORD (0., 

67 Peeirl Street, New York. 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A GREAT HIT ! 




EXTERIOR VIEW. 



Adams' Tutti Frutti Automatic 
Girl Sign Box. Works by clock 
work. A big attraction for your 
window. Send for circular. 

ADAMS' & SONS CO., 

I 1 and 13 Jarvis St., 
TORONTO, ONT. 




INTERIOR VIEW. 



^4444l44Ai«4444iiUiAi444ii4444iAii44iiUUii44Ui444Ui4U4444UUU44U444iUiii^ 




THE KING OF BLACKINGS _l 
F. F. DALLEY & CO. - - HAMILTON, ONT. 

:e. ibirctw^st & sonsrs 

7 Gar-rick Street, London, England, and at 26 Rue Bergere, Paris 

BOOT PREPARATIONS 

SOLD EVERYWHERE. 




MELTON1AN 

BLACKINC 

(As used in the Royal 
Household) 

Renders the Boots soft, dur- 
able and waterproof. 




MELTONIAN 
CREAM 

(white or black) 

For Renovating all 

kinds of Glace Kid 

Boots and Shoes. 



i ROYAL j 

Lutetian Cream 

SHOWN IEATHER BOCtTS 
* SHCtC HARNISS 1 

t.BROWN-SON 



7CarrickS'LonoonW 



ROYAL 

LUTETIAN 

CREAM 

The best for Cleaning 
and Polishing Rus- 
sian and Brown Lea- 
ther Boots, Tennis 
Shoes, etc. 




NONPAREIL 

DE GUICHE 

Parisian Polish 

For Varnishing Dress Boots 
and Shoes is more elastic and 
easier to use than any other 



Messrs. Salomon & Phillips, 33 Spruce St., New York, sole A g .nu for c.n.d« and u.s.a 



Cough Drops 

Unequalled for coughs and sore 
-throat. 

Packed in elegant 5 lb. Tins or Bottles. 
Prices on application. 



Win. Paterson & Son 

BRANTFORD. 

[HE "MOST POPULAR" BUCK LEAD. 
THE " MOST REMARKABLE " POLISH. 



1 PLEASE ASK. EOS AND USB OJTLT 

NIXEY'S SPECIALITIES OF STERLING VALUE, 



Nixeys 

.Z? /# C'/t CEEZHi 

Lead 




LiuudreUs ui testimonials from ail parts, including 
Her Majesty's, Royal Buckingham Palace. 

HIOHEBT KXHUITION HONOURS. 



FOR BRIGHT. SIL VERY, QUICK POLISH 
ST0VK4 8MTII, 4* 




ALWAYS BSE 






$* 



^ PLUMBA60" 

STOVE POLISH. 



Always Bright A Beautiful. 
In Large Packets Id. & 2d. each. 



L'h only for Laundry Purpose*, producing the best results. 




NIXEY'S 
BLUE 



"SOHO 
SQUARE" 



THE PUREST— BEST— MO SEDIMENT. 

OWLT SAL? TSS P.DAL QPAWT1TT 

Mqru.p. 
Sight l-oi. squares In Box for W. 
Of all Grocers and Oilmen ; or write to 
IS. SOHO SQUARE, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



For Knives. Porks. Brass 
?%&V£<0?V and Steel Work. Ac, Ac 
^WX Won't Wear the Blades like 
others. . 

6d. and la. Tins. 

NIXEY'S 

iX>» KNIFE POLISH. 



OF ALL STORBKBBPKRS EVERYWHERE. 
Wholesale : W. G. NIXEY. London, England. 



Canadian representatives : 

Mr. W. Matthews, 7 Richmond St. 

East, Toronto. 
Mr. Charles Gyde, 33 St. Nicholas 

St,, Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 



The neglect to look after minute details in the 
factory is a source of great loss to many pro- 
ducers. 

Competition is keen and active and the only 
way to meet it successfully is to buy from the 
best, houses, and at lowest prices. 

You can lose more than we do 
by not subscribing for this paper. 



SITUATION WANTED. 
MARATIME PROVINCES. 



WANTED— A SITUATION AS TRA- 
veller for Provisions or Groceries, 
also side lines. Apply care 
1593 B., this office. 



THE FINEST 

IN THE LAND. 




EVERY CHOCOLATE IS STAMPED 

GI-- IB_ 



GANONG BROS., Ltd. 

ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



CHA5. SOUTHWELL ft CO., "Kakd 

ENGLISH JAMS, JELLIES, PRESERVES, AND MARMALADES. 

specialty in CLEAR JELLY ndRr\dLdDE5 



m Scotch Home Made," 
" Perfection." 

" Lemon Jelly Marmalade," 
«« Lime Fruit flarmalade," 



Made from 
Seville Oranges, 
Hessina Lemons, 
West India Limes. 



PUT UP IN GLASS JARS SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR EXPORT. 

Chas. Southwell & Co. are also manufacturers of Candied Peels, Excelsior 

Packet Concentrated Jellies, etc., etc. All goods having 

their brand are exceptionally choice quality. 

FULL PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. WORKS: D0(KHEAl>, LOKOON, ENClAND. 



GROCERS ! 

Samples of our new lines of Brooms are 
now in our travellers hands. 

It will pay you to handle them, and we 
particularly call your attention to our brands. 



Extra Fine. 



Fine. 



Select. 



Imperial, 
Victoria, 
Standard, 
Leader, t! pp«j 

We also manufacture all kinds of Special 
Brooms for Floor, Yard, Stable, Warehouse, 
and Factory use. 

CURLING BROOMS ON BAMBOO 
HANDLES OUR SPECIALTY. 

Our best grades have seperate Paper 
Cover on each Broom. 

SEND FOR NEW PRICE LIST. 

CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers, TORONTO. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER PRICES CURRENT. 



Toronto, Jan. 12, 1893. 

This list is corrected every Thurs- 
day. The prices are solicited for pub- 
lication, an 1 are for such qualities 
and quantities as are usually ordered 
by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt 
pay are generalij obtainable at lower 
prices. 

All quotations in this department 
are under the direct control of the 
Editor, and are not paid for or doc- 
tored by any manufacturing or job- 
bing house unless given under their 
name ; the right being reserved to 
exclude such firms as uo not furnish 
reliable information. 

BAKING POWDER. 

pure gold. per doz 
}5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

|i lb. cans 1 doz. 

in case 16 00 

\-iV, lb. cans, 1 and 

2 doz in ease 10 50 

ll6oz. cans 1.2 and 

4 doz. in case.... 4 
|l2 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 70 

|8 oz. cans. 2 and 4 

doz. in case 2 40 

"^*~ 1 """""'"*' 6 oz. cars, 2 and 4 

doz in case 1 90 

4 oz. cans, 4 and 6 doz in case ... 1 25 
Per doz 

Dunn's No. 1. in tins 2 00 

" 2 " 75 

Cook's Gem, in 1 lb pkgs $1 75 

" " 7 oz pkgs 85 

" " 2oz " 40 

" " 51b tins 65 

1 " bulk, per lb.... 12 

Per doz 

Empire, 5 dozen 4 oz cans $0 75 

* 4 8 " 1 15 

2 16 " 2 00 

Vt 5 lb cans 9 00 

bulk, per lb 15 






COOK'S FRIEND. 



(in Paper Packages.; Per doz 

Size 1, in 2 and 4 doz boxes — $2 40 

" 10, in 4 doz boxes 2 10 

" 2, in 6 " 80 

" 12,in6 " 7C 

" 3,in4 " 45 

Pound tins, 3 oz in case 3 0c 

12 oz tins, 3 oz in case 2 40 

5 oz tins, 4 " 1 10 

5 lb tins, H " 14 00 

Ocean Wave, H lb, 4 doz cases 75 

OCEAN fe*. " : iS 
WAVE US:*' n :',S 

white star. per doz 

4oz tins, 3 doz in case 75 

12 " 2 doz in case 2 00 

51b "J " 9 00 

5oz glass jars, 2$ doz 

in case 1 10 

10 oz glass jars, 2 doz 

in case 2 00 

Bulk, per lb 15 




0?PRICdS 

CREAM 

gAKlHg 
*0WDEH 



doz. in 
case 
Dime cans, 4 



4 oz 

6 



16 " 
2Jlbs 

4 " 

5 " 
" 



1 



3 

3 

3 

1 to 4 

1 to 3 

or 1 

orl 

or 1 

i 



Price 

p.doz 

$1 uo 

1 50 

2 25 

3 00 

4 25 

5 75 
12 00 
18 25 
22 75 
44 00 



BISCUITS. 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFEC- 
TIONERY OO. 

Abernethy 8 J 

Arrowroot $0 11 

Butter 6 

3 lbs 20 

Cabin 7J 

Cottage 8J 



Digestive 10 

Daisy Wafer 16 

Garibaldi 10 

Gingerbread 11 

Ginger Nuts 10 

Graham Wafer 09 

Lemon 10 

Milk 09 

Nic Nac 12 

Oyster 06 

People's Mixed 10J 

Pic Nic u 09 

Prairie 08j 

Rich Mixed 14 

School Cake 11 

Soda 06 

" 3 lb 20 

Sultana 11 

Tea 11 

Tid Bits 09J 

Variety 11 

Village 07$ 

Wine 08$ 

BLACKING. 
Day & Martin's, pints, perdoz $3 20 
X " 2 10 

M " 1 10 

Spanish, No.3 4 50 

" " 5 8 00 

" " 10 9 00 

Japanese, No. 3 4 aO 

" " 5 7 50 

Jaquot's French No. 2 3 00 

" " 3 4 50 

" " " 4 8 00 

" " " 5 10 00 

" 1 gross Cabinets, asst, 7 50 

Egyptian, No. 1 9 CO 

" " 2 4 50 

P. a. FRENCH PRESSING (LADIES.) 

For ladies' and children's boots and 
shoes. 

per doz 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box $2 00 

No. 4, " " 1 25 

P. G. FRENCH RLAOKING. 

per gross 

&No. 4 $i 00 

M No. 6 4 50 

!4 No. 8 7 25 

hi No. 10 25 



BLACK LEAD. 

NIXEY'S "2 2 

O =5 

Refined in Id., 2d , 4d. and h] u 

Is. packages, (91b. boxes) 7s 6d $2 5 
Jubilee in loz. and 2 oz. 

round blocks in cartons 

(9 1b. boxes) 4s 3d 2 00 

Silver Moonlight, Plum- 
bago Stove Polish (13$ 

lb. boxes) 

6J lb. in large $d. pkts, 1 

gross 4s 3d j so 

13 lb. in large $d. pkts, 2 

gross 8s 6d 3 00 

13 lb. in large Id. pkts, 1 

gross 7 S 6d 2 50 

13 lb. in large 2d, pkts, J 

gross 7s 6d 2 50 

Recintt's Black Lead, per box. 1 15 

Each box contains either 1 gro., 1 
oz.: i gro , 2 oz , or 1 gro., 4 oz. 

F.F. DALLEY & CO. 

? er gross 

Silver Star Stove Paste 9 00 

Packed in fancy wood boxes, each 
box contains 3 doz. 

BLUE. 

Reckitt'd Pure Blue, per gross 2 1C 

NIXEY'S 

Soho Square in 81b. boxes, of 
16x6d boxes, London 6s Od 

Soho Square in 8 lb. boxes, of 
16x6d. boxes, Canada $2 25 

CORN BROOMS. 

chas. boeckh & SONS, per doz 

X Carpet, 4 Btrings, net $3 60 

2 " 4 " " 3 20 

3 " 3 " 2 

XXXHurW " " 2 90 

IX " 4 " " 2 65 

2X Parlor 4 " " 2 60 

3 " 3 " 2 25 

4 " 3 " " 1 85 

5 " 2 " " 1 50 

Warohouse4 " " 3 25 

Ship 4 " " 4 00 

1 Cable 2 wire bands, net 3 25 

2 " 3 " " ... 4 00 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 





FOR COOKING 



ST. LAWRENCE 



CORN STARCH. 



iiiiiL'r======================================================r====r==============================r===================jiiin 




Prices Current Continual — 

CANNED GOODS. 

Per doz 

Apples, 3's $0 85 SI 00 

" gallons 1 75 2 00 

Blackbejries. 2 2 00 2 25 

Blueberries, 2 1 00 1 10 

Beans, 2 90 1 00 

Corn, 2's 85 1 00 

" Special Brands 130 160 

Cherries, red pitted, 2's 2 10 

Peas, 2's 85 1 00 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 175 

" Sugar. 2's 1 50 

Pineapple 2's 2 75 

Peaches, 2's 2 00 2 25 

" 3's 3 00 3 25 

ii Pie 3 s 

Plums, Gr Gagesis's!.!!!! 175 2 00 

" Lombard 1 75 1 65 

" Dmuson Blue 150 190 

Pumpkins, 3's 85 1 00 

,r gallons 3 00 3 25 

Raspberries, 2's 2 00 2 40 

Strawberries, choice 2's . 2 00 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 165 

Tomatoes. 3's 85 100 

"Thistle" finnan haddies 1 50 

Lobster. Clover Leaf 2 40 2 50 

" Crown flat 2 40 2 50 

" " tall 1 90 2 00 

Other brands J 80 2 10 

Mackerel 100 110 

Salmon, tails 145 160 

" flats 170 

Sardines Albert, H's tins 12% 

«• " %'s " 20 

Martiny, Vs " . 10 10tf 
" %'a " . 16 17 

" Other brands, 95£ 11 16 17 

" P&C, Vs tins 23 25 

" » %'a " 33 36 

Sardines Amer, Vs " 6J 8 

" " Vs " 9 11 



CANNED MEATS. 

(CANADIAN) 

Comp. Corn Beef lib cans SI 60 SI 75 

• ' " 2 " 2 65 2 80 

• ' 4 " 4 80 5 00 

• i " 6 " 8 00 8 25 
ii " 14 " 17 50 18 50 

MincedCollops, 2lbcans 2 60 

Roast Beef 1 " 1 50 

>' 2 " 2 60 2 75 

» 4 ' 4 75 

Par Ox Tongue, 2% " S8 00 8 25 

Ox Tcugue 2 " 7 85 8 00 

Lurch Tongue.. 1 " ... 3 2o 

ii 2 " 6 00 6 25 

English Brawn. 2 " 2 75 2 HO 

Camb. Sausage. 1 " 2 50 

.2 " .... 4 00 

Soups, assorted. 1 " 135 

" " . 2 " ... 2 25 

Soups & Boulli..2 " .... 1 80 

i " .6 " .... 4 50 
Potted ChickeD, Turkey, or 

Game, 6oz cans 1 60 

Potted Ham, Tongue or Bt9f, 6 

oz cans 135 



Devilled Tongue or Ham, V, lb 

cans 1 40 

Devilled Chicken or Turkey, 

V\ lb cans 2 25 

Sandwich Ham or Tongue, y, 

lb cans 1 50 

Him, Chicken and Tongue, $ 

Ibcans 1 75 



CHEWING GUM. 

ADAMS & SONS CO. 

To Retailers 

Tutti Frutti, 36 5c bars SI 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 235c. packets 75 

Orange Blossom 150 pieces 1 00 

(each box contains a bottle of high 
class perfume. Guaranteed first 
class) 
Monte Cristo, 180 pieces... ISO 

(with brilliant stone ring) 
Sappota, 150 pieces ... 1 00 

Sweet Fern, 230 " ... 75 

Bed Rose, 115 pieces ... 75 

Magic Trick, 115 " ... 75 

Oolah 115 " ... 76 

Puzzle Gum 115 pieces .... 75 

Bo-Kay 150 " ... 1 00 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c. bars 1 20 

Flirtation Gum (115 pieces) 65 

Automatic ) 

Tut.ti Frutti Girl.... V800 pieces. 6 00 
Sign Box (new) ) 

C. B. BOMEBV1LLE. 

Mexican F«-uit, 36— 5c. Bars . . 1-20 

Pepsin (DyspepRia), 20— 5c. Bars 70 

Sweet Sugar Cane, 150 pieces 1 00 

Celery, 100 " 70 

Lalla Rookh (all flavors) 100 " 70 

Jingle Bell, liO " 1 00 

Cracker, 144 " 1 00 

O-Dont-O, 144 ' 1 00 

Little Jap, 100 " 70 

Dude Prize; 144 " 1 00 
('lock Gum compnsiiig,500 pieces 
Gum (assorted flavors), and 1 
'Little Lord Fauntleyroy" clock 

fuaranteed.) 3 75 

,a Rosa (20-mc. pieces) 1 40 

B>tby (100-lc. pieces; 65 

Alphabet (100-lc. pieces) 6i 

Keuo Prize (144-lc. pieces) 1 00 

Love Talk (100-lc pieces) 70 

CHOCOLATES & COCOAS. 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL <fc OO.S 

Chocolate — Per lb 

French, Vs.... 6 and 12 lbs. 30 
Caraccas. Vs. .6 and 12 lbs. 35 
Premium, J's .6 and 12 lbs. 30 

Sante, Vs, 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond, Vs, 6 and 12 lbs. 22 
Sticks, gross boxes, each.. 0j 
Cocoa, Homwpat'c.Vs, 8 & 14 lbs 30 
" Pearl " " " 25 
" London Pearl 12 & 18 " 22 
" Rock " " 30 
" Bulk.inbxs 18 

EPP'd. 

Coeoa — per lb 

Case of 112 lbs each .15 

Smaller quantities 37} 



BENSDORP'S BOYAL DUTCH COCOA. 

\i lb. cans, per doz $2 40 

% 4 50 

1 " " " 8 5C 

FBY'S 
(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents) 

Chocolate— per lb 

Carracas, J's, 6 lb. boxes 40 

Vanilla. J's, " 40 

" Gold Medal " Sweet, 6 lb bxs. 30 

Pure, unsweetened, J's, 6 Id bxs. 40 

' Fry's " Diamond J's, 6 lb bxs. 26 

" Fry's " Monogram, J, 6 lb bxs. 26 

Cocoa— per doz 

Concentrated, J's, 1 doz in box... 2 40 

J's, " . . 4 50 

" 1 lbs, " ... 8 75 

Homcepathic, J's, 14 lb boxes 34 

Jibs, 12 lb boxes... 34 



JOHN P. MOTT & CO. '8 

R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott's Broma per lb SO 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homoeopat'c Cocoa (is) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa 35 

Mott's Breakf. Cocoafin tins) 40 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate.. 28 

Mott's Caracas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate... 22 
Mott's French-Can Chocolate 20 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Choc 26 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 30 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 5 

Mott's Vanilla Chocolate stick 22&24 

Mott's Confec Chocolate 22c- 40 

Mott's Sweet Choc. Liquors 21c— 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE GO. 

Cocoas- 
Hygienic, 1, J, J lb. boxes 70 75 

Iceland Moss 54lb in 12lbbxes... 35 

Soluble (bulk) 15 & SO lb bxs .... 18 20 

Soluble(tins)6 1bandl2lb.... 20 

Cocoa Nibs, any quantity 30 35 

Cocoa Shells, any quantity 05 

Cocr a Essence per doz 1 40 

Chocolates- 
Mexican. V4,V4inl01bbxs 30 
Queen s Dessert, " 40 
Vanilla " 35 
Sweet Caracas " 32 
Chocolate Powder, 15, 30 lb bxs 25 
Chocolate Sticks, per gross.. 00 
Pure Caracas (plain) V % lbs 40 
Koyal Navy (sweet) " 30 
Confectioners' in 10 lb cakes SO 
Chocolate Creams, in 3 lb bxs 30 
Chocolate Parisien. in 6 lb bxs SO 

WALTER, BAKER & COS 

Chocolate— 
Pre'uiuNo. 1, bxsl2 & 25 lbs each 45 
Baker's Vanilla in bxs 12 lbs each 55 
Caraccas Sweet bxs 6 lbs each, 12 

oxs in case 40 

Best Sweet in bxs, 6 lbs. each, 13 

boxes in case 30 

Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 bxs 

incase, per box... 4 00 



German Sweet Chocolate- 
Grocers' Style, in cases 12 boxes, 

12 lbs each 30 

Grocers' Style, in cases 24 boxes, 6 

lbs each SO 

48 Fingers to the 1 b. , in cases 12 bxs 

12 lbs each 30 

48F'ngersto the lb.,incases24 bxs 

fi lbs each SO 

8 Cakes to the lb., in cases, 21 bxs 

6 lbs. each 32 

Soluble Chocolate- 
In canisters, I lb., 4lb., and 10 lb. 56 

Cocoa — 
Pure Prepared, bxes, 12 lbs each 42 
Cracked, in bxs. 12 lbs., each, J lb. 

papers 35 

Cracked, in bags, 6, 10 and 25 lbs. 

each SO 

Breakfast Cocoa— 
Irbxs 6 & 12 lbs., each, Jib., «,ins 48 
In boxes, 12 lbs., each, lib tins, 

decorated canisters 50 

Cocoa Shells, 12's and 25's 10 

Broma — 
In boxes, 12 lbs., each, J lb. tins... 45 



.Pirated, e.ret" 1 -' 



" Highland Brand 

Evaporated 

Cream, per 

case 7 25 

4 doz. 1 lb tinr. 



CLOTHES PINS. 

5 gross, per box 75 

4 gross, " 85 

6 gross, " 1 20 

chas. bceckr & sons, per box 

5 gross, single &10box lots 75 80 

Star, 4 doz. in package 85 

" 6 " " 1 35 

" 4 ' cotton bagB 90 

COFFEE. 

green o. per lb 

Mocha 28, S3 

Old Government Java 25,35 

Rio 20 22 

Plantation Ceylon 29,31 

Porto Rico 24,28 

Guatemala 24, 26 

Jamaica 22, 23 

Maracaibo 24, 2€ 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL lb CO.' 8 

Excelsior Blend 34 

OurOwn " 32 

Jersey •' 30 

Laguayra " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 30 

Santos 27 28 



RECKITT'S Blue and Black Lead ("— 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



JAM 



We have an immense stock of pure 
Jams and Jellies, put up in Glass Jars 
and 5 lb. and 1 lb. Tins, and in 1 4 lb. and 
28 lb. pails. These goods are as fine 



and pure as the best imported. A trial will convince. 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFECTIONERY CO., 



Tel. 528. 



7 Front St. East, Toronto. 



Price* current, continued — 

J. W. COWAN <fe CO. 

Standard Java in sealed tins, 

85 and 50 lbs 80 

Standard Imperial in sealed 

tins, 85 and 50 lbs 38 

Standard Blend in sealed tins, 

85and50 1bs S3 

Ground, in tins, 5, 10, 15 and 

85 lbs 80 36 

Say's Parisien, in H and lb tins 30 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum lb $0 08 $0 03 

Bine Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstone ...» 03 03} 

Borax 12 14 

Camphor 65 75 

Carbolic Acid 30 50 

Castor Oil 07} 08 

Cream Tartar 28 SO 

Epsom Salts 01} 08 

ParisGreen 16 17 

Extract Logwood, bulk 13 14 

" " boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 13 

Glycerine, per lb 17 20 

Hellebore 16 17 

Iodine ..-. 5 50 6 00 

Insect Powder 30 35 

Salpetre 08} 09 

Boda Bicarb, per keg 8 50 8 75 

Sal Soda 100 126 

Madder 12} .... 



DURABLE PAILS AND TUBS 

WM. CANE & SONS, MANUFACTURING CO 



8 8} 
81 81 
5 6} 
11 11} 
11 12 
15 16 
4} 5J 
8i 84 



Currants, Patras, bbls 5? 

" } bbls 6 

" " cases 7 7} 

" Vo3tizzas, cases... 7} 9 

" " } cases 8/, 10 

" 5-crown Excelsior 

(cases) 

" }case 

Dates, Persian, boxes, 

Figs, Elemes, 14oz., per box 

" 10 1b boxes 

" 80 lb bxs. 7 crown 

Prunes, Bosnia, casks 

" " cases, new. 

Raisins, Valencia, offs talk 

old 3 41 

Selected 1 U 

Layers 7} 8J 

Raisins, Sultanas 7} 8 

" Eleme 

' Malaga : 

London layers 

Loose muscatels 

Imperial cabinets 

Connoisseur clusters ... 4 

Extra dessert ■■ 5 

" " ' qrs. . 

Royal clusters 

Fancy Veea boxes 

Black baskets 3 

•' •' qrs 

Blue " 

Find Dehesas 

" " qrs 

Lemons 5 00 6 00 

Oranges, Jamaica 8 00 

" Valencias 

" Mesninas ..— 

" Seedlings 

" Navels 



Oats, No 2, per 34 lbs .... 31 32 

Barley, No 1 per 48 lbs.. 49 50 

" No 2 extra 43 46 

" No 3 " 38 39 

Rye 59 60 

Peas 58 60 

Corn 56 57 



00 4 50 
00 5 25 



60 3 80 



NEWMARKET, 

Per doz. 

Steel hoops, painted and grain'd 2 20 

Brass hoops, oiled and varnish. 3 25 

Noltubs 9 50 

No2 " 8 50 

No 3 " 7 50 



DOMESTIC 

Apples, Dried, per lb., 
do Evaporated... 



EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold, No. 8, p. doz . $0 75 

' 1,1} oz... 1 25 

" " " " 2,8 oz 1 75 

" " " " 3, 3 0Z.... 8 00 

(BEELT'S FLAVOBING) per doz 

Concentrated, 8 oz. full measure 1 75 

" 4oz. " " 3 00 

In Lemon, Vanilla and Assorted 

Flavors. Less 10 per cent, discount 

n gross quantities or more. 

FLUID BEEF. 



FISH. 

Oysters, per gallon 

" seleot, per gallon 

Pickerel per lb 

Pike do 

White fish do 

Manitoba White fish do 

Salmon Trout do 

Lake herring p. 100 

Pickled and Salt Fish : 
Labrador herring, p.bbl 

Shore herring " 

Salmon trout, per } bbl 
White Fish, } bbl 

Dried Fish : 

Codfish, per quintal 

" cases 

Boneless fish per lb 

Boneless cod " 

Smoked Fish: 
Finnan Haddies. per lb 

Bloaters per box 

Digby herring " 



HAT & STRAW. 

Hay, Pressed, "on track 9 00 

Straw Pressed," .... 6 CO 6 50 



HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 

Cot Nails, from Toronto 

2 25 2 50 50 to 60 dy basis 2 30 

........ 40 dy 2 35 

30 dy 2 40 

20, 16andl2dy 2 45 

lOdy 2 50 

8and9dy 2 55 

6and7dy 2 70 

5dy 2 90 

4dy AP 2 90 

3dy AP 3 30 

4dyCP 2 80 

3dyCP 3 V) 

Horse Nails: 

"C" 60 and 5 per oent. from list. 
Horse Shoes: 

From Toronto, per keg 3 65 

Screws: Wood- 
Flat head iron 77} p.e. dis 
Round " " 72} p.c. dis. 
Flat head brass 75 p.c. dis 
Round head brass 70 p c. 

Window Glass : [To find out what 
break any required size of pano comes 
under, aud its length and breadth to- 
gether. Thus in a 7x9 pane the 
length and breadth oome to 16 
inches; which shows it to be a first- 
break glass, i.e., not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in and under) 1 35 

2nd " (26 to 40 inches) 155 

3rd " (41 to 50 " ) 3 40 

4th " (51 to 60 " ) 3 70 

5th " (61 to 70 " 4 00 

Rope : Manilla 11} 

Sisal 09} 

New Zealand 08} 



04} 05 
07} 08 



1 50 



1 25 

6 06 
07 
07 

6 07 

2 50 



6 00 6 25 

5 00 

5 00 5 50 

5 50 5 75 



5 25 
5 00 



JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL 

per doz 

Oases, No. 1,8 oztins .... $2 75 $3 00 Sea Fish : Haddockper lb 

" No. 8, 4 oztins.... 4 50 5 00 Cod " 

" No. 3, 8 oztins 8 00 8 75 B.C. salmon " 

" No. 4, 1 lb tins.... 18 60 14 25 Market Cod " 

No. 5. 8 lb tins.... 85 00 27 0b Frozen Sea Herrings 



5 75 
5 50 
04} 
08 



07} 08} 

1 00 2 25 
20 



05 
07} 
15 



FRUITS. 

FOREIGN. 

o. per Ik 

Currants, Provincial, bbls. ... 5} 

" " } bbls ... 6 

" Filiatras. bbls 5i 

" " }bblf... 6 t\ 



GRAIN . 



Axes : Per box, $6 to $12. 

Shot : Canadian, dis. 12} per oent. 

Hinges: Heavy T and strap .. .04} 05 
" Screw, hook & strap. 03} 04i 

White Lead: Pure Ass'n guarantee 
ground in oil. 

25 lb. irons per lb 4 4V4 

No.l " ... 5 

No.8 " .. 4H 

No. 3 " .. 4 

Turpentine Selected packages, per 
gal .... 50 

Linseed Oil per gal, raw 56} o 57} 
Boiled, per gal 59} £0} 

Glue: Common, per lb.... 10 11 



Wheat,Fall,NoZ, 66 67 INDURATED FIBRE WARE. 

" Red Winter, No 8 «5 66 

Wheat, Spring, No 2 64 65 }pail,6qt $4 00 

" Man Hard, No 1.. 91 92 Star Standard, 12 qt 4 50 

" il No2.. 84 85 Milk, 14 qt 5 50 

1 ' No. 3... 77 77} Round bottomed fire pail, 14 qt. 6 50 



Tubs, No. 1 r. 15 50 

" 8 13 25 

„ " 3 11 00 

Nests of 3 340 

Eeelers No. 1 10 00 

2 9 00 

3 8 00 

.,, ' 4 7 00 

Milk pans 3 25 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 3 25 

" round " 3 50 

Handy dish 3 75 

Water Closet Tanks 18 00 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

DELHI CANNING CO 

Jams assorted, extra fine, l's . 2 35 
Jellies, extra fine l's 2 25 

TORONTO BI8CDTT &CONFECT10NEBY CO 

Per lb 
Jams, absolutely pure— apple... $0 06 

Family 07 

Black and Red currant. Rasp- 
berry, Strawberry, Peach 

and Gooseberry per lb 18 

Plum 10 

Jellies— pure— all kinds 10 

These goods are put up in 
glass jwirs and in 5, and 10 
lb. tins and 28 lb. pails. 
Marmalade— orange 12 

KNIFE POLISH. 

NIXEY'S 

"Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

6d London 5s., Canada, $2 00 

"Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

Is London 10s„ Canada, $4 00 

LICORICE. 

YOONG & SMYLIE'S LIST. 

5 lb boxes, wood or paper, per lb 40 
Fancy bxs. (36 or 50 sticks), per 

box 1 25 1 25 

'• Ringed" 5 lb boxes, per lb 40 

" Acme" Pellets, 51b cans, per 

can 2 00 

"Acme" Pellets, Fanoy boxes 

(30s) per box 150 

" Acme " Pellets, Fancy paper 

boxes, per box (40s) 1 25 

Tar Licorice and ToluWafers, 5 

lb cans per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb glass 

jars 1 75 

Licorice Lozenges 5 lb cans... 1 50 
Purity" Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 
100 " . 72} 
Imitation Calabria, 5 lb bxs 

plb 25 

MINCE MEAT. 

J. H. WETHEY'S — ST.OATHARINES 

Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

ELLIS & EEIQHLEY'S. CtS 

Durham, Fine, in land } lb tins 

perlb 25 

" Fine, in 1 lb jars 22 

" Fine, in 4 lb jars 70 

" Ex Sup., in bulk, per lb 80 

' Superior in bulk, p. lb 20 

Fine, " r> 16 

• Cherry's Ibish 

Pure in lib. tins 40 

Pure in * lb. tins 48 

Pure in I lb. tins 44 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Prices current, continued. 

NUTS, per lb 

Almonds, Ivioa 13 14 

" Tarragona 15} 16 

■• Fomigetta IS 14 

Almonds. Shelled Valencias 28 32 

Jordan. 40 45 

» " Canary ... 88 30 

Brazil " l|i 

Coooanuts, 5 , ° 

Filberts, Sioily 9i 1° 

PGGftQB .,»•••••••• ••• H *" 

Peanuts, roasted 10 12 

" green 9 1" 

Walnuts, Grenoble 15 16 

" Bordeaux 10 11 

" Naples, cases 

" Marbots 12} 13 

•' Chilis 12 13 

PETROLEUM. 

to 10 bbl lots, Toronto... Imp.gai 

Canadian* 14 $0 15 

CaroonSafety 17 18 

Canadian Water White 20 23 

Amer'n Prime White 23 

" Water White.. 24 25 

Photogene 27 00 

(For prices at Petrolia, see Market 
Report.) 

PICKLES «ft SAUCES. 

THE T. A. SNIDEB PBEoEBVE CO., 
CINCINNATI. 

(Wright & Copp, Toronto, Agents,) 
per doz 

Home Made Tomato Catsup, qts 6 00 

" " •' pts 3 50 

" " % pts 2 00 

Chili Sauce pts 4 50 

" H pts 3 25 

Soups (in 3 lb cans). 

Tomato 3 50 

Fancy— Chicken, Mock Turtle. 
Cream ol Corn Pea, Celery, 

Asparagus 4 50 

Fancy — Chicken Gumbo, Or 
Tail, Consomme Bouillon, 
Mulligatawny, Mutton Broth, 
Beef. Pea, Printanir, Julienne 
Vermicelli, Vegetable 4 25 



LEA & pebbin's. per doi 
Worcester Sauce, 4 pts.. $3 60 »S 76 
" " pints 6 25 6 50 

Lazenby & SONS Per doz 

Piokles, all kinds, pints 3 25 

" " quarts 6 00 

Harvey Sauoe-genuine— hlf. pts 3 25 
Mushroom Catsup " 2 25 

Anchovy Sauce " " 3 25 

PRODUCE. 

dairy. Per b 

Butter, creamery, tubs. »0 21 $0 23 

" dairy, tubs, choice 16 20 

■• " medium 14 16 

" low grades to com 12 13 

Butter, pound rolls — 19 2C 

" large rolls 17 

" store crocks 17 

Cheese 11 

OOUNTBY 

Eggs, fresh, per doz 18 

" limed 16 

Beans 1 15 1 30 

Onions, per bbl 175 2 25 

Potatoes, per bag 60 70 

Hops, 1891crop 13 15 

" 1892 " 16 18", 

Honey, extracted 05 07 

" section 18 14 



PROVISIONS. 

Bacon , long clear, p lb 08i 

Pork, mess, p. bbl 16 50 

" shortcut 17 50 18 00 

Hams, smoked, per lb... 11} 12 

" pickled 11 

Bellies 12 12K 

Rolls 09} 

Backs 11} 12 

Lard, Canadian, per lb 10} 

Compound 08 08} 

Tallow, refined, per lb.. 05 05} 

" rough, " 02 



RICE, ETC. 



Per lb 



Bice, Aracan 33 4 

Patna 4} 5} 

Japan 5 6 

extra Burmah 3 J 4 

Java extra 6} 7 

Genuine Old Carolina .... 9} 10 



Grand Duke 6} 7i 

Sago 4% 5} 

Tapioca 5 5} 

ROOT BEER. 

Hire's (Liquid) per doz $2 00 

SPICES. 

ground Per lb. 

Pepper, black, pure $0 12}$0 15 

" fine to superior 10 18 

*' white, pure 20 28 

" fine to choice 20 85 

Ginger, Jamaica, pure 25 27 

" African, " 18 

Cassia, flue to pure 18 25 

Cloves, " " 14 85 

Allspice, choice to pure 12 15 

Cayenne, " " 30 35 

Nutmegs, " " 75 1 20 

Mace, " " .... 1 00 1 85 

Mixed Spice, choice to pure. 30 35 

Cream of Tartar, fine to pure 25 37 

STARCH. 

BBITISH AMEBICA STARCH CO 
BRANTFOBD. 

1st quality white, in kegs and brls 4J 

1st quality white, 3 lb. cartoons,. 5i 

Lily White gloss, crates 6} 

Brantford gloss, 1 lb 7 J 

Lily White gloss, 1 lb chromo.... 6f 

Canada Laundry, Boxes 4} 

Pure Prepared corn 74 

Challenge Corn 6j 

Rice Starch, fancy cartoons 8} 

" oubes 7$ 

KINQSFORDS OSWEGO STARCH. 

Pure 8tarch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4 lb pack'g's 8 

36-lb " 3 lb. packages 8 

18-lb " 8} 

38 to 45-lb boxes 8 

Sllvar Gloss Starch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4"lb. pack'g's 9 

40-lb •' } lb. package 9} 

40-lb " Jib. " 10 

40-lb " assorted } and 1 lbs. 9} 

6-lb " sliding covers 9} 

38 to 45 lb boxes 9 



SI 



Oswego Corn Starch— for Puddings 
Custards, etc.— 

40-lb boxes, 1 lb packages 

80-lb " " 

ST. LAWRENCE STARCH 00. 'B 

Culinary Starches— 

St. Lawrence corn starch 7 

Durham corn starch 6} 

Laundry Starches- 
No. 1, White, 4 lb. Cartons 4] 

" " Bbls 4$ 

" " Kegs 4| 

Canada Laundry 3} 

Ivory Gloss, six 6 lb.bozes, slid- 
ing covers 6} 

Ivory Gloss, fancy picture, lib 

packs 6J 

Patent Starch, fancy picture, 1 

lb. cartons 6) 

Ivorine Starch in cases of 40 
packages $3 00 



SUGAR. 



c. 



Granulated 

Paris Lump, bbls and 100 lb.bxs 

" " 501b. boxes 

Extra Ground, bbls 

" " less than a bbl 

Powdered, bbls 

" less than a bbl 

Extra bright re ti ned 

Bright Yellow 

Medium " 

Brown 



per 
41 

5 
Si 



SALT. 

Bbl salt, car lots 180 

Coarse, car lots, F.O.B 70 

" small lots 85 90 

Dairy, car lots, F O.B 185 

" small lots 150 

" quarter-sacks 45 50 

Common, fine car lots 80 

" small lots 95 1 00 

Bock salt, per ton 15 00 

Liverpool coarse 75 80 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

Per lb. 
bbls. } bbls 
8 



STROPS. 



2i 2} 
2} 3J 



W. G. A. LAMBE & CO., 

GROCERY BROKERS 
TORONTO. 



GENTS FOR 



The St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co., 

MONTREAL. 

JOHNSTON'S FLUIB BEEF. 

The Great 




Strength-giver. 

The most perfect form of Goncentrated 
Nourishment. 

STIMULATING. STRENGTHENING. INVIGORATING. 



Kingsford's Oswego 

STARCH. 



STRONCEST. PUREST. 



BEST. 



"THE ORIGINAL" 



"Silver Gloss" 

(Others so-called are imita- 
tions of our brand.) 

Pure Starch. 



FOR THE TABLE. 

Kingsford's 
Corn Starch. 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING 
JOBBERS IN CANADA. 



T. KINGSFORD & SON 



OSWEGO, N.T. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 




PURE CALABRIA " Y. & S." LICORICE, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16s to pound. 
"ACME" LICORICE PELLETS, In 5-pound Tin Cans. 

TAR, LICORICE and TOLU WAFERS, in 5-pound Tin Cans. 

LICORICE "Y. & S." LOZENGES, In 5-pound Tin Cans and 5-pound Glass Jars. 
"PURITY," PURE PENNY-LICORICE, 100 and 200 Sticks in a Box. 



Manufactured 



E f x a ct u si e v d e, y by YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



K^*Where did you see this advertisement ? 



BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. 



Pricei current, continued— 



V.B 

E.V.B 

E. Superior . 

XX 

XXX 



2f 3 

2| 21 

^ 2| 

2| 2| 

2t 3 

Crowu .'.'.'..'.'.......... 3 3J 

molasses. Per gal 

Trinidad, in puncheons.... 35 37 

bbU 38 46 

}bbls 40 40 

New Orleans, in bbls 30 52 

Porto Rico, hdds 38 40 

" barrels 42 44 

J barrels 44 46 

SOAP. 

Ivory Bar, 1 lb. bars per lb 5} 

Do. 2, 6-16 and 3 lb bars " 5 

Primrose,4} lb bars, wax W " 4} 

" 1 *l 

John A, cake, wax W.perdoz 42 
Mayflower, cake, " " 42 

Gem, 3lb bars per lb 3* 

■■ 13 oz, 1 and 2 lb. bars 3f 

Queen's Laundry, per bar 51 

Pride of Kitchen, per box 2 75 

Sunshine, boxes, 100 tablets 6 50 

" 50 '• 3 40 

mobse's soaps. Per lb 

Mikado (wrapped) 04* 

Eclipse a 043 

Stanley Bar 04j 



Defiance . 

Toronto. 12 oz Perdoa 

Ruby, 10 oz " 

Monster, 8 oz " 

Detroit, 14 oz " 

Lily White 

Everyday " 

Queen City, 14 oz. 



04} 
50 
30 
24 
48 
90 
80 
78 
Per box 

Mottled in 5 box lots, 100 bars... 5 00 
" " " 60 bars... 3 00 

Floater (boxes free) 6 50 

Electric 2 75 

Hard Water Electric 2 50 

Royal Laundry 3 25 

Octagon 4 00 

Per doz 

Royal Magnum 25 

" " 25 doz per box. 20 

Anchor, Assorted 10 

" Castile 50 

Morse's Assorted , 45 

Morse's Rose 45 

" Windsor u 45 

• Castile 45 

Bouquet, paper and wood 80 

Prize Magnum, White Castile . 72 

" " Honey 72 

" Glycerine 72 

" Oatmeal 72 

Per box 
" ' Honeysuckle ... 72 

Sweet Briar 85 

Extra Perfume 55 

Old Brown Windsor Squares .. 30 

White Lavender 1 00 

Per doz 

White Castile Bars 85 

White Oatmeal 85 

Persian Boquet, paper 2 50 

Oriental 45 

Pure Coooanut, 3 doz. bxs, wood 40 

Heliotrope paper 1 50 

Carnation 60 

Rose Boquet 60 

Coooa Castile 40 

Arcadian 45 

New Arcadian, per gross 4 25 

Ocean Boquet 45 

Barber's Bar, per lb 25 

Pure Bath 1 00 

Magnolia 1 20 

Oatmeal 85 



Unscented Glycerine 90 

Grey Oatmeal 60 

Plain Honey 70 

Plain Glycerine C 70 

Plain Windsor 70 

Fine Bouquet 100 

Morse's Toilet Balls <> 90 

Turkish Bath 60 

Infants' Delight 1 20 

TEAS. 

CHINA GREENS 

Gunpowder— per lb 

XBases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 
Young Hyson — 

Cases, sifted, extra firsts ... 42 50 

Cases, small leaf, firsts 35 40 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 

" " seconds 17 19 

thirds 15 17 

" common 11 14 

PINO 8UEY8. 

Young Hyson — 

Half chests, firsts 20 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

JAPAN. 

Half Chests- 
Choicest 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 12} 15 

Nagasaki, } chests Pekoe... 16 22 

" " Oolong 14 15 

" Gunpowder 16 19 

" " Sittings .... 5 9 
Congou — BLACK. 
Half Chests, Eaisow, Mon- 

ing, Pakling 12 60 

Caddies, Pakhng, Kaisow... 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong is 30 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 4o 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

British Consols, 4's ; bright twist, 

5's ; Twin Gold Bar, 8's 67c 

Ingots, rough and readv, 8's 64 

Laurel, 3's 57 

Brier, 7'fl 55 

Index, 7's 50 

HoneysuckIe,7's 58 

Napoleon, 8's 54 

Royal Arms, 12's 65 

Victoria, 12's 53 

Brunette, 12's 501 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 51} 

" in 40 lb boxes 51 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T & 

B, 3's 60 

Lily, 7's 55 

Diamond Solace, 12's 50 

Mvrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb tins 70 

J lb pg, 6 lb boxes TO 

oz pg, 51b boxes 70 

EMPIRE TOBACCO COMPANY. 
CUT SMOKING. 

-Golden Plug, 2 oz. pkg boxes, 5 

lbs 65 

Uncle Ned, 2 oz. pkg, bxs 5 lbs 60 

Gem, 2 oz, packages, 5 lb boxes 61 

Gem, 8 oz tins in 6 lb cases 70 



PLUG SMOKING, 

Golden Plug 56 

Uncle John, 3x6, 3s. caddies 

16} lbs 54 

Gem. 3x6, 3s. caddies 16} lbs.... 53 
St. Lawrence, 2 x 3, 7s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 51 

Banner, 2x3, 7s. caddies about 

17lbs 48 

Sterlng, 2 x 3, 7s. caddies about 

17 lbs 46 

Louise, Solace, 12s.caddies about 

16 lbs 46 

Florence, Solace, 12s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 42 

Hawthorne, 8s. butts 23 lbs 47 

Something Good, 6s. butts 21 lbs 46} 

FANCY SWEET CHEWING. 

Good Luck, spun roll, 16 boxes 

4 lbs 65 

Empire, 3x6, 4s. spaced 8s. bxs 

41bs 61 

Top, 16 oz. spaced 8s. boxes 4 lbs 60 

Joy, 3 x 12s., 14} oz. Spaced 6s. 

Rough and ready. Butts 25 lbs 52 
Judge, I x 3, 83. Flat. Caddies 

about 20} lbs 50 

Currency, 3 x 3, 7s. Rough and 

ready. Caddies about 21 lbs. 49 
Kentucky, 1} x 3, 13s. Caddies 

about211bs 50 

Kentucky, 11 x 3, 7s. Caddies 

about21} lbs 49 

BLACK SWEET CHEWING. 

Star, Narrow, 12s. Butts about 

22 lbs 47 

Morning Star, 12s. Butts about 

22} lbs 43} 

Montreal Twist, 12s. Caddies 

about 23 lbs 44 

AnchorTwist,12s. Caddies about 

23 lbs... 42} 

cigars— s. davis <fe sons, Montreal. 

Sizes. Per M 

Madre E' Hijo, Lord Landsdow$60 00 

" Panetelas 60 00 

" Bouquet 60 00 

' " Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow 85 00 

" Reina Victoria 80 00 

" " Pins 65 00 

E 1 Padre, Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Vict., Especial.. 50 00 

" Conchas de Regalia ... 50 00 

" Bouquet 55 00 

Pine 50 00 

" Longfellow 80 00 

■ ' Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo, Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas 30 00 

Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes, all Tobacco- 
Cable 7 00 

El Padre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

CIGARETTES. Per M- 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 00 

B.C.No.l 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 50 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

cut tobaccos. per lb 

Puritan, tenths, 5 lb. boxes 74 

Old Chum, ninths, 5 1b box 71 

Old Virgin., 1-10 lbpkg, 10 lbbxs 62 
Gold Block, ninths, 5 lb boxes. 73 



cigarette tobacco. 

B. C.N.I, 1-10, 5 lb boxes 

Puritan, 1-10, 5 lb boxes R5 

Athlete, per lb 1 ]5 

Hyde Park 10 5o 

VINEGAR. 

A. HAAZ & CO 

XX, W.W 20 

XXX, WW 5 

Honey Dew 30 

Pickling 30 

Malting — 

WOODENWARE. per doz 

Pails, 2 hoop, clear Nr 1... $1 70 

" 3 " •' 1 90 

Pails, 2hoops, clear No. 2.. 160 

" 3 " " " .. 1 80 

" 3 " painted... " ... 1 80 

Tubs, No. 950 

1 8 00 

2 7 00 

3 6 00 

Washboards, Globe $1 90 2 00 

" Water Witch .... 1 40 

Northern Queen 2 25 

" Planet 1 70 

" Waverly 1 60 

XX 1 50 

X 1 30 

" Single Crescent... 1 85 

'• Double " ... 2 75 

" Jubilee 2 25 

" Glob.' Improved. 1 90 

" Quick and Easy . 1 80 

World 1 75 

" Rattler 1 30 

per case. 
Matches, 5 case lots, single cases 

Parlor 1 60 $1 65 

Telephone ... 3 60 3 70 

Telegraph .... 3 80 3 90 

Safety 4 20 4 30 

French 3 60 3 75 

Railroad (10 gro. in case) 

Single case and under 5 cs. $3 70 

5 cases and under 10 cases ... 3 60 

Steamship (10 gro. in case) 

Single case and under 5 cs. 3 50 

5 cases and under 10 cases... 3 40 

per doz 

Mops and Handles, comb. 125 

Butter tubs $1 60 $3 20 

Butter Bowls, crates ast'd 3 60 



■ 



WASHING 
COMPOUND. 

Housekeeper's Quick- 
Washing per case. 
5c pkgs 100 in case ... 3 50 
10c '" 60 in case ... 4 00 



PEERLESS WASHING COMPOUND. 

per case 
\i lb packages, 12 doz in case ... $4 50 
Vi " 6 "... 3 90 

1 lb " 3 " .. 3 60 

5 cts " 100 " . . 3 50 

YEAST. 

barm mfg. co. per box 

1 box containing 2 doz. 5c. pkgs. 50 
1 " "2 doz. 10c. " 1 00 



breadmaker's 

per box 
5c packages 36 in box 1 00 
2c " 45 in box 60 




40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



T IB! IE 



ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING GO'S 

GRANULATED 

AND YELLOWS 

AND 8YRUP8 

ARE PURE 

Material whatsoever is used in the manufacture of 



THE CANADA SUGAR REFINING GO'Y [limited], 

MONTBEAL. 
Manufacturers of Refined Sugars of the well-known Brand 




Of the Highest Quality and Purity, made by the Latest Processes, and the Newest 
and Best Machinery, not Surpassed Anywhere. 

Lump Sugar, in 50 and 100 lb. boxes. 

"Crown" Granulated, Special Brand, the finest which can be made 

Extra Granulated, very Superior Quality. 

"Cream" Sugars, (not dried.) 

YellOW Sugars of all Grades and Standards. 

Syrups of all Grades in Barrels and Half Barrels. 

Sole Makers of high class Syrups in tins, 2 lb. and 8 lb. each. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Travellers 9 Guide. 

- The Alberta Hotel - 



CALGARY, N.W.T. 



Strictly first-class. Headquarters for Con-mercial 
Ken. Large sample rooms. 

H. A. PERLEY, Prop. 

The Hiliiard House 

RAT PORTAGE, ONT. 



Strictly first-class. The favorite commercial 
house along the line of C P. R 

LOUIS H1LLIARD, Prop. 

THE LELAND HOUSE, 

Portage La Prairie, Man. 

Best sample rooms west of Winnipeg. Strictly 
first-class. 

WM. NEVINS, Prop. 

Grand Pacific Hotel 

KAMLOOPS, B.C. 



The leading hotel in the city. Sample rooms 
-convenient to stores, provided for commercial 
men 

H. SMITH, Proprietor. 

The Hotel Wilson. 

NANAIMO, B. C. 

The largest and best Hotel in the city. 

JOS. RICHARDS, 

Proprietor. 

PURE CONFECTIONERY, 

FINEST BISCUITS. 

Manufactured by 

J. McLAUGHLAN & SONS, 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 






m^ 



Posters, 
Circulars, | 
Business 
Cards. 



£ 



&t 



Printers 

54- YongeSt. - Toronto 






Prices 

Right 

Telephone 

1785 







BUY THE BEST. 

SEELY'S 

Celebrated 
Flavoring 
Extracts. 

VANILLA, LEMON, 

and Assorted Flavors. 
Standard Goods of Am- 
erica (established in 
1862). Once tried, al- 
ways used. 

Seel) Manufacturing Co, 

Detroit, Mich. - Windsor, Ont. 



Wholesalers 

And 

Manufacturers 

When 

Considering 

Appropriation 

For 

Advertising 

For 

1893 

Remember 

THE 

CANADIAN GROCER 



THE RIPANS TABULES regulate the stomach, 
liver and bowels, purify the blood, are pleas- 
aut to take, Bale and always effectual. A reliable 
remedy for Biliousness, Blotches on the Face, 
Bright^ Disease, Catarrh, Colic, Constipation, 
Chronic Diarrhoea, Chronic Liver Trouble, Dia- 
betes, Disordered Stomach, Dizziness, Dysentery, 
Dyspepsia, Eczema, Flatulence. Female Com- 

Jlaints, Foul Breath, Headache, Heartburn, Hives, 
aundice. Kidney Complaints, Liver Troubles, 
Loss of Appetite, Mental Depression, Nausea, 
— Painful Diges- 
Rushof Blood 
Sallow Com- 
Kheum, Scald 
ula,Sick Head- 
eases,Sour 
Feeling.Torpid 
Water Brash 
er symptom 
results from 
impure blood or a failure in the proper perform- 
ance of their functions by the stomach, liver and 
intestines. Persons given to over-eating are ben- 
efited by taking one tabule after each meal. A 
continued use or the Ripans Tabules is the surest 
cure for obstinate constipation. They contain 
nothing that can be injurious to the most deli- 
cate. 1 gross *2, 1-2 gross $1.25, 1-4 gross 75c., 
1-24 gross 15 cents. Sent by mail postage paid. 
Address THE RIPANS CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
P. O Box 672. New York. 




THE 



OakYille Basket Co., 



MANUFACTURERS OP 




I, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets. 
1, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
I, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For sale by all Woodenware Dealer 



Oakville, Ont. 



DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 






TRY 



lilt' 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE& SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT., 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly fall off. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE. 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



, »- ORDER 

-IVORY BAR 
SOAP 



OLD CHUM 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PLUG AND CUT 





o 
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Retailing 
Godfisb. 



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H.W.NOBTHBUPiCO. 



St. John, N. B. 



JOHN PETERS & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 
and Brokers, 

Halifax, N. S. and 
Kingston, Jamaica, W.I. 

Agents for The £. B. EDDY MEG CO., 
HULL, P. a. 



We are open to accept one or two more Agen- 
cies of first-class houses, either at Halifax or 
Kingston. We have a good connection and 
splendid storage facilities. 

References: The Merchants Bank of Halifax. 
The E. B. Eddy Agencies. Mfg Co., Hull.P.Q. 
The Mercantile Agencies. 



Tea Caddies all Sizes 

SPICE, BAKING POWDER AND TOBACCO TINS. 

AND TIN SIGNS, 

LITHOGRAPHED OR JAPANNED. 

Write our nearest house for Catalogue and Prices 

THE NPCLARY M'FC COMPANY, 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 




HANGING BANQUET 




THE PEOPLE . . . 
ARE AWAKENING 
TO THE FACT . . 
THAT THE BEST 




LAMP IN THE 
WORLD IS . . 



THE 



jD lffSBURC 



VASE PIANO 

• • 
Write for Catalogue 



Although the Sales 
of this Lamp in the 
past year has been 
Enormous the out- 
look for this year 
is still better . . . 

(Jowams, Kent * (o, 

Sole Wholesale Agents 
for Canada 

TORONTO and WINNIPEG 




TORONTO SALT WORKS, 

128 Adelaide E., Toronto, 

8ole CI t y Agentsf or the "Canada 8»lt Association' 



Dealers in all kinds of Table, Dairy, Moat Cur- 
ing, Barrel and Land Salts. 

The "Acme " Table Salt (new process) will not 
get damp or hard. 

Two Silver Medals, at Industrial Exhibition, 
Toronto, 1890, for our "Acme" Table Salt and 
our "Star Brand" Dairy Salt. 



Florida Oranges, 
Almeria Grapes, 

Lemons, Cranberries, 
Nuts of all kinds, 

Figs and Dates. 

DAWSON & CO., 

32 WEST MARKET ST., 

Telephone 1471- TORONTO. 

Consignments of Produce Solicited. 

IT AC SIMILB OF PACKAGE. 




S...i£8 Adelaide 5t.[ast.. 




WILL 

NOT 
CET 
|# 





Brantford 

and 

Pelee Island 



J. 8. HAMILTON & 00% 

Bbantfobd, Ont 
Sole Agents for Canada. 



The pure INDIAN TEA of 

KEMBLE & CO., 

Calcutta, India, 

Is "Second to None" for Purity, Strength, 
and Flavor. TRY IT. 

A. DAVIDSON, Representative 
48 Front St. East, Toronto. 



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HYDE PARK, ATHLETE, PURITAN, DERBY. SWEET SIXTEEN CIGARETTES. 



S. DAVIS & SONS, LARGEST CIGAR MANUFACTURERS IN CANADA 



Published 
weekly- 

200 PER YEAR 




VOL. VII. 



TORONTO, JANUARY 20, 1893. 



NO. 3 





COIMAN'S MUSTARD 



HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 



ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 



TWO- GOLD JVYEDALS 

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EXHIBITION LONDON 1554 

0nty?ri$G^edaLJondon.lS62> kox Only§iWcr>\adal?aris.lS75 
Only >V?dat Dublin. 1S65. W (JrandQold^cdal^oscowlS/^S 



S 

> 

c 
m 



ASK YOUR 
WHOLESALE GROCER 



-FOR- 



RAILROAD AND STEAMSHIP 

MATCHES 



GUARANTEED 
Second to None. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 
56 AND 58 FRONT ST. W. 

TOTIOISTTO. 




MAKE SIMPLY WITH BOILING MILK OR WATER 

FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS. 



DUNNS 
BAKING 
POWDER 

THE COOK'S BEST FRIEND 

Largest Sale in Canada. 



Don bjail to handle 



THE CELEBRATED IMPORTED 

MENIERE 
CHODME 



ANNUAL SALES EXCEED 33 MILLION LBS. 

TD HAVE IT ADVERTISED 
FREE & FREELY 

IN YOUR OWN NAME AMONGST 
YOUB CUSTOMEBS WBITE TO: 

C.ALFRED ChoUILLOU agent Montreal. 



" LA CADENA " and " LA FLORA " The Cream of the Havana Crop. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The McKay Milling Co., Ltd., 

Manufacturers of High Grade Patents, Strong Bakers, 

and Family Flours. 

Q/xjL X JVI ■ ? /-\ I I ■—►"■Granulated. Mid Cut, Fine Cut, Flour Cut and Round Cut. 



WE MAKE THE CELEBRATED 



ROLLED OATS. 



R. £n T. WATSON, Manufacturing Gonfectioners, 

IF you wish to handle the MOST SALABLE 
CONFECTION in the market, try BALA LICO- 
RICE. We are Headquarters for Fine Choco- 
lates, Creams, Swiss Fruits and One Cent Goods, 
Icing Sugar, Cake Ornaments, etc 

SEND ZETOIR PEICE LIST. 



75 Front Street East, 



KOFF NO MORE. 

WATSON'S COUGH DROPS 

Will give positive and instant relief to 
those suffering from Colds, Hoarseness, 
Sore Throat, etc., and are invaluable to- 
Orators and Vocalists. R. & T. W. 
stamped on each drop. Try them. 

TORONTO. 






The Norton Manufacturing Co. 



E P. breckenridge, 

President. 



C. C. Warren, 

Secretary. 
£dwin Norton, W. 0. Breckenridge, 

Vice-Pres. Mgr. & Treas. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



(Tin Cans 

By Automatic Machinery. 

Fruit, Paint, Lard, Baking Powder, Fish, 
and Seamless Lobster 

CANS. 

Capacity, fifty thousand c»ns per day. 
Sole Agents in Canada for Norton Brothers 

" Solder Hemmed" Caps. 

Inquiries and Correspondence Solicited, 

HAMILTON. - ONT. 



PURE GOLD 

Flavoring 
Extracts - 



ALL THE NATURAL FRUIT FLAVORS, 

OF PERFECT PURITY AND GREAT 3TRENCTH. 

VANILLA, LEMON, PRANCE, 

AND OTHER FRUITS. 

Don't take any other, but insist on 
getting 

PURE GOLD GOODS 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Pure Gold Mfg. Co. 

TORONTO. 




L]L JLSif P£ w JlSr- 



iGGESSES 

WO0D ENGRAVING 
PHQTQ ENGRAVING 

ZJNC ENGRAVING 
HALF TONE 

WAX ENGRAVING 

?*-T3CSICNINC> 





We have removed 
to our new premises. 
No. 146 & 148 Car- 
ling St. Call and see 
us when in our City. 

GORMAN, 
ECKERT 
&G0. 

LONDON. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



ABOUT the ist of February we will offer 
to the trade, the largest collection of 
import samples ever shown by any 
house in Canada. The assortment will com- 
prise a great variety of China and Glass, 
both staple and fancy, and buyers will con- 
sult their own interest by looking through 
r our show rooms before placing their orders 
for importation 




James A. Skinner & Co,, 



Also 



54 .and* Wellington TORONTO ^^ST"' 



FRY'S 

CHOCOLATE 

X lb. cakes. 6 lb. Boxes. 

Each cake moulded in lO divisions. 
RED and WHITE WRAPPER. 
The most attractive and best selling sweet Chocolate in the market. 

Pays a good profit. 
For sale by all leading dealers. 

Toronto Office, J. S. FRY & SONS, 43i Wellington St. E. 



"GOLD MEDAL," SWEET. 



An Jpresem/itas 



The use of this product has enabled 
Australian Butter Makes to capture 
the English Butter Market and obtain 
higher prices than is paid for any other 
make of butter — See Editorial Notes 
Canadian Grocer, in issue of Jan. 13. 




OR preservi7ig Milk, Cream, 
Eggs, Meat, Poultry, Game, 
Etc., during the Warmest 
Weather. 



One Agent Dealer In Each District to supply Dairymen 

Consignments of Butter, Gheese, Bacon, ^.^ 

Lard, Eggs, Etc., solicited for the Markets Agent yV^ p £ AGAR, Halifax, IS. S. 

of London, Liverpool, Glasgow and Halifax s x . »• a • *— > m. m. >^» a *, 



-ADAM ^Fl? A C Have advanced and are advancing. hv 

U ill 11 11 ljJlllJ We can offer special values in 

Japan fiibs 12| to 14c. 
in Japan Teas 13 to 15c 

BarbadoeS MolaSSeS Advanced 2c. per gallon. 

we have not changed i Choice Porto Rico in barrels 32c. 

our prices for I Half barrels 34c. 



■ 



Fun supply of DR IED FRUITS c 5KSSN£Jfe 

Lightbound, Ralston & Co., 

Wholesale Grocers, 

MONTREAL, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




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the £ g E Dt>Y Qcs 

batches 

Indurated Fibre Ware, 
Woodenware, 

Washboards, 

TEA, TOILET, TISSUE 

and WRAPPING PAPERS, 



Are sold by all Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Ganada, 
Are recommended by all Users, and 

Are fully guaranteed by the Makers. 



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Toronto Branch: 29 Front St. W. 
Montreal Branch : 318 St. James St. 



MAMMOTH FACTORIES : 



■I! HULL, - CANADA. 



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Published 

WEEKLY- 
COOPER YEAR 




published it) tl?e interest of Grocers, Qai}r;er$, produce agd provision Dealers 

and general Storekeeper^ 



Vol. VII. 



TORONTO. JANUARY 20, 1893. 



No. 3 



J- 8. McLEAN. 

President. 



HUGHC. McLEAN, 

Sec.-Treas 



THEJ. B. McLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

AND 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

HEAD OFFICE : . ■ 10 Front St. E. 

MONTREAL OFFICE : • 146 St. James St. 

E. Desbarats, Manager. 

NEW YORK OFFICE : Room 41, Times Building, 

Roy V. Somervllle, Manager. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH : 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

Advertisers and Subscribers may have their 
correspondence addressed to the care of any of 
our offices and hey are Invited to use them at 
any time. At the Head office. Toronto, a place is 
set apart where they can see all the latest news- 
papers and the latest issues of trade papers from 
all parts of the world, where they can do their 
correspondence or obtain any information. Par- 
cels may also be directed to the Head office. 



The Hon. N. Clarke Wallace takes the 
right way to lit himself for the duties of 
the office of Comptroller of Customs to 
which he nan been appointed. He began 
by announcing his desire to become ac- 
quainted with the views of the merean- 

. tile class in relation to customs duties, 
appraisements,etc. When in Toronto last 
week, many of the leading importers, at 
his own request, waited on him and 
brought before him matters that they 
deemed anomalous or deserving of consid- 
eration with a view to reform. The ques- 
tions discussed affected only the dry 
goods trade, and representatives of that 
trade alone were present at the meeting. 
The following day he went to Hamilton 
to meet the business men of that city and 
to talk over customs matters with them. 

' No subject of direct momeut to grocers 
or general merchants was brought up, 
but some matters important to other 
trades were broache'd, and closer rela- 
tions between the business men of Hamil- 
tn and the customs department were es- 
tablished. It is to be hoped that this de- 
parture of the head of the customs de- 
partment will be regularly followed up. 



If he makes a practice of seeking the 
sense of the business community upon all 
matters vital to the importing trade, he 
will be pretty sure to prove a satisfac- 
tory Comptroller of Customs. Mr. Wal- 
lace's example is worth imitating by the 
chief of the Department of Trade and 
Commerce.of which the Customs is a sub- 
department. Commerce is probably bet- 
ter equipped with organs of opinion than 
any other interest that is under the ad- 
ministration of a department of state. 
Its special press, its Boards of Trade, 
and its business men's associations are 
all media through which its views can 
be ascertained and its wishes consulted. 
There is no need therefore for the Minis- 
ter of Trade and Commerce, or either of 
his under-secretaries at the heads of the 
Customs and Excise Departments, to look 
to his office staff for guidance. Civil ser- 
vants are notoriously attached to old 
routine, and the Minister who shapes his 
course according to their counsels is 
more likely to place the interests of his 
department under an elaborate office sys- 
tem than to effect any reforms for the 
benefit of the citizens concerned. ' That is 
red tapeism, and we are glad to hear 
Mr. Wallace say at the outset that he 
will not add a yard of the red tape that 
already fetters business despatch in the 
Customs Department. In the matter of 
diverse appraisements, the encourage- 
ment of informing by the allowance of a 
moiety of the goods confiscated, the dut- 
ies on samples, etc., there is room for the 
introduction of salutary reform. X and 
Y may buy of the same line of goods 
from the same foreign manufacturer, but 
because X lives at Toronto and Y lives 
at Belleville, Y's goods may cost him 
more, owing to the fact that the ap- 
praiser at his port classifies them dif- 
ferently from the appraiser at Toronto, 
and exacts a higher duty. This differ- 
ence between local appraisers is some- 



times enough to settle which of two mer- 
chants shall command the trade of an 
intermediate district. Also, the fact that 
informers were rewarded with a portion 
of confiscated goods often led greedy but 
mistaken spies to cause a lot of trouble 
by false reports. These things need at- 
tention. Sir John Thompson announced 
at the meeting he addressed in Toronto 
last week, that his Government propos- 
ed to make some changes in the tariff 
during the coming session of Parliament. 
If the changes are made in the light of 
information obtained by Mr. Wallace's 
method, they are not likely to be follow- 
ed by any great incursions of commercial 
deputations to Ottawa praying for modi- 
fications. 

• • • 

The annual report for 1892 of the Am- 
erican Sugar Refineries' Co., (otherwise 
the Sugar Trust), will not have a very 
depressing effect upon that company's 
standing in the stock market. Owing to 
a change which makes the company's 
year end with the 30th November in- 
stead of the 31st December, the report 
covers only the first 11 months of 1892. 
It shows that the net earnings for that 
time were $8,615,837.52. From this semi- 
annual dividend of 4 per cent. on the com- 
mon stock and 3 1-2 per cent, on the pre- 
ferred stock were paid last July, and a 
quarterly dividend of 2 1-2 per cent, on 
the common stock was paid last October. 
Another dividend of $2,206,380 was paid 
on the 3rd January, which leaves $2,- 
732,152.52 of a surplus. A surplus of 
$1,637,822.70 was carried over from 
1891,and this, added to the net residuum 
from 1892, enables the company to add 
to its coffers $4,369,980.22. President 
Havemeyer said : " It is believed that 
but for the scale upon which the busi- 
ness has been done it would be impos- 
sible to furnish refined sugar at the price 
which has prevailed. There has been this 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



other advantage : By reason of the large 
stock of raw sugar which It is necessary 
to carry, the business has been made 
stable and put beyond fluctuations due 
to speculations and other temporary ef- 
fects. An illustration was furnished by 
the cholera alarm which prevailed during 
the latter part of the summer. A serious 
check of Importation was threatened. 
Under ordinary circumstances this was 
likely to have resulted in a large advance 
In the price of raw and a corresponding 
advance in the price of refined. The ju- 
dicious purchase of large quantities of 
raw sugar contributed materially to the 
good showing of the year." 
• • • 

In the last issue of the American Gro- 
cer Editor Barrett gives the statistics 
of the canned goods pack of 1892. As 
our contemporary Is in a position to 
obtain accurate Information upon this 
subject— a subject which it has made its 
own— having for several years publish- 
ed annual statements as to the extent of 
the pack in the United States, its figures 
have come to be regarded as authorita- 
tive. The part of its report that will be 
scanned with most interest by Canadian 
canners is that relating to the tomato 
pack. The output of canned tomatoes in 
this country has been large, prices are 
unprecedentedly low.and canners are like- 
ly to realize but little profit on their 
product or to carry a surplus into the 
next crop year, if no new outlet is dis- 
covered. All this might be said with 
equal truth about other canned vege- 
tables, but it is not these conditi,o(fts 
that lead our canners to take an interest 
in the tomato pack across the border. 
The fact that gives them special interest 
in that vegetable is the higher price at 
which it sells In the United States. They 
naturally wish to see it advance to a 
point at which exportation to the Unit- 
ed States from this country will be pro- 
fitable. The tariff of the United States 
will, so far as that country is concerned, 
continue to confine our canners to this 
market, if the price does not go higher, 
but If it goes much further, then our 
neighbors across the border will be fav- 
ored with a part of our tomato pack. 
The American Grocer shows that the 
United States tomato pack for the year 
1892 was 3,223,165 cases, and that of 
Canada was 143,627. The total pack 
was therefore 3,366,792 cases. Contrary 
to the general belief that the United 



States pack was a short one, Mr. 
Barrett's figures show that it was the 
largest but one on record, that of 1891 
alone exceeding it, and exceeding It by 
only a few hundred cases. Moreover, 
the pack for both countries was not far 
above the average for the last six years, 
which is shown to be 3,179,214 cases. 
The Canadian, as our readers are aware, 
is not much short of twice that of 1891, 
that year's output being 83,000 cases, as 
against 143,627 cases for 1892. The 
American Grocer's explanation of the 
strong position of the United StateB mar- 
ket, with a stock so nearly equal in 
volume to the largest ever turned out, 
is that the consumptive demand has ex- 
panded very greatly. This is an influ- 
ence that will ameliorate the condition 
of our market, if we mistake not, though 
it may not bring prices out of the Slough 
of Despond into which they have fallen. 
There can be no gainsaying the fact 
that canned vegetables have passed into 
the sphere of staple foods. Their cheap- 
ness and edibility are enlarging the do- 
mestic market every year, and it is pos- 
sible that our people may make room 
this year for the greater part of the 
pack on the market. As cheapness is 
the main factor to be relied upon for 
this result, its possibility is but faintly 
encouraging to our packers, who have 
little to choose between selling without 
a sufficient profit and carrying over part 
of their product. To sell in the United 
States markets our canners would prob- 
ably have to shade 70c. With the 45 
per cent, duty on that, the price would 
be $1.01 1-2. Freight would bring this 
above $1.05, the price now quoted for 3- 
pound tomatoes in the New York market. 
But the United States market wants 
quality as well as, or more than, quan- 
tity, and It is unlikely our canners could 
supply choice quality on the low basis 
necessary for that market. It is also a 
question If It is not preferable to rely on 
our own demand for the absorption of 
all first-class goods, as In that kind our 

trade report the most business. 

• • • 

The high prices of pork, eggs and poul- 
try are likely to brighten up the fresh 
fish market. The stocks of frozen salmon 
trout and white fish are now in a very 
good position to stand a run on the de- 
mand, If they should be favored with one. 
While they are ample for the require- 
ments at present indicated, it Is not to 
be forgotten that Lent begins in a month 



and that there will be no relaxation of 
the rules of the church regulating its ob- 
servance by abstinence from meat. The 
weather is cold, and if it remains so, 
stock can be carried and handled with- 
without deterioration. Added to these 
circumstances in the seller's favor are 
the chances for a transfer of the demant 
from pork, poultry and eggs, upon which 
at present the prices are very high. In 
cured fish the market is still more de- 
cidedly in favor of the seller, particular- 
ly in Labrador herring, in which the 
catch has been short. Grocers and gen- 
eral merchants should cultivate a fish 
trade. This year's fish sales ought to 
be a good source of revenue, and it 
comes in at a time when it is most ac- 
ceptable. The butcher's loss If the fish 
seller's gain, and the grocer should aim 
to be the fish seller. 



• • • 



The intensely cold weather of the last 
fortnight has been not only uncomfort- 
able, but to some traders It has been un- 
profitable as well. Unless there Is a con- 
stant supply of heat circulating through 
shops there Is danger from loss through 
the freezing of certain descriptions of 
goods, notably apples and some liquid 
goods. The latter may be none the worse 
of the freezing if they can be retained in 
their packages, but these, being usually 
glass, are liable to burst and allow their 
contents to escape. In cities most gro- 
cers find it necessary to attend to their 
stoves or furnaces through the night, 
both on account of the goods and the 
danger of the water pipes freezing. In 
some cases the latter have been guarded 
against by the keeping open of the taps. 
This, however, is a source of waste, and, 
in the present predicament of the water- 
works department in this city, such 
waste cannot be afforded. There have 
been some fines imposed upon Toronto 
grocers for wasting the water in this 
way. The retail trader will find it a 
good thing to keep his store cosy these 
cold days. Nothing is more grateful to 
the half-frozen customer than a genial 
fire in the shop of her grocer when she 
calls on him. In many instances custom- 
ers run in on the way past, not to buy, 
but to break the hardship of a longer 
Journey. They turn their trading con- 
nection to account in this way, and It 
pays to receive them warmly. Even If a 
customer is warm, the influence of a 
comfortable shop upon the salesman im- 
presses her favorably. It takes just a 
little coal to make all the difference be- 
tween a shivering, cowering, silent at- 
tendant and a bright, pleasant one. 
Which draws the more trade will soon 
be apparent In the drift of the custom. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TEA TESTING. 

To be first-class at anything a man 
must abstain. A man to be a first-class 
tea-taster denies himself many things. 
He must only eat certain kinds of food 
and drink certain drinks ; he must eat or 
drink nothing which will have a ten- 
dency to blunt his taste. A man cannot 
be a habitual smoker nor a habitual 
drinker, nor given to eating anything 
which is in any way flavored with es- 
sences. If he does he will be unable to de- 
detect the finest points in the character 
of certain teas. It is amusing to see some 
young travellers with their samples of 
teas under their arm starting out to try 
and sell them, puffing away with all 
their might at a cigar. Perhaps they 
throw the cigar away before they enter 
the store, but some of them take the butt 
end of it in with them. Now they have 
to compare samples. Their hands smell 
strong of tobacco, but they open up their 
eamples, draw their hands through it 
several times, and the deed is done. 
" Look at that," they say, " for a fine 
tea," and the purchaser looks at it, puts 
his nose to it, perhaps he liquors it ; but 
the tea is spoiled. Instead of the flavor 
of tea, it la a mixture of the flavor of tea 
and tobacco. If the buyer Is a smoker 
himself he will not notice it. If he is not 
a smoker he will detect something wrong 
very quickly,' and another man will come 
in with perhaps an inferior tea and make 
the sale. A man also who is in the habit 
of tasting intoxicating liquors of any 
kind is incapable of being a good judge 
of teas. There are many smoking tea- 
tasters who sell lots of tea, but that is 
sometimes because the men who buy from 
them have confidence in them, and never 
think to try their teas against others, 
and they run an account with the house. 
There are plenty of men in the city even 
yet who do not liquor their tea, but take 
its quality for granted ; whereas, if they 
did liquor it they would find how far 
they were out. The tea taster who 
smokes before tasting his teas is not to 
depended upon, and the man who wishes 
to excel and does excel as a tea taster is 
the one who leaves it alone. There are 
some men who have had such good train- 
ing in this line that it takes a lot of 
drinking and smoking to blunt their keen 
sensibility entirely, but it gets there just 
the same. 



THE COOK TAMPERS WITH THE 
SUGAR. 

" Hello, Corrie ! I wrote down to your 
house the other day." " Oh, did you ; 
what for ?" " To tell them that their 
icing sugar was not pure." " And what 
did they say ?" " They said that it was 
absolutely pure, and I should be careful 
about making such statements as that." 
" Well, what then ?" " I sent some over 
to H. and told him to analyze It. He 
did, and said It was absolutely pure. 



Then I tasted it myself, and it seemed all 
right." "Oh, well, what made you think 
it was not pure in the first place ?" 
" You see I used to sell it to the confec- 
tioners and they used to make icing for 
cakes, and they had some cakes sent back 
because the icing was bad. When I tast- 
ed the icing it seemed funny. I put a 
piece of it in some water and It began to 
fiz. I thought that funny for icing 
sugar. I tasted it again, and It tasted 
like carbonate of soda, which it turned 
out to be. The cook said she thought it 
would improve it, so mixed it, hence the 
mistake. Perhaps someone else was after 
their custom ; I don't know. Sometimes 
;they do funny tricks when it pays them 
better to deal one place than another." 



A STRONG TEA MARKET. 

The tea market is a decidedly inter- 
esting one at present, and it looks very 
much now as though holders who held 
off in the fall in the expectation of better 
terms were to be doomed to disappoint- 
ment. In fact, the indications are all 
the other way, and it would seem from 
the large wholesale turnovers of the 
staple that have occurred at Montreal 
during the last three or four weeks, that 
buyers are at last convinced of the fact 
and want to provide themselves against 
future wants. This is the only way to 
account for the rush which led to sales 
aggregating from 5,000 to 6,000 pack- 
ages, principally Japans, at Montreal, 
and the fact, coupled with the strong 
news from primary markets, has induc- 
ed an appreciation in prices all round, 
so that It Is doubtful if an order could 
be placed now except at an advance from 
lc. to 2c. on the basis possible a fort- 
night or three weeks ago. 

Cable news recently tends to confirm 
the strong position. For instance, recent 
advices from Japan state that the settle- 
ments for the season show a decrease of 
25,000 piculs, or 3,000,000 pounds, and 
the fact has led to considerable specula- 
tion on the New York market, a lot of 
teas which had been held in Montreal on 
New York account being ordered to that 
centre, the owners having procured a 
better figures than the agent could pro- 
cure in Montreal. This lot comprised 
5,000 packages, and further reduces the 
stock of tea held In first hands in Mont- 
real, so that holders now manifest ex- 
tremely independent views as to the 
value of their property. In fact, the 
stock of low grades there is very small 
as compared with former years, and, as 
the market is now closed in Japan, there 
will be little or none of this class of tea 
coming forward. It is worthy of remark 
also that several round lots have been 
taken from Montreal on Chicago ac- 
count, demonstrating a want in that 
section also. 

At all centres the position on tea is 
remarkably strong. A letter from an 
English correspondent to a firm in Mont- 
real, said : " Everything points to a 
hardening market. We have expected 
it, and are now looking back to oi|d 
bought standards. Those who know any- 
thing of the subject must feel surprised 
at tea ever being allowed to go at such 
prices. It is only a short time since that 
useful Pekoe Souchongs were going beg- 



ging here in London at 5 8-4d. per lb., 
and the cry was, • We don't want com- 
mon tea,' but it is curious that at the 
advanced prices the same tea does not 
look nearly so common. The position 
regarding low-priced tea is stronger in 
the case of Ceylon than others, as the 
quantity to be dealt in at the present 
time is ridiculously inadequate to the 
wants of the trade." 

The tone of the letter indicates a pretty 
strong feeling across the water in Eng- 
land, and it may be argued that the 
shortage in the supply of tea is pretty 
general. 



MONTREAL AS A FRUIT CENTRE. 

The superior merits of the St. Law- 
rence route for the shipment of perish- 
able fruit are receiving recognition. THE 
GROCER has pointed this out before, the 
chief advantage that it possesses being 
its coolness as compared with New York, 
and with proper attention by the trade 
in Montreal it should be the means of 
making that centre one of the leading 
auction marts of the continent. At any 
rate, this is the future predicted for the 
port during the season of 1893, a well- 
known New York wholesale jobber of 
fruit being the prophet In the case. He is 
willing to wager that there will be as 
many lemons and oranges auctioned at 
Montreal during 1893 as at any other 
centre. The marked success of the sales 
at Montreal during the two previous 
years has shown the fruit growers and 
exporters at Palermo and Messina that 
Montreal is the only port on this con- 
tinent, the voyage to which benefited the 
fruit, and enabled it therefore to com- 
mand a higher price all round. All the 
talk that is sent out from New York 
every summer about damage to fruit by 
frost, etc., on the St. Lawrence, can be 
set down to pure fiction, and to the in- 
creasing fear of Montreal competition on 
the part of New York firms. All such re- 
ports are due to jealousy of the Canadian 
route, and are not likely to divert any 
shipments from it. In fact, it is antici- 
pated as more than likely that the sea- 
son's sale will reach a quarter of a mil- 
lion boxes, three large cargoes having 
been chartered already, which are ex- 
pected to reach Montreal early in May ; 
in fact, eight, or even ten, cargoes may 
come to the port during the next spring 
and summer. 

Another new feature in the growing 
fruit trade will be the regular weekly 
sales of bananas by the car load, which 
was started last summer and will be con- 
tinued throughout the next ; also regu- 
lar daily sales of California fruit at the 
depot just as they arrive from the Sac- 
ramento valley. In fact, if all the expec- 
tations are realized, Montreal will be a 
big fruit centre in very truth. 



The Michigan Wholesale Grocers' Asso- 
ciation has adopted the equality plan 
for the sale of sugars, it going into effect 
January 3, 1893. 

T. A. Vickers, Owen Sound, was in To- 
ronto this week endeavoring to purchase a 
bankrupt stock. He has made some very 
successful hits in his purchases of this kind. 

C. A. Smylie, of Young & Smylie, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., is on a short trip to Canada. He 
has a great many warm friends in Toronto, 
Kingston and other cities on this side of the 
line. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




[This department is made up largely of items 
from travellers and retailers throughout the 
Dominion. It oontains much interesting informa- 
tion regarding the movements of those in the 
trade. The editor will thank contributors to 
m_ul copy to reach the head office Tuesday.] 

The United States chewed 85 tons of 
tobacco last year. 

The store of J. C. Price, general mer- 
chant, Dutton, Ont., was destroyed by 
fire on the 15th inst. Mr. Price's loss is 
estimated at $4,000. 

A deputation of the Winnipeg Board of 
Trade waited on Superintendent Whyte 
the other day and urged that the rule 
prohibiting commercial travellers from 
riding on freight trains be rescinded. No 
answer was given. 

A number of fellows have recently been 
scouring the county of Essex in search of 
white turnips. The sharpers grind these 
up, season with fluid extract ot horse- 
radish, white mustard and vinegar, and 
then place the stuff on the market as 
first-class horse-radish for table use. An 
ordinary white turnip will yield the 
swindlers about 50 cents net. 

At the annual meeting of the Ottawa 
Board of Trade held last week the presi- 
dent, J. M. Garland, who is wintering in 
California, sent an able review of the 
year's work, in which he suggested that 
the board co-operate with similar bodies 
in Canada for the reorganization of the 
Dominion Board of Trade, with head- 
quarters at Ottawa, where it would be 
in touch with the Government. 

The People's Almanac, prepared as a 
supplement to The Montreal Gazette, is 
issued for 1893 by the publishers of that 
paper. It is a convenient and well-fill- 
ed repository of facts and figures, well 
chosen with an eye to the greatest bene- 
fit of the greatest number. Portraits of 
the Ministers, Provincial Governors, and 
other men prominent in politics, inter- 
sperse the reading matter. A very useful 
feature of the almanac is the list of 
events of 1892, presented in chronologi- 
cal order. 

On the 11th inst., at noon, at the resi- 
dence of the bride's mother, Mrs. Cath- 
arine German, Mary street, Picton, Ont., 
George Edward Boulter, of the firm of 
Boulter & Sons, eldest son of W. Boulter, 
was married to Miss Helen Blanche Ger- 
man, by Rev. Dr. McDearmid. Frank 
Boulter, brother of the groom, was best 
man, and Miss Alice Conger, of Hollo- : 
well, acted as bridesmaid. After the cere- 
mony and congratulations the company' 
sat down to an elegant repast. The 
happy couple left by the afternoon train 
for their wedding trip, followed by the 
good wishes of their host of friends. 

At a recent meeting of the Victoria, 
B. ft, Board of Trade, the question of Do- 
minion legislation regarding insolvency 
was brought up, and a letter read from 
the Vancouver board. J. H. Todd said 
that the Attorney-General would have 
a bill brought before the Legislature 
framed upon the Ontario and Manitoba 
Acts. Robert Ward wished the matter 
placed in the hands of the Dominion mem- 
bers. He did not think this would inter- 



fere with local legislation. J. H. Todd 
having moved that the Dominion Parlia- 
ment members insist upon the passage of 
a Dominion Act. Colonel Prior, M.P., re- 
minded the board that the matter has 
often been brought up in the Dominion 
House but there was no unanimity 
about the contents of the bill. There 
was great need of such an act. He would 
urge, not insist ; the Government could 
not be driven. 

The Commercial Travellers' Mutual 
Benefit Society held their annual meeting 
at the rooms of the association on Yonge 
street, Toronto, on Saturday afternoon. 
The attention of the meeting was direct- 
ed chiefly to the election of officers and 
the revision of the by-laws. The officers 
elected were as follows : President, James 
Greenfield ; vice-president, Thomas Dun- 
net ; treasurer, Warren Kennedy. Trus- 
tees, T. M. Bayne, W. B. Dack and Jos. 
eph Taylor, for three years ; H. Good- 
man, H. Lamong and John A. Ross for 
two years ; R. L. Patterson, Robert 
Crean and S. R. Wlckett for one year ; 
E. A. Dailey and W. M. Bremner, Hamil- 
ton ; T. C. Fleming, Brantford ; C. Huber, 
Berlin ; N. D. McArthur, Belleville ; M. R. 
O'Laughlin, Winnipeg ; J. W. Dillon, Lon- 
don ; and M. S. Sutherland, Kingston. 
The association has paid out $16,700 in 
death claims, and the reserve fund now 
amounts to $15,573. The membership of 
the society is 1,954. 

On Saturday, at noon, George M. Wil- 
kinson, senior member of the grocery firm 
of Wilkinson & Sons, Kingston, died, 
aged 69 years. He was a very success- 
ful man, wealthy and influential. He was 
a native of Kingston. For three years 
he had been incapacitated because of ner- 
vous affection, and from its effects he 
died. Two sons, Henry C. and George, 
conduct the business. The deceased built 
many substantial blocks in Kingston. 

At a meeting of the Patrons of Indus- 
try in Forest, Ont., Mr. Mallory, the 
president of the order, repudiated the no- 
tion that there is any antagonism be- 
tween Patrons and storekeepers. The 
buying of goods at a reduced price was, 
he said, no part of the Patron constitu- 
tion. Any number of neighbors can join 
and make a bargain with storekeepers 
for goods at a percentage on invoice 
prices. It requires no charter to do that. 
But the P. of I. have become an incor- 
porated body for far higher purpose* 
than buying sugar and tea. If Patrons 
have been benefited by getting their 
goods cheaper, that is simply an out- 
come of the organization. 

C. H. Peebles, Hamilton, has a useful 
attachment to his front door that should 
be put on every shop door in the country. 
By it your door can be opened by any of 
the employees from behind the counter. 
A rope is attached to the latch of the 
door and run up to the top along the 
outside panel. From there it is carried 
diagonally across to the ceiling, and 
from there to a point behind the counter. 
Then by pulling a rope the latch is lift- 
ed, and the door opens wide. A spring 
attached to the door closes it again. 
" Tou don't know how useful and labor- 
saving an invention this is," says C. H. 
Peebles to THE GROCER'S representa- 
tive last week. " If a lady happens to 
enter the store with parcels in her hand 
or even without, how nice it is to open 
the door for her. It saves a lot of time 
in running to and from the front door, 
and, as there is always someone behind 
the counter, we are always polite In 
opening our door for our customers. I 
saw this device in Buffalo some months 
ago, and it works to perfection." 



ASSOCIATION ITEMS. 

A paper was presented at the last 
meeting of the Grand Rapids, Mich., Re- 
tail Grocers' Association recommending 
an amendment to the present exemption 
laws, allowing delinquents only $1 per 
day exempt from attachment, instead of 
$25. 

The Fort Wayne, Lad., Sentinel is re- 
sponsible for the statement that the Re-*' 
tail Grocers' Associations of the state 
are preparing to march upon the general 
assembly with a large force to secure 
the passage of a bill to protect them 
from " dead beats." The measure pro- 
posed is on the principle of the mechan- 
ics' lien law, and will compel men to pay 
their grocery bills. It Is claimed that 
with such a law in force the cost of gro- 
ceries to consumers who are now paying 
the percentage on losses from " dead 
beats" would be greatly decreased. 

The Retail Grocery Clerks' Mutual 
Benefit Association of Pittsburg and 
Allegheny, entertained its friends at a 
ball and reception at Armory Hall on 
Tuesday evening, January 3. The affair 
was well attended and was quite a suc- 
cess. The clerks' association is In a flour- 
ishing condition, and is doing a great 
deal of work. 

About a year ago a resolution was 
passed by the New York Retail Grocers' 
Union, asking that all clerks applying 
for situations, of drivers and other em- 
ployees of those who supply the retail 
grocery trade of this city, should be re- 
ferred to the New York Retail Grocers' 
Union, Clerks' Departmtnt, where a prop- 
er entry of names and references could 
be made, thus aiding the work of ferret- 
ing out those who were dishonest, or in- 
competent. Letters were sent to all the 
large bakers and others, notifying them 
of the union's action. From the replies 
received it was uaderstood that in the 
future the wishes of the union would be 
acquiesced iu.— Retail Grocers' Advocate. 

At the last regular meeting of the New 
York Retail Grocers' Union a resolution 
whicli is to be submitted to the State 
Board of Trade, and which is worded as 
follows, was unanimously adopted ; 

Resolved, That we, the State Board of 
Trade, condemn the limited price system 
now in vogue among manufacturers and 
jobbers, and urge the enforcement of all 
laws for the suppression of the same. 

A. H. Gunn has re-entered the employ 
of the Dunwich Co-Operative Association, 
Dutton, Ont. Mr. Gunn had withdrawn 
his services from that association, as was 
mentioned some time ago in THE GRO- 
cer, but his old employers have made it 
worth his while to re-engage. 





es ! doit es 



Ale, Wine, and Spirit 
Bottles. 



For Sale 



By 



Bum Qros. 



17 Common St., 
Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




We were pleased .... 
to note last weeks . . . 
Advertisement had its . 
effect — let it continue— 
You will always find . 
us willing to meet your 



views. 



LUCAS, 



We are open to buy 
^:| Dried Apples. Write 
•~| us if you have any to 

sell. 



STEELE 



T3 )Mc#ab 
Street jlovfy S 
Hamilton 



BRISTOL 



A steadily increasing 
Trade is the best evidence 
that our Standard Lines of 




Mallawalla is packed in V4 and 1 lb. lead pack- 
ages, 50 lb. cases. Dalukola, Imperial, Con- 
gou and Russan Congou are bulk (not 
package) teas, and put up in 80 and 100 lb. 
metal-lined cases. 



Mallawalla 
Dalukola . 



Imperial Gongou 

and 

Russian Gongou 



W. H. Gillard & Co., 



m m ^IVE entire satisfaction. Retail 
^1 Merchants have told us that 
their Black Tea Trade has steadily in- 
creased since keeping one or more of 
these lines. They retail at 45 to 50 cts 
and show a splendid profit. If you are 
desirous of working up a fine Tea 
Trade try a sample package. To pur- 
chasers of these Teas we give a novel 
and most effective method of placing 
jt before consumers. If our travellers 
do not reach your district drop us a 
card for particulars. 



WHOLESALE TEA AGENTS 
FOR CANADA, 

Hamilton, Ont. 




The 
the M 



S5££ Messrs. Chase & Sanborn 

Is a guarantee of the excellence of their 



^E^riure Coffee, 



Seal Brand ^"e^P 1 

Condensed Coffee, ^T | Cream and Sugar 



PRICES AND SAMPLES ON APPLICATION TO 



James Turner &- Go., 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



4( 



/V\0/NS00N" 



PURE INDIAN TEA. Always relia 
ble, never changes. In cases of 60 
1 lb. caddies, or 120 halves. 



WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED NUMEROUS LINES OF INDIAN AND CEYLON TEAS, 

IN CHESTS AND HALF CHESTS. 

STAILTIO.AIRIO BLEIsTZDEID TEAS. 

OUR BLENDING DEPARTMENT IS NOW OPEN, UNIFORMITY CAN BE RELIED ON. WE HAVE THE 
FIRST CHOICE OF THE MARKET AND THE BEST ESTATES AT OUR DISPOSAL, AND GUARANTEE EXCEL- 
LENT VALUE. WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 



STEEL, HAYTER&CO. 



11 AND 13 FRONT ST. EAST 



Growers' and Importers, Toronto, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE TARE IN DATES. 

Toronto, July 17, '93. 

Dear Grocer,— Will you please ascer- 
tain for the subscriber what is the customary 
tare allowed by the grocery and fruit trade 
on dates. If we mistake not it has been 
customary for the grocery houses to allow 
the retailer 8 lbs., but evidently the fruit 
dealers are only allowing 7 lb. We have 
tared several lots lately and find that 8 lb. 
is the about proper tare, and any merchant 
receiving only 7 lbs. from wholesale Iruit 
dealers is just 1 lb. out on every box. It 
might be well for fellow retailers to know 
the proper tare when purchasing these 
goods. 

Your kind attention will oblige. 
Yours truly, 

"Queen St. West." 

[The Grocer has look into the matter in 
accordance with the wish expressed above 
and finds that though the usual allowance is 
8 lbs., there are instances where 7 lbs. are 
allowed, In one case 9 lbs. was given as the 
regular tare. Editor Grocer.] 



A CAUSE OF FAILURE. 

Among many causes of failure in business 
none is more common than the impatience of 
individuals The average man, coming to 
years of discretion, after working for a salary, 
feels able to manage for himself, and em- 
barks in a venture of one kind or another 
with more or less capital. He is sanguine 
of success, or he certainly would not risk his 
time and money, but it is seldom that he 
realizes the length of the journey before he 
can feel certain that he has an established 
connection. Some men acknowledge to 
themselves that there are such things as bad 
debts, dulf seasons, and losses of all sorts to 
be faced, but even these men do not realize 
the time that must elapse before a business 




TO YOU it is 

PROFITABLE and a 

QUICK SELLER. 

Thousands testily to its PURITY and 

Wonderful washing qualities in 

HARD or SOFT WATER. 



advertises itself, as one may say, or brings in 
money solely by reason of its being well con- 
ducted. 

Through not considering how long it takes 
to make a business, many get discouraged 
and sell out at a loss, or fail wholly, when, 
if they had been satisfied with the day of 
small things, they might have lived to see 
them grow larger. The hare and the tor- 
toise of iEsop's fable exist to-day in trade, 
and the business hare is just as confident of 
his ability to make a trade in a day as his 
congener was of outstripping the hard-shell 
conservative who went slower, but got there 
first in the sequel ; for it is not so much bril- 
liancy that is wanted as sturdy sticking to 
trade through thick and thin. It matters 
not what calling, or what line men take up 
in any one of them, certain qualities must be 
manifested, and ordinary business faculty 
will succeed with perseverance, where the 
erratic, can't- wait man misses every time. — 
Commercial Enquirer. 



TRY IT. 



ROYAL SOAP CO., 

Winnipeg, Man 



THE CURRANT SITUATION, 

The immediate future of the currant mar- 
ket ib considered in doubt at the present 
tim^, owing to the liberal quantity with 
which the situation appears to be burdened. 
During the past week three cargoes have 
been landed in port, the R. F. Mathews with 
5,100 bbls., 500 half do. and 12,500 half- 
cases ; the Southwold with 3,800 bbls. and 
36,800 half-cases, and Persian Prince with 
900 bbls., 600 half do., 700 cases and 12,000 
half do., or say a total of 9,800 bbls., 1,100 
half do., 700 cases and 61,500 half do. The 
British Prince is the only boat po«ted on the 
way, her cargo consisting of 1,200 bbls. and 
300 half do. Previous to the arrival of above 
vessels the market was well supplied with 
the various packages, and the principal 
holders sought in vain for sufficient interest 
from the trade to reduce the qu intity upon 
offer ; but buyers, confronted with the heavy 
prospective arrivals, continued to act indif- 
ferently when approached, with the result of 
a slow distribution into the channels ot 
consumption and sagging prices. By easy 
stages the value has receded for some time 
past until now the quotation rests upon the 
nominal basis of 3X C '° r barrels and 3^ic 
for ordinary quality in cases. These prices 
it is said, do not cover the average cost of 
the goods recently landed, the bulk of the 
stock received standing the importers 3X to 
3f£c. while in some instances the equivalent 
of y/z was paid laid down in this market. 
The condition of affairs is certainly embar- 
rassing to importers, for to recede from their 
present position means to increase the losses 
they are sustaining, and to stand their ground 
\i to deprive themselves of orders, as the 
majority of the trade, particularly at this 
period ot the year, are not pressed for additi- 
onal stock, hence negotiations are opened 
only when necessities compel. Though cur- 
rants are to-day regarded by many in the 



trade as cheap, there have been times in the 
past when with a duty of one cent per lb. 
the value has been as low, or approaching 
very closely the present quotation of the mar- 
ket. The crop of the past season in Greece 
is estimated to have been in the neigh- 
borhood ot 150,000 tons a quantity cer- 
tainly liberal when to it is added a consid- 
erable quantity carried over from the pre- * 
vious crop. In the face of this supply the 
Greek market has been sustained with re- 
markable strength during the entire period 
since the harvesting, and is to-day cabled at 
a point considerably above the value ruling 
here. From all accounts there yet remains 
a rather full supply at primary sources to be 
marketed, but the Greeks are locking with 
expectant eyes to the wine-makers of France 
for relief from their holdings. Should the 
demand from that country materialize^ firm, 
if not a higher, market may be counted up- 
on, under which circumstances our importers 
would be encouraged to maintain their posi- 
tion and take the chances of the market 
later ; but should the stock in France prove 
sufficient to carry them through the season 
without additions from Greece, it is more 
than probable that the firmness now preva- 
lent in the latter country would give place 
to weakness, and possibly a decline. Upon 
this feature, therefore, depends entirely the 
course of this market. Our stocks today 
are large, some estimating the quantity as 
sufficient to carry the trade through the 
greater portion of the coming season, bu: 
should the market abroad break, the result 
would undoubtedly be additional quantities 
purchased or consigned, the effect of which 
at the present time can only be conjectured. 
California is beginning to loom upa> a com- 
petitor with Greece in the production of the 
higher class of stock. Some few years ago 
it was said that no country in the world pos- 
sessed the soil and climate for the produc- 
tion of this berry. The same was once said 
in reference to Spain and Turkey regarding 
the growth of raisins, but Yankee push and 
enterprise, brought to bear upon the soil of 
California, produced wonderful results with 
the raisin, and it looks now as if with a few 
years to propagate the vines the banner 
State of the Pacific Coast will be putting 
currants upon this market in the same liberal 
manner with which she is now dealing out 
raisins. Samples of the fru't have recently 
come to hand, indicating that the State is 
making progress in the new industry, and 
the quality of the goods submitted compares 
favcrable with the best Vostizza coming from 
Greece. — N. Y. Commercial Bulletin. 



Sneak thieves have troubled Port Hope 
merchants for sometime back. The culprits 
always managed to escape, until the other 
day when two of them were arrested for rob- 
bing the grocery store of James Dunfee. 
Their plunder in that robbery amounted 
to nearly $100. They also damaged the store 
and stock in their rummaging search for the 
more portable and valuable wares. The 
thieves turned out to be two boys. Part of 
the property was recovered in a shanty near 
the home of one of the boys. Both boys 
have a bad record. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Ceylon and Indian Teas ^^^ 

We are offering big values in Ceylon and 
Indian Teas. It will pay you to see our 
samples before buying 

H. P. ECKHART & CO. Wholesale Grocers Toronto 



FOR 

COOKING 

PURPOSES 



s t.CHAR t ^ 

H 

EVAPORATED CREAM 

STZEJZRILIZIEJID- 

It makes the most delicious 

Puddings 
Custards 
Ice Cream 

DELAFIELD, MCCOVERN & CO., 



91 Hudson St., Sole Agents. 

NEW YORK. 

33 River Street, 

CHICAGO. 

215 California St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

for sale in Canada by 

AMES TURNER & CO 

Hamilton. Out. 



HUDON, HEBERT & CIE., 



Wholesale Grocers 

AND 

Wine Importers, 



304, 306 St. Paul St., 

143, 145 Commissioners St. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 



Now in stock and ready to quote 

2000 boxes Sultana Raisins. 

200 barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

200 half barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

New Nuts of all kinds. 

Fine Off Stalk Valencia Raisins, different brands. 

A few boxes NEW MALAGA Fruit left. 



L. CHAPUT, FILS & CIE. 



Wholesale Grocers, Montreal 



S 



Y^OPS - 



We have a splendid Assortment at 
Bottom Prices 



See our Travellers or write us for Samples 
and Quotations before buying 



CAVERHILL, ROSE, HUGHES & CO., W E 



MONTREAL 



MAY TEAS. 

We have still a fairly large stock of 

FIRST CROP JAPANS 

And would advise our friends to buy NOW as the visible supply of these Teas 

is nearly exhausted. 

REGAN, WHITE Sc CO., 

1, 3 and 5 St. Helen St., MONTREAL. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE ASSOCIATION'S AT HOME. 

" The glad circle yield their souls 
To festive mirth and wit that knows no gall." 

The seasons in their annual round deal 
out no brighter hours to the grocery trade of 
this city than those chosen for the yearly At 
Home of the Toronto Retail Grocers' Asso- 
ciation. The spirit in which the guests 
come together and the felicitous arrange- 
ments of the committees, are admirably and 
always successfully calculated to drive out 
dull care and make the general enjoyment 
spontaneous and unalloyed. The evening is 
always looked forward to with the most 
pleasurable anticipations, and the fact that 
these are always realized is the reason that 
larger numbers are present each succeeding 
year. 

This year's At Home was held on Wed- 
nesday evening in Webb's assembly rooms. 
The splendour of past At Homes in the his- 
tory of the Association was not only revived 
but was eclipsed by the magnificent success 
of this one. The committees to whom were 
allotted the various divisions of the work of 
preparation acquitted themselves, or the per- 
fection of their work acquitted them, with- 
out a fault All circumstances that could 
be invoked to produce a contagion of enjoy- 
ment appeared to be happily secured and 
combined by the forethought of the mem- 
bers in charge, so that pleasure was not a 
matter of seeking but of enjoying upon offer. 

The programme for the concert was all 
that could be desired to while away the time 
before the company repaired to the ball- 
room, the parts being selected and rendered 
specially with the object of amusing. The 
committees were named in our last issue. 
In this we present portraits and sketches of 
the newly elected officers. They are given 
below : 




but the land of his adoption — for he was born 
of Scottish parnts in South Africa — does not 
make his affection for Canada less ardent 
than if it were a native sentiment. Twenty- 
three years ago his family left the Cape, and 
he has ever since dwelt in this city. Thus 
the years of his life when he was most open 
to impressions, most susceptible to the mould- 
ing influence of his surroundings, were spent 
in Canada, and it is small wonder that his 
tastes, habits of thought and patriotic in- 
stincts became thoroughly assimilated to the 
corporate life of the country into which he 
was thrown so early. His training as a gro- 
cer was begun under Kmnear & Lang, con- 
tinued under J. W. Lang & Co. and finished 
under Fulton Michie. His connection with 
the Association began with the founding of 
that body in 1885. He is an energetic mem- 
ber, goes in for making the Association of 
practical use to everybody in it, and is both 
a thoughtful worker and conscientious at- 
tendant at its meetings. He has traded for 
nine years on the corner of Belleview Avenue 
and Nassau street, has built up a sound and 
extensive business, and will soon put his sign 
out before a larger store in a more prominent 
part of the city. He goes upon the right 
principles to succeed. 




D. W. CLARK, PRESIDENT. 

Mr. David W. Clark, the President of the 
Association, is a young man, now in the thirty 
third year of his age. The fact that this is 



J. G. GIBSON, VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Mr. J. G. Gibson, the Vice-president, is 
an Englishman. He was born at Long 
Crendon, in Buckinghamshire. His training 
as a grocer he received in Wendover, where 
he was bound in a three years' apprentice- 
ship. Drilled in the inflexible Old Country 
school, Mr. Gibson came to Canada eminently 
fitted to succeed. As well as a thorough 
training, he bad tact, great force of character, 
and integrity. Upon his arrival in this city, 
he opened a grocery up Yonge street, where 
he has carried on business the whole subse- 
quent period of twenty-two years. 

Mr. Gibson made a specialty of the tea 
and butter trade, two of the most sensitive 
articles kept in a grocery, and his success in 
these lines is the foundation of the present 
trade. Mr. Gibson has always been an active 
member of the Association, and has rendered 
it good service by his abilities as a financier. 

Martin McMillan, Treasurer of the As- 
sociation, is a very prominent member of 
the retail grocery trade in this city. He is 
well known as a sterling unpretentious man. 
For ten years he carried on a successful 
business at the corner of Yonge and Gerrard 
streets, and removed from there because the 



I \^ 







MR. MCMILLAN, THE TREASURER. 

building was to be pulled down and replaced 
by another. He bought out the stock of 
McCormick & Co., on the corner of Yonge 
and Ann streets, to which stand he trans- 
ferred his business and a great deal of the 
custom he had attached in his former store. 
In four years he has buih up a big trade in 
his present premises. He is a very capable 
business man and does not know what it is 
to fail. 




R M. CORRIE, SECRETARY. 

The son of a wholesale baker and confec- 
tioner, Mr. 3orrie was born on the High 
street, Dumfries, Scotland. Left an orphan 
in the care of guardians at the early age of 
five, he was schooled in Liverpool at Liv- 
erpool College, Shaw street. At the same 
time he learned the grocery business from a 
foster brother who had six stores in Liver- 
pool. The brother failing, R. M. left there, 
and was engaged as cashier for Dakin & Co., 
No. 1 St. Paul's Churchyard and Oxford 
Circus, London, Eng., one of the oldest tea 
houses in London. This place he filled with 
satisfaction to his employers for five years. 
He left there to better hisfortunes in Canada. 

The Hamilton Retail Grocers' Associa- 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



! I 



J. F. EBY. 



HUGH BLAIN. 



Seal Brand Cofeee 




Is not a manufactured substitute 
for Coffee but the absolutely 
pure concentrated strength, flavor 

and aroma of the Finest Java. 

Coffee, blended with Pure 
Cream and Granulated Sugar. A 
capital article and a good seller. 
Note name of manufacturer: — 



CHASE & SANBORN 



FOR SALE BY 



EBY, gLAIN & Co- 



wholesale 

GROCERS 



Toronto, Ont- 



tion was represented at the At-Home by 
Messrs. Adam Ballantine and Chas. Brem- 
ner, both of whom expressed themselves 
highly delighted with their friendly recep- 
tion and paid the committee of management 
unstinted praise for the unqualified success 
of the affair. 

Among the prominent lights present we 
noticed the great N. P. Soap Morton. Mr. 
Simpson's ventnloquial joke at the expense 
of the Hamilton Soap King was highly ap- 
preciated by Mr. Morton. 

ECHOES OF THE DANCE. 

It would be difficult to say who was the 
belle of the ball, there were so many. 

President Clark is just a bit modest yet, 
he has the ability and the information, and 
Mr. Gibson says he should not be afraid to 
let out. 

The opening official set of lancers was 
made up of President Clark, and Miss 
Gibson, Mr. and Mrs. A Dennis, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. M. Piper and Mr. and Mrs. Sloan; 
next them was a set made up of Mr. George 
and Miss Barron, P. C. Larkin and Miss 
White, W. W. and Miss Park, Mr. and Miss 
Taylor ; next them came sets formed by Mr. 
and Mrs. Butcher and Mr. Saunders and 
Miss Bradley, Mr. Shields and Mrs. Shields, 
Mr. Kempton and Mrs. Kempton, Mr. Gor- 
ion Crean and Miss Butcher. 

Orillia was represented by Miss Moore, 
daughter of Chas. Moore, the well-known 
merchant of that town. 

The "green grocer" was represented by 
a gentleman with a green tie. 

The ventriloquist got off several capital 
hits. One of his dummies was Irish and the 
other colored. "Where's Henry Wright ? 
said the Irishman. I want some Surprise 
Soap to clean the nigger." Again, "Ah, 
there, Larkin, I see you ; Have you joined 



the combine?" " Kinnear, do you want a 
city traveller ?" " Mills, how about the 
peddlers ?" 

Among those present we noticed : — 

Mr. W. R. Armstrong, Mrs. Andrews, 
Mr. and Mrs. P. Andrews, Miss Adams, 
Mrs. A. S. Anderson, Mr. James Austin. 
Mr. J. Adams. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Ballantyne, Hamil- 
ton ; Mr. P. Baigent, Mr. and Mrs. E. Y. 
Barker and Miss Barker, Mr. and Mrs. A. 
G. Booth, Mr. and Mrs. John Butcher, Miss 
Butcher, Mr. A. A. Beard, Mr. D. Bennett, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Bond, Mr. and Mrs. 
Brock, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Borwick, Mr. A. 
Beattie and Miss Beattie, Mr. J. F. Beaid, 
Mr. Chas. Bremner, of Hamilton, Mr. Geo. 
Barron, Miss Barron, Miss Bradley, Mrs. 
Barclay, Mr. Chas. Bain, Miss Buck. 

Miss Cewker, Miss Clayton, Mr, and Mrs. 
D. W. Claik, Mr. R. Calhoon, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clark, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Cleary, Mr. Con- 
nell, Mr. E. H Copp, Mr. F. W. Cowan, 
Miss Cowan, Mr. A. E. Clemes, Mr Crean. 

Miss Dalley, Mr. E. B. Dewey, Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Dimmock, MissDimmock, Lieut. 
Col. J. I. Davidson, Mr. W. Dallimore, Mr. 
Fred Dixon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eddows, Mr. and Mrs. F. 
Everest, Mr. C. Edmonds, Miss Edmonds, 

Mrs. Findlay, Mr. and Miss Findlay, Mr. 
H. C. Fortier, (Toronto Biscuit Co.) Mr. R. 
S. Flint, Mr. D. Fitzgerald, Mr. and Mrs, C. 
S. Fairbairn, Mr. and Mrs. Farewell. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Gibson, Miss Gibson, 
Mr. I. Godley, Mr. A. Gardiner, Miss Gar- 
diner, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Gibson. 

Mr.J.H.Huntsberger, Miss Harris, Mr.and 
Mrs. Hoskin, Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Husband, 
Mr. A. Hutchinson, Mr.and Mrs. C. Husband. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Kempton, Mr. T. 
Kinnear, Miss Kinnear. 



Mr. H. and Misses Lindsay, Mr. J. W. 
Lang, Miss Laing, Mr. P. C. Larkin. 

Mr. and Mrs McMillan, Mr. Jas Moir, 
Mrs. S. H. Moore, Mr, Moill, Mr. McKenzie, 
Mr. and Mrs. McCleary. Mr. J. Mortimer, 
Miss Mortimer, Mr. W. K. McCurry, Mr. 
S. McKenzie, Mr. S. K. Moir, Mr. D. Mor- 
ton, Jr., Hamilton, Miss Macpherson, Mr.and 
Mrs. Mills, Miss Macfarlane, Mr. W. Mason, 
Mr. W. A. Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Mullhol- 
land, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Massey, Mr. D. 
McDonald, Mr. J. F. Morrish and wife, Mr. 
John Meharg, Mr. John Mathers, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. McWilliams, Mr. J. A. McGuire, 
Miss McCaw, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Milligan, 
Mr. W. H. Miln, Mr. J. B. McLean, Mr. 
H. C. McLean, of The Canadian Grocer. 

Mr. P. Pearson, Mr. and Mrs. A. Park, 
Mr. C. S. Parsons. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Radcliffe, Miss Richard- 
son, Mr. S. S. Richardson, Miss Alice Rich- 
ardson, Mr. A. Pinker, Mr. G. F. Rupert, 
Mr. C. H. Rose, Miss Hewson. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. K Stewart, Mr. A. M. Sinclair.the Misses 
Sinclair, Mr. and Mrs. C. Shields, Mr. B. H. 
Spence, Mr. R. T. Sinclair, Mr. and Mrs. 
Snow, Mrs. S. H. Scott, Miss Scott, Mr. 
Henry Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Saun- 
ders, Miss Smith, Miss Saunders, Miss S. 
Smith, Mr. W. H. Spencer, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
W. Sparrow, Mr. and Mrs. J. Sloan, Mr. W. 
H. Seyler, Mrs. Suilivan. 

Mr. R. Thompson, Mr. R. W. Thompson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Trent, Mr. A. Thompson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Tomlin, Mr. H. W. Thorp. 

Mr. and Miss White, Mr. and Mrs. White, 
the Misses White Mr. A. Wilber, Mr. Walk- 
er, Mr. J- M. Wright, Mr. Henry Wright, 
Mr. B. Woodman, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. 
Woods, Miss Walsh. 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




o 

O 




H 



P 
O 

o 

Q 



DRY GOODS. 

The past week has seen very few buy- 
ers on the market, as most of the retail- 
ers are either stock-taking or preparing 
for it, and hence are not visiting the mar- 
kets. Travellers' orders are coming in 
quite satisfactorily ; in most cases they 
are ahead of the same period last year. 
Winter stocks are being steadily light- 
ened by retailers, and this gives a more 
animated spirit to spring ordering. 

Remittances are fairly good. They are 
better than at the close of the year and 
are fully up to the average for this time 
of the year. The North-west and British 
Columbia, which were slow in December, 
were very good the first ten days of the 
new year, but they are slacking off 
again. 

Chadwick's spool cotton has advanced 
another 10c. to $3.40 for regular and 
$3.50 for special labels. It is not im- 
probable that there will be advances in 
other makes in the near future. The 
Chadwick spooling factory in Montreal, 
though running night and day, is un- 
able to catch up with their orders, the 
demand being so large and increasing. 

Some makers of Canadian braces have 
advanced 20 per cent, on the figures at 
which they sold in November last. 

A number of agents selling Japanese 
goods have been on the Toronto and 
Montreal markets this month showing 
novelties in embroidered, initialed, and 
hem-stitched handkerchiefs. Prices will 
be lower than last year, owing to our 
increasing trade with Japan. One agent 
came direct from Tokio, Japan ; he is a 
gentleman of German birth, but has liv- 
ed in Japan for 20 years. 

Mufflers have sold well this season. 
Dark patterns took the lead, with a 
tendency towards a better class of 
goods. 

NOTES. 

Wyld, Grasett & Darling are show- 
ing some special lines in neglige shirts. 
These come in flannelettes of lowest 
grades, very effective patterns in Bed- 
ford cords, and silk striped Madras 
shirts. In regatta shirts they have some 
neat lines, including short stiff bosoms, 
with attached collars ; soft bosoms with 
stiff collar and cuffs, colored pique bos- 
oms with soft white body, as well as the 
staple lines. They have received another 
very large shipment of neckwear. This 
about completes their regular purchase 
of neckwear for the spring and summer 
trade. They claim to show very special 
value in block neckwear of all kinds, and 
carry a well assorted stock. They are 
showing a line of English braces with 
saddler's ends, a feature which makes 
them very strong and durable without 
losing the stylish appearance. 

Mr. Begg, buyer of the woollen depart- 
ment of John Macdonald & Co., sailed on 
the 13th for Great Britain. His mission 
is to find the leading lines and patterns 
for the fall trade. 

John Macdonald & Co., are receiving 
large shipments of their spring woollens. 
Their range this year in both domestic 
and imported is ahead oi previous sea- 
sons. Serges in hop-sack and diagonal 
weaves will be very fashionable this sea- 
season. They are making a specialty 
of black worsteds in all the best makes, 
and they aim to have a full stock of 
these goods all the year through. Their 
stock of tailors' trimmings is also very 
complete at present ; every thing In this 
line that can possibly be required Is be- 
ing shown. They carry a neat range of 
man t lings for the spring trade, in serges, 



box-cloths, fancy brocades, in all the lat- 
est colorings. 

Gordon, Mackay & Co., are receiving 
their spring importations of neckwear. 
In knots, the newest thing is the Dude, 
being a very small tapering knot, with 
a wide, flowing end. In four-in-hands the 
width is about the same as last season, 
namely, 2 1-2 to 3 inches. They come in 
handsome dark and light effects. In 
wash ties, their range of piques and 
Derbys is very attractive, and the de- 
signs are new. In ladies' Windsor ties 
they have an almost endless variety, in- 
cluding cottons, pongees and surahs. 
They run in self shades, polka dots and 
fancies. In their curtain department they 
are showing a strong range of fancy 
art muslins in the latest colorings, with 
and without borders. In chenille cur- 
tains they have an extensive range, both 
in plain centres, with dado at top and 
bottom, and in clever combinations in 
all figured goods. 



HYMEN IN THE PURE GOLD. 

Cupid has been very active lately 
among the staff of the Pure Gold Manu- 
facturing Co., of this city. Two of their 
number, James Litster, chemist, and Geo. 
Stacey, their popular young Manitoba 
traveller, have fallen victims to his art, 
and both have passed over to the Bene- 
dicts. Mr. Litster was married in Old 
St. Andrew's church here to Mrs. Bell 
Pollie, of Kingston, and started off the 
same day to spend his honeymoon in a 
tour through some of the American 
cities. 

The office of the company presented an 
unusually lively appearance on the pre- 
vious Saturday at noon, when 40 of the 
employees trooped down, and Mr. Lit- 
ster was called in and presented with a 
handsome walnut secretary and book- 
case combined. He afterwards entertain- 
ed Mr. Jardine and the heads of depart- 
ments to a sumptuous lunch at the Do- 
dega, when speeches were in order, and 
many congratulations and much good 
advice given the groom elect. 

At the same hour on Tuesday, Mr. 
Stacey was married at his old home, St. 
Thomas, to Miss Mary V. Wood, daugh- 
ter of. A. J. Wood, of that place. Miss 
Weltha Haight attended the bride, and 
Arthur Wood supported Mr. Stacey. 

After the ceremony the happy couple 
started for Winnipeg, where they will 
make their future home. Among the 
many handsome and valuable presents 
to the bride was a beautifully bound set 
of Sir Walter Scott's works, sent by ex- 
press from Toronto by the Pure Gold 
staff. 

Both weddings were very quiet, only 
the immediate relatives being present. 



MOST PERFECT MADE. 

It contains neither Ammonia, Alum, or 
any other injurious ingredients. 

It is the lightest and fluffiest of all pow- 
ders. 

^PRICE'S 




Powder 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



John Jamieson & Co's 
LOCHFYNE 

HERRINGS 

56-60 E. Howard Street, GLASGOW. 
Agent, W. S. KENNEDY, 

463 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 

DRESSED 
POULTRY 

We are now booking orders for shipment 
on or about December the fourth next, to 
points in British Columbia, delivery in time 
for Xmas trade. Poultry will be thoroughly 
frozen and packed in either close or open 
cases, weighing two hundred pounds each. 
We offer special prices on large lots. 

PARSONS PRODUCE CO., 



WINNIPEG, 



MANITOBA. 



W. F. BUCHANAN, 

BROKER, COMMISSION MERCHANT 

AND 

GENERAL PURCHASING AGENT, 
-W-II ETIETIF IE] Or. 

REPRESENTING: 

ARMOUR & Co., Chicago, 111. 

THE ARMOUR PACKING CO., Kansas City. Mo. 

THE B. C. SUGAR REFINING CO., Ltd., Van- 
couver, B. C. 

BUCHANAN & CO., Saltcoats, N. W. T. 

HIRAM WALKER & SONS, Ltd., Walkerville, 
Ont. 

JOHN DEWAR & SONS, Tullymet Distillery, 
Perth, N. B. 

PERINET ET FILS, Reims. 



Warehouses on C. P. R. Track. 

Excise, Customs and Free, 

and Low Rates Storage. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

1QOTIOE. 

1 he British Columbia Fruit Canning and 
Coffee Co'|, LH. 

VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Having largely increased their capacity. We ad- 
vise all dealers to see their price list before plac- 
ing their ordeis for Jams, Jellies, Canned Fruits, 
and Canned Vegetables. 

Besides their regular brands of Ground Coffee, 
now so favorably known, they quote : 
Blend No. 1 at 35c, either ground or whole roasted 

" 2 at 33c., " " 

" 3 at 30c., " " 
Their Flavoring Extracts are of the choicest 
quality. 

EPPS'S GOGOA 

% lb. packets, 14 lb. boxes secured in tin 
Special Agent for the Dominion : 

C. E. Colson, Montreal 



LAURENCE GIBB 

Provision Merchant, 

83 COLBORNE STREET, - TORONTO 

All kinds of Hog Products handled. Also Butter 
Cheese, Poultry, Tallow, Etc. 

PATENT EGG CARRIERS SUPPLIED. 
Good Prices paid for Good Dairy Butter. 

Meglaughlin, Marshall & Co,, 

Wholesale Provision Merchants, 
3 and 4 Corn Exchange, 

Manchester, 

Also at ' 

Liverpool and Glasgow. p» nO*l£> DCl 

Are prepared to receive Consignments of Eggs, 
Bacon, Hams, etc. Having been established more 
than 40 years, they are in connection with all the 
best buyers in the North of England. 

W. GIBBINS So CO., 

Commission and 

/Manufacturers' Agent, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



We are open for Consignments of Dried 
and Evaporated Apples, Beans, Peas, &c, 
or will take orders for packers and others. 

JAS. DICKSON & CO., 

26 WEST MARKET STREET, 
Provision and Commission Merchant? . 

Eggs, Butter, Hams, Lard, Bacon, Cheese, Dried 
Apples, Finnan Haddies, Dried Cod Fish, bought 
or sold on commission. Agents for all lines of 
Canned Corned Beef. Egg Carriers supplied. 

Butter is booming, at 19 to 22c. ; Eggs sell 
well, at 22 to 21c. for fresh, and 15 to 16c. for limed ; 
Dried Apples iu demand, at 5 to 5i4c; Green 
Apples dull; 1.00 to $2.00; Potatoes, 85 to 90c. per 
bag; Beans, 1.20 to $1.40; Poultry is still in good 
demand, Turkeys, 12 to 14c. ; Geese, 9to 10c. ; 
Chickens, 40 to 75c. ; Ducks, 50c. to $1 00 

Consignments of above 
Solicited 

J. Y. Young & Co. 

Strictly 
Commissions 



74 Front St., East 



TORONTO 



PARK, BLACKWELL & CO, 

(Limited.) 
— SUCCESSORS TO - 

J.A.S- ze\a.:r:k: & sonsr.. 

TOEOIQ'TO. 



Full lines of Superior Cured Hams, Break- 
fast Bacon, New Special Rolls, 
Beef Hams, Long Clear Bacon, 
Butter, Cheese, Lard, Eggs, 
Etc. 
Write for Price List. 



PUT 

TEXAS BALSAM 

I3ST STOCK 

The Great Hea'er for all kinds of wounds on 
Horses and Cattle. $3.00 worth only oosts you 
$1.80. Express prepaid. Cash with order. 
C. F. SEGSWOBTH, 

6 Wellington St. East, 
Sample 25c. postpaid. Toronto. 

S. K. MOVER, 

Commission Merchant 

And dealer in foreign and 

domestic fruits, fish, 

poultry, etc. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Oysters, Oyster Carriers, 
Smoked, Salt and Fresh 
Fish. Consignments and 
Orders solicited. 

76 Colborne St., 

Toronto, Ont. 

George MoWilliam. Frank Everist. 

MGWILUAM & EVERIST 

Fruit and Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 

TORONTO, ONT. 




FIGS, DATES, NUTS, 

ALMERIA GRAPES, Etc., 

Florida Oranges are now arriving in car lots, 
stock fine, also Messina Lemons. Will fill 
all orders at lowest possible price. 

J. Cleghorn & Son, 

94 Yonge St., TORONTO. 



Fancy Florida Oranges- 

Car arriving weekly. 

Car Messina Lemons— 

Just arrived. 



We are handling hest brands Bulk and Canned 
Oysters, Haddies— Portland and St. Johns, 
Fancy Bloaters and all kinds Fresh Fish, New 
Golden Dates, Figs, Nuts, etc. 



WILLIAM RYAN, 

PORK PACKER 

Toronto, Ont. 

HAMS, MESS PORK, 

BREAKFAST BACON, SHORT GUT, 

ROLLS, LARD. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



PURE CREAMERY BUTTER 

In lots of 5 tubs and upwards, price 23^ cts. per lb., cash ; single 
tubs 50 lbs. each, will be shipped as samples on receipt of $12. 

ZEIXIIPO'RTIEIR OIF ODRJE-AJMIEIRTr BUTTEE 

GUELPH, ONT 



JACKSON &HALLETT, 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



jmEKKK^imi^zmm®&8i2 




[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, and as prices are modified by both 
quantity and quality, the quotat ons eiven below 
and in our Prices Current necessarily take a wide 
range.] 

TORONTO MARKETS. 



Toronto, Jan. 19, 1893. 

GROCERIES. 

The distinguishing feature of this 
week's grocery trade is a more active 
business in sugar. The conviction that 
the price may go higher is sufficiently 
widespread, and coupled with the means 
to buy in advance of present require- 
ments, to support a fairly strong de- 
mand. Tea has not fully opened out, 
mainly because a tentative policy is re- 
lied on to bring advantages to buyers. 
Dried fruit is dull, and Malaga raisins 
are plentiful enough to be a cause of 
anxiety to some holders. Cannea goods 
are in better shape, and in good present 
demand. The trade in miscellaneous 
goods is reasonably active. Taken all 
in all, the wholesale grocery trade is 
much better than it was a year ago. In 
nearly everything prices are in better 
tone. Doubtless the abundance of snow 
and the continuance of weather bard 
enough to maintain sleighing, have been 
favorable factors. Milder weather 
might have done more in the way of im- 
provement, as it is probable the reac- 
tion from extreme mildness may have 
over-shot the mark. Collections are gen- 
erally satisfactory as collections 
go. Out-of-town dealers are prob- 
ably making fewer renewals than 
they were. The farmers are realizing 
good prices for butter, eggs, poultry, 
pork, and the grain market is looking 
up. These conditions are favorable to 
collections as well as to current business. 

COFFEE. 

Upon this market the conditions are 
rather constant. The demand fluctuates 
but little on either side of the line of a 
medium trade. The variations in price 
outside very slightly affect the volume 
of business done here. The market for 
Brazil coffees is still strong, and on spot 
the quotation runs from 20 to 21c. Mild 
coffees are as firm as ever. Green Java 
coffee is quoted at 25 to 30c. Padang 
coffee is 28 to 35c. Colory V.O.G. Javas 
are quoted at 40c. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

The amount of custom now presenting 
itself for business in dried fruit is very 
limited. There is no excess stock of staple 
goods in any local hands. Prices are 
for the most part steady. The views ex- 
pressed by reports of the outside currant 
market show that New York is selling 
on a lower basis than the fruit could now 
be bought at in Greece. The only easing 
in price is, therefore, on the part of New 
York holders. From Patras the latest 
advice reports an advance of (id. The 
price of barrel currants here is 5 3-4 to 
6c, according to quality. Heavy deliv- 
eries due at New York, along with liberal 
stocks already in store there, tend to the 
expectation of easy prices here, as no- 
body is heavily stocked, and if future 



buying can be done at a comparative 
advantage, retailers will probably reap 
the benefit. Valencia layers are not in 
free movement, but jobbers are not 
tempting trade by any offers below 5c. 
lor acceptable fruit. The majority hold 
out for 5 1-4C. London layers are quot- 
ed as low as $2.25, but there are lines 
not openly quoted, but available to the 
retailer at advantageous prices. It is 
possible to buy London layers and black 
baskets at a very slight advance, or 
probably without the encumbrance of 
any advance, on cost. Prunes are un- 
changed. They are firm, and appear to 
be in scant supply locally. Offers made 
some time ago by Toronto importers 
were turned down, and no subsequent 
overtures have been made, the standing- 
off attitude bein<r resorted to to see what 
it will yield. B's are quoted at S l-2c, 
U's at 7 1-2. There are some cheap 
bag figs offering, 4 1-2 being susceptible 
to buyers' influence. Nuts are inactive 
and call for nothing but quotations, 
which we give in Prices Current. 

RICE AND SPICES. 

The rice trade is a small and feature- 
less one. B rice is steady at 3 7-8 to 4c, 
Japan rice at 5 to 5 l-2c, according as 
the latter is home or foreign milled. 

There have been some slight advances 
outside in pepper, ginger and cloves. 
Upon this market there has been no 
change. The range for pepper is 10 to 
15c, for African ginger 16 to 18c, and 
for cloves 14 to 20c The spice trade 
generally is considered good for the 
month of January. 

SUGAR. 

The quantity of sugar leaving the re- 
fineries for distribution throughout the 
country is said to be the largest ever 
known for this time of the year. This 
indicates the state of the market, and 
shows that buyers are impressed with 
its strength. The quotation now made 
by jobbers is 4 3-4 to 4 7-8c for granu- 
lated. Yellows quote from a basis of 
lc lower than this. The firmness of the 
beet market gives the key note to the 
whole sugar situation, and the estimates 
of the shortage in the beet crop bring up 
the market. The refiners are .steadfast 
in their restriction of present prices to 
strictly present business, and offers for 
future delivery on the basis of current 
quotations are not accepted. Among job- 
bers there appears to be unusual \inan- 
imity in the maintenance of prices. They 
have evidently concluded not to urge 
business any faster than it will move 
under the impulse of essential market 
conditions. If the market promises to 
advance, retailers are supposed to be 
prompt to secure stock in anticipation 
of such advance, and wholesalers are just 
now in a temper that does not regard 
it as part of their duty to stimulate 
business by shading. 

Willett & Gray, New York, in their 
Weekly Sugar Statistical, say : 

Raws— During the week the market has 
not varied in quotations at New York or 
Philadelphia, but for Boston an advance 
of l-16c has been paid for a cargo of 
centrifugals. A strong tone has prevailed, 
and all invoices offered have been freely 
taken. The transactions in the local 
market, however, represent only small 
amount of the actual business, 'which 
includes large purchases made in the 
Cuba and other markets. At the close 
the limit of bids is 3 7-16c for 96 centri- 
fugals and 3c for 89 Muscovados, with 
light offerings, but with no indications 
of any immediate advance. The Cuba 
crop will soon be fully under way, and 
with more pressure to sell. Its size is 
not yet determined, but iess is said about 



a 10 per cent, deficiency. The Brazil cvop 
is being used more largely than usual at 
home, and shipments to the United States 
will be much curtailed. Accounts from 
the West Indies generally are of good 
average crops. 

Refined— A strong market and increas- 
ing demand most of the week kept refin- 
ers pushed to the utmost extent of pres- 
ent production to deliver orders without 
delay, and caused a moderate advance 
in several grades on which the demand 
runs most largely. Towards the close 
the orders fell off somewhat and the week 
closes quiet and steady. There is more 
or less enquiry all the time for foreign re- 
fined, which can be landed at l-8c per 
pound below American, but buyers do not 
seem willing to take the risk of impor- 
tation without a larger margin. There 
are no indications of any change in quo- 
tations except as to certain grades of 
soft sugars subject to special demand. 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

The sale of syrups is rather limited. The 
market has nothing that can be bought in a 
jobbing way at a lower price than 2y&c. 
From this to 3c. the grades in most request 
are quoted. 

Molasses has no special circumstances in 
its favor this week, and the trade is there- 
tore confined to the fitful minor business 
that is characteristic of it on this market. 
West Indies stock is sold at prices ranging 
from 30 to 35c. New Orleans molasses is 
30 to 50c. 

TEA. 

The tea market presents the same un- 
broken front to the buyer, despite the pro- 
longed suspension of business on wholesale 
account. There was an idea that the figures 
of sellers were too high to stand neglect. 
Orders were sparingly submitted, and some 
jobbers allowed themselves to run low, in the 
hipe that they would be able to establish a 
be; r influence by the time the demand 
should oegin on retad account. But tor the 
past three months the market has been 
steadily ascending. The position of Japan 
teas has improved remarkably, and stocks 
held in this country have been withdrawn to 
supply wants that have developed in New 
York and Chicago. There are no Japans of 
the last crop now available to the retailer at a 
lower price than 15X to 16c. Lower 
prices are not quoted on anything but 1891 
crop tea, which is obtainable at 14c. Con- 
gous are steady,and far from plentiful in low 
and medium grades, at from 15c. upwards. 
Young Hysons are in stock at prices rang- 
ing from 15c. upwards. Indian and Ceylon 
teas are in a very strong position. Higher 
prices are quoted at Calcutta, and the ship- 
ments from Colombo were unexpectedly 
short in December. The droughts of South- 
ern India are reported to have extended to 
Ceyion ; there are fewer flushings of leaf, 
and consequently a smaller crop is looked 
forward to. The cheapest Indian tea now 
on the speculative market is quoted at 8)4d. 
in London up to July. Nearly all Indians 
and Ceylons are now held in London. A 
price below what Indian tea would cost laid 
down here is still quoted by jobbers, namely 
17c. This is the lowest figure going for 
Pekoe Souchrngs in Indian and Ceylon teas. 
In common Pekoes 25c. is asked, for choice 
Pekoes 32 to 35c, for broken Pekoes 30 to 
40c, for broken orange Pekoes 35 to 50c. 

The following are McMeekin & Co.'s 
notes on Indian and Ceylon teas for the 
month of December : 

Indian — The offerings were 92,000 pack- 
ages, against 109 000 packages in the same 
month of 1891, The quality generally was 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 



HENDERSON 

& LIDDELL, 

3 Eastcheap, London, Eng. 

DEALERS IN 

Sugar, Dried and Green Fruit, 
Rice and Canned Goods 

Are prepared to enter into correspondence 
regarding purchase or consignments of all 
Canned Goods, Green Fruit, &c. 

H. & L. have been in business over 40 
years and have Travellers all over England. 
Highest References. S P 

The Standard 
of Excellence ! 

Always Reliable. 

Never Vary. 

If your wholesale 
grocer does not 
keep "Kent" Bot- 
tled Pickles, write 
direct to 

TIE KENT CANNING & PICKLING GO. 

CHATHAM, ONT. 

THE "Lion Brand" 

is so popular that UNSCRUPULOUS 
packers have adopted it. To prevent the 
public from being imposed on we have in 
addition lithographed the word "BOULTER" 
across the face of each label in a distinctive 
color. Look out for the word "BOULTER" 
if you want first class " canned goods." 

Bay of Quinte 

Canning Factories. 

PICTON and DEMORESTVILLE. 

W. COULTER & SONS, 

PROPRIETORS, 

PICTON, ONT. 




FINNAN- 



HADDIES 

Direct from Packers. 

BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDERS GET 
QUOTATIONS FROM 

L. H. DOBBIN, - MONTREAL. 



It always pays to 

BUY THE BEST 

Goods. Fresh Fruits and Vegetables can 
be had every day, by using the Lakeport 
Preserving Co's Canned Goods. All goods 
guaranteed. Try them once and you will 
use no other. 

Lakeport Preserving Co., 

Lakeport, Ont. 

Factories at Lakeport and Trenton 



"Nothing" succeeds like success." 

The sale of our 

BEAVER BRAND 

PICKLES 

INCREASED 

79 PER CENT. 

DURING THE LAST YEAR. 




Wishing all our Friends a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO, 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 

TORONTO. 



JVIAPliE PRODUCTS. 

Having large warehouses at Sherbrooke, the centre of the 
largest Maple product territory in the world. We offer to the trade, 
all Maple products of the finest quality, in quantities and packages 
suited to any locality. Special inducements on car lots. 

Address 

Sherbrooke Maple Product Co., 

Sherbrooke, P. Q., Canada. 




DAILEY'S 



Please try them. 
His boys eat them. 

Prepared by the 

Kingsville 
Preserving Co., 

(LIMITED.) 

KINGSVILLE, ONT. 



Boy 

Brand 

Tomatoes 





BUYERS ! 



OUR interests are identi- 
cal. It has paid us to pack 
a superior quality of Canned 
Goods. It will pay you to 
sell them. Our sales for 
1892 have doubled 1891. 
You may double yours by securing now, while the 
price is right and stock fresh and complete, a full 
assortment of our leading lines. 

All of which is guaranteed strictly Al. 

Delhi Fruit ^ Vegetable Canning Co., 
FACTORIES : Delhi, Ont, and I'm on the Lake, 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MARKETS. - Continued 

of a useful character, and above that of the 
corresponding month in the previous season. 
The auctions in the second week were heavy, 
and at that time the better sorts did not 
meet with so ready a demand; but, with this 
exception, all grades were distinctly firmer, 
and the month closes with higher prices, 
especially for ali teas under is. per lb. The 
average of public sale prices for the month 
was about ioXd. per lb. against 8#d. per 
lb. for the corresponding month last year. 
The imports were 17,353,000 lbs., and the 
deliveries 9,595,000 lbs., leaving in stock on 
31st Dec, 46,069,000 lbs. Although the im- 
ports in December show a very heavy total, 
and there is at the close of the year an 
unusually large quantity of tea unphnted in 
importers' hands, the available supply does 
not appear to be in excess of the probable 
requirements. 

Ceylon. — The offerings were 42,000 pack- 
ages, against 47,000 packages in the same 
month of 1891. The high level at which the 
month opened rather tended to discourage 
buyers, and, in consequence, the course of 
the market was slightly irregular through- 
out, and prices showed a downward tend- 
ency; but any decline observable was not 
material. The quality generally was not 
equal to that of earlier arrivals. The average 
of public sale prices for the month was 
io^d. per lb., against 9^d. per lb. for the 
corresponding month last year. The im- 
ports were 5,735,000 lbs., and the deliveries 
4,202,000 lbs, leaving in stock on 31st 
December, 12,738,000 lbs. 

4,600 packages of Java toas were offered, 
and met with good competition, there being 
more enquiry for them from the home trade 
owing to the higher prices for common 
Indians and Ceylons. For China teas, 
quotations were very firm for all the lower 
grades. 

MARKET NOTES. 

[Importers, wholesale merchants and manufac- 
turers should send any items intended for this 
department so that they may reach the head 
office not later than Wednesday morning. The 
editor will always welcome such information.] 

Davidson & Hay have Brooke's Crystal 
soap in stock. 

Smith & Keighley are offering a line 
of bag figs at very low prices. 

Sloan & Crowther have just received 
two more car loads of Little Chief toma- 
toes. 

D. TV. Port & Co. have received a car 
load of splendid white fish from Mani- 
toba. 

The prices of Japan teas have advanc- 
ed in New York 1 l-2c. since the first of 
December. 

The St. Lawrence Starch Company has 
advanced prices of Canada laundry to 
4c. The discounts remain as before. 

TV. T. Harris, Chatham, N.B., dealer in 
general merchandise, offers 200 cases 
canned lobsters, also dried cod of finest 
quality. 

A Toronto wholesale house received an 
enquiry from Chicago on Tuesday for a 
quotation on 3-lb. tomatoes. In the lat- 
ter city the price is $1.10. 

The lobster market is firm. It is re- 
ported that one large packer in the Mari- 
time Provinces has sold to English buy- 
ers the whole of his output for 1893. 

Eby, Blain & Co. have a few packages 
left of No. 1 fresh water herring. As the 
market is rapidly becoming bare of this 
fish, orders should be forwarded without 
delay. 

James Turner A Co. find the sales of 
Earn Lai's teas steadily Increasing. The 



5<i E 

While the best for all household use, has 
peculiar qualities for easy and quick 
washing of clothes. 

We sell ii ! So do all the best Wholesale Grocers in Canada, 

The St. Croix Soap Mfg Co., 

Branches : St. Stephen, N.B., 

MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO : Wright & Copp, 40 Wellington St. East. 
WINNIPEG: E. W. Ashley. 



trade find these goods always give satis- 
faction. The sale of one package always 
leads to repeats. 

P. C. Larkin & Co. report their Salado 
package tea to be meeting with excep- 
tional success, telephone and mail orders 
coming in freely from all parts every day. 

It is quite fashionable to serve Burn- 
ham's Clam Bouillon at afternoon teas, 
same as cocoa. Instantly prepared with 
hot water. It is very nourishing and 
strengthening. 

Eby, Blain & Co. are advertising in 
this week's GROCER Chase & Sanborn's 
" Seal" brand condensed coffee and milk. 
The reputation of these manufacturers is 
a guarantee of its quality. 

J. T. Sturgis, representing Francis D. 
Moulton & Co., New York, is visiting On- 
tario in the interests of Eureka Salt. 
Mr. Sturgis attended the creamery con- 
vention held last w^eek in Harriston. 

TV. H. Gillard & Co., of Hamil- 
ton, are offering new "Sair" dates very 
low, viz., 4 3-4. These goods were ship- 
ped in error to Canada, and are being 
sold much below market prices. 

At London J. TV. Jones on Friday sold 
the stock of R. TVeatherell, of Oil City, 
general merchandise, Insolvent, to TV. T. 
Trapp, of that place, for 50 1-2 cents 
on the dollar. The stock was valued at 
$6,757.87. 

The manufacturers of canned meats 
have advanced their prices. The prices 
of the Canadian Meat Canning Co. have 
been put up 10c. on one's and two's, but 
jobbers continue to sell at former quota- 
tions to the retail trade. 

The Pure Gold Manufacturing Co. are 
putting on the market a new blend of 
coffee named the Golden Crown, which is 
likely to meet with a hearty reception 
from the trade. It is put up in an attrac- 
tive and saleable form in 2-lb. tins only. 

Perkins, Ince & Co. are offering some 
genuine bargains in London layers and 
black baskets. 

Samples of new crop Japan rice now at 
hand are generally described as of very 
excellent quality and calculated to at- 
tract prompt attention. Advices from 
primal points of late have shown some 
irregularity, and the last cable communi- 



cations report ruling rates at about 5c. 
per 100 pounds under the cost of previous 
export deals, but that was due mainly to 
reduced freight charges and irregularity 
in exchange. Holders of rice in Japan 
were sustaining full former figures.— N. 
Y. Commercial Bulletin. 

Representatives of the Halifax and 
Moncton sugar refineries have protected 
to Mr. Bowell.Minister of Trade and Com- 
merce, against the abolition of the dis- 
criminating duties upon sugar and mo- 
lasses imported through the United 
States. They say the action taken by 
the government in abolishing those du- 
ties is contrary to the genius and designs 
of the national policy, and will divert a 
large amount of trade from Halifax and 
St. John to United States ports. The 
sugar men say it is wrong to allow for- 
eign cities to be built up by means of 
Canadian trade. The complaint of the 
United States Government against the 
duties in question is the only reason giv- 
en by the Ministers for abolishing them. 



CANNED GOODS. 

TORONTO. 

A slightly better feeling is perceptible in 
the canned goods market. Orders for cur- 
rent needs are numerous and of a good 
average magnitude, showing that consump- 
tion is stimulated by the easy prices going. 
There is a pretty well defined btlief that the 
unusually big pack will be crowded down by 
our population before renewal from the fac- 
tories is due, and the very low prices are 
depended on for this result. An inquiry 
from Chicago this week points to the pos- 
sibility of the difference between Canadian 
and United States prices affording relief 
through exportation. It is almost a tempta- 
tion to our packers to sacrifice on that mar- 
ket to raise prices here. Assorted vegetables 
are steady at 85c. to $1. Gallon apples are 
mostly held at $2,but as the fruit in its na- 
tural state is still cheap and plentiful, there 
is little demand for the canned product. 
Salmon is quiet but firm, most jobbers 
wanting $1.50, but $145 is known to be not 
unacceptable if a sale of any importance is 
involved. Lobster is firm and unchanged at 
from $1.80 upwards. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



TORONTO, - - Dec. 30, '92. 

we-payING-ahe 



4 



3 

-rC. 

4" F.O. B. 



FOR 

BRIGttT--DRY--SOUND 
NEW CROP 

DRIED APPLES. 



we BUYING are 



N E W 



- DRIED APPLES - 

ADDRESS 

STANWAY & BAYLEY, 

42 FRONT ST., EAST, TORONTO. 



-TERMS- 

PRICE~Good for one week from 
date, for not exceeding 10 Bar 
rels from any one shipper. Lar- 
ger lots subject to continuation 
before shipment. All others can 
be made without advice, but 
subject terms stated. 

SIGHT DRAFT-Or local payor 
ders honoured, 10 days after 
shipment made. 

QUALITY-Bright, dry, and sound 
new -crop stock. 




Daniel G. Trench & Co., 

CHICACO, ILL. 

CANNING FACTORY OUTFITTERS. 

GENERAL AGENTS FOR 

SPRACUE MFC. CO., FARNHAM, N. Y 
CANNING MACHINERY of all kinds. 




THEY ARE RIGHT. 

We have packed all kinds of Vegetables, Fruits, 
etc , and our CANNED GOODS are in the hands 
of the wholesalers. 

Our Factory New Throughout. 

The Strathroy Canning and Pre- 
serving Co., Ltd., 

STRATHROY, - ONT. 



Todhunter, Mitchell & Co., 

DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 

HIGH GRADE COFFEES, 

Old Government Java, Arabian Mocha, Plantation Ceylon, Maraeaibo 

and Santos. 

Grocers draw trade by selling; their FAVORITE EXCELSIOR BLEND. 
RELIABLE ROASTING BY PATENTED PROCESS. TORONTO. 



English 
Malt 

Six GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

GILLARD'S Specialties 

High Class, English Made, 

IXSTZE^vT" Pickles and "HSriE^T" Sauce. 



cc 



GILLARD & CO.,T 



Wholesale Grocers in the Dominion. 



"J ersey B rand" C ondensed Milk. 

It is guaranteed Pure and Unskimmed. 

An excellent food for Infants. 

We make only the one quality — THE BEST. 

Buy only the JERSEY BRAND for all pur 

poses. Sold by Grocers, Outfitters and others. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FORREST CANNING CO'Y, 

HALIFAX, N.S. 
STANWAY & BAYLEY, Agents, Toronto. 





W. A. Carson. 



R. B. Morden. 



J. Aiming 



BELLEVILLE CANNING CO. 



-PACKERS OF THE- 



"Queen Brand" 

Fruits and Vegetables. 

All our goods are packed with the greatest care and clean- 
liness, and as we are on the market to stay we will only 



put out 

FIRST-CLASS GOODS. 

We respectfully ask the trade to recom- 
mend this brand to their customers. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MA RKBTS— Cbnteiued 

PETROLEUM. 

A steady market, with a slight decrease in 
business, incidental to the growing daylight, 
is about all there is to take note of in a mar- 
ket report. The quotation for Canadian re- 
fined continues to be 14 to \&, l /zc 
BUTTER AXD CHEESE. 

Large rolls are in declining supply and 
are appreciating in value. The price paid 
now is 17 to 18c. for first class stock, while a 
cent lower is touched for anything that is not 
of prime quality. The country is turning out 
a very limited supply of butter in any form. 
Tubs of good table butter are worth 18 to 
20c, and grades of dairy tub that'aie in re- 
quest for bakers' purposes worth 1 5c. Cold 
weather, though favorable to delivery in good 
condition appears to be unfavorable to pro- 
duction and to marketing. The capacity of 
this market is much beyond the compass of 
the supply even at current prices, for all the 
really good butter goes very rapidly, and 
lower qualities are taken very often in sheer 
default of a sufficient supply of choice stock. 

Cheese is very firm. Late fall makes are 
selling in a jobbing way at 1 1 l / z to 12c, and 
for late summer and early fall cheese the 
quotation is uc. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Variety in quality still causes the 
range between lowest and highest prices 
to be a wide one. Choice handpicked are 
jobbed at $135. Lower grades are quoted 
all the way down to $1.1 5. 

Dried Apples — Buyers are paying 4^c, 
and the jobbing price is 5#c 

Evaporated Apples — The market is 
brighter, but prices do not ascend. The 
price paid to sellers is "]%c, and in a job- 
bing way resales are made at 8c. 

EGGS — Strictly fresh eggs are 25c. a dozen, 
and are very scarce. Limed eggs are 16c. 
Cold storage eggs are firm at 19 to 20c. 

Honey — There is no change in the dull 
honey market, which is well stocked with 
extracted to sell at 7 to 10c. The price of 
sections is 13 to 15c. 

Hops — The price at which business has 
been done this week is 18 to 20c. for last 
crop stock. Buyers are not eager to pay 
these figures, and are not anticipating future 
wants. 

Onions — Cold weather has reduced trade 
almost to the vanishing point. The price 
quoted is still $2.25 to $2.50. 

Potatoes — Offerings are few, as well 
on account of haid weather as on ac- 
count of firm views on the part of growers. 
Cars are 75 to 76c. Out of store lots are 
85c. 

Dressed Poultry— Receipts are almost 
nil. Turkeys bring 12c, geese 8}4 to 9c, 
chickens 45 to 60c, ducks 70 to 90c. 

GREEN FRUIT. 

The extreme cold of the last week has had 
a very adverse influence on the fruit trade. 
Sales of every kind have been rather few, 
small and far between to satisfy the jobbers. 
Prices are as follows : Oranges — Valencias 
$4.50, Jamaicas (boxes) $2.75 to $3, Floridas 
$3 to $3.50, lemons $3 lo $3.50; Malaga 
grapes, nearly done, at $8; jananas not in 
stock; cranberries $10.50 to $11 for choice, 
$1 for Canadian baskets; pineapples 20 to 
25c; cocoanuts 5J£ to 6c; apples $1.50 to 
$2.85; grape fruit 6c. 

HOGS AND PROVISIONS. 

The almost unparalleled value of hogs has 
had the effect of closing out the demand on 
packers' account, and for the time being 
none of the hogs that come to market are 
allowed to go to the butchers. The price 



rose as high as $8 90, and of course that 
figure for raw material would almost certainly 
preclude business in products. All hog pro- 
ducts are very high and firm. 

Bacon — Long clear io>£ to uc. Smoked 
backs are 12^ to 13c, bellies I3^c, rolls 

IOC. 

Hams— Are 13c. 

Lard — Pure Canadian is no in tubs, 
and i2j£c. in pails. Compound is 10 to 
ioj£c. 

Barrel Pork — U. S. heavy mess is $20 
to $21. Canadian short cut is $21.50 to 
$22. 

Dressed Meats— Beef feres are 5 to 6c. 
hindquarters 7 to 8)£c, veal b}4 to 8c, mut- 
ton d]/ z to 7c, lamb 7c to 8>£c 
SALT. 

The sale of salt is not up to the volume of 
corresponding periods in former years. The 
pork packers are unable to render the same 
strength to the demand as it used to have, 
for the packers will be obliged to curtail 
their output very much on account of the 
shortage in hogs. The break in the salt 
combine affects the price of barrel salt more 
than any other line. The following are pre- 
sent prices in car lots : — Barrels $1, coarse 
65c, dairy $1, quarter sacks 40 to 45c, com- 
mon 75c, rock salt $12 per ton. 

FISH AND OYSTERS. 

Trade in fish has not yet rallied as it was 
expected to do since hogs rose in price and 
the cold weather supervened. Stocks of fresh 
fish are full enough for all requirement? that 
are signified or appear to be in prospect. 
The prices are as follows : 7c. for trout and 
ordinary whitefish, 7^c for Manitoba 
whitefish, 4c per lb. or $2 to $2.25 per hund- 
red for Lake herring, 10c for mackerel, 13c 
for B. C. salmon, yc. for smelts, 5 to 5jic 
for haddock, 4 to 4j4c. for market cod, 7c 
for steak cod, 4c (or flounders, 6>^c for 
skinned and boned codfish, $6, for Labra- 
dor herring, $5 to $5.50 for shore herring, 
11 to i2J^c for Digby herring, 4c for 
boneless fish, 7 to 8c for boneless cod, 
oysters $1.25. 

MONTREAL MARKETS. 

Montreal Jan 19th 1893. 

[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, and as prices are modified by both quan- 
tity and quality, the quotations given below, and 
in our Prices Current, necessarily take a wide 
range.] 

GROCERIES. 

The grocery market lias shown a sat- 
isfactory degree of activity during the 
week, and although the volume has not 
been of such wide dimensions as the pre- 
vious week, the movement is still large 
and far more general in its character. 
It was jobbers who were buying before ; 
now it is the retailers who are making 
their wants felt, and everything makes 
it plain that their supplies are very 
light. With this demonstrated theretore, 
and the light supplies of leading staples 
in first hands here, it is natural to look 
for a firm tone to values, and this is the 
case. In fact, the general tendency of 
the grocery market is to a higher level 
of volume on almost everything. Molass- 
es and sugar have already advanced ; tea 
is stiffening under remarkably light sup- 
plies, so that there is nothing but firm- 
ness to report. Payments are somewhat 
unsatisfactory, but after the first couple 
of weeks of the new year better things 
are expected. 

SUGAR. 

The improved demand noted for sugar 
in our last report has been well main- 
tained, and if refiners were willing it is 
likely that they could book orders a con- 



siderable way ahead. The position £f 
the raw sugar market, however, predis- 
poses them against doing so, and they 
are following a conservative course in 
this respect. A fair quantity of refined 
has been moved, however, from the refin- 
eries at 4 5-8, while round lots of bright 
yellows have been sent out at 4c. to 
4 l-8c, and lower grades at 3 1-2 to 

3 3-4c. A gratifying fact also is the good 
demand that jobbers are receiving both 
on local and outside account, the move- 
ments in this connection being of fair 
proportions also. Advices from all prim- 
ary centres continue firm. 

SYRUPS. 

The advance referred to last week in Bar- 
bados molasses is firmly maintained, and 
we hear of a round lot of Barbados 
changing hands at 34c. Stocks here are 
as we have pointed out before, very 
light, and holders consider their prop- 
erty very good, with the prospects in 
the immediate future of still higher 
prices. 

Syrups have been moving fairly well 
also, at a range of 1 3-4c. to 2 l-4c. per 
lb., according to quality. American 
stock has changed hands at 22c. to 23c. 
per gallon. 

TEAS. 

Jobbers report orders from the coun- 
try as showing a better volume, and 
everything points to the fact that stocks 
in retailers' hands throughout the coun- 
try are exceptionally low. With the light 
stocks in first hands here, therefore, es- 
pecially of low grades, a strong mar- 
ket is the natural sequence, and the tea 
market is certainly strong. In addition 
to the round lots that were moved last 
week, we hear of further business of the 
sort, so that it is evident that jobbers 
also are urgently in want of fresh sup- 
plies. Low grade Japans in straight 
wholesale lots have changed hands at 
12c. to 14 l-2c, according to grade, and 
a round lot of mediums brought 17 l-2c, 
while fine to finest has sold all the way 
from 22c. to 31c. Chicago buyers took 
two or three lots, and a quantity com- 
prising 160 packages were placed in Wis- 
consin. On the whole the week in tea has 
been brisk and encouraging. 

COFFEES. 

Coffee has shared in the attention de- 
voted to tea, but owing to light sup- 
plies here the movement has not assum- 
ed large dimensions. The indications all 
favor prices being maintained, so that 
holders are very independent in their 
views. We quote Jamaica 18 1-2 to 20c, 
Maracaibo 22 to 23c, Rio 20 to 21c, 
Java 26 1-2 to 29c, and Mocha 27 to 
30c 

SPICES. 

Spices are strong and upward in ten- 
dency also, while a fair demand i haa 
been experienced. We quote black pepper 
firm at 7 l-2c, cloves 7 1-2 to 8 l-2c, 
and nutmegs 50 to $1, according to qual- 
ity. 

RICE 

The rice market is shady and unchang- 
ed, and we quote standard $3.85 to 
$4.25, higher grades $5 to $7. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

Business has not shown much change 
in dried fruit during the week, but a few 
straight wholesale parcels of off-stalk 
Valencia good seconds have sold at 

4 l-2c, and prime 5c net 30 days. The 
common stock offering here is not want- 
ed and cannot be given away, so that it 
looks very much as though the fate pre- 
dicted by THE GROCER at the time of 
its receipt here would be verified. Valen- 
cia layers have furnished quite a few 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



10 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

TORONTO. 

Rising ideas on the part of millers are not 
productive of an increase in business, as 
sellers have resorted to this course to influ- 
ence the market but have only succeeded in 
diminishing their sales. The export trade 
is now at a low ebb. Prices are as they were 
for flour, but have advanced on bran and 
► shorts. 

Flour. — City millers' and dealers' prices 
are : Manitoba patents, $4.60; strong bakers' 
$4.25 ; white wheat patents, $4.50 ; straight 
roller, $340; low grades, per bag, $1.25 to 
$1.50. 

Car prices are : Toronto freights — Mani- 
toba patents, $4. 30 to$44o ; Manitoba 
strong bakers' $3.75 to $4.90; Ontario 
patents, $3.25 to $3.50 ; straight roller, $3. 1 15 
to $3.30 ; extra, $2.60 tc $2.70; low grades, 
per bag, Ji.oo to $1.25. 

Meal— Oatmeal is $3.80. Cornmeal is 
$3- So- 
Feed — Bran is $12, shorts is $12.50 
to $13 mixed feed $22, feeding corn 57 to 
58c, oats 30 to ?ic. 

Hay— Baled timothy is $9. 

Straw — Is steady at $5. 50 to $6. 

MONTREAL. 

There has been a larger business in flour 
all round, and although holders are asking 
somewhat higher prices they do not care to 
let a sale go past them. Local dealers and 
brokers are quietly laying in stocks, and 
show a disposition to anticipate wants much 
further ahead, which shows plainly that they 
think values are down to bed rock. We 
quote the following : — Winter wheat $4.25 
to $4.50; spring patent, $3.25 to $4.50 ; 
straight rollers $3.55 to $375. extra $3.20 to 
$3.25 ; superfine $2.65 to 2.90; city strong 
bakers! $4. 10 to 0.00 ; strong bakers $4.00 
to $4.10. 



ST. 



JOHN, N. B., 
The higher prices for flour has caused a 
little more activity for that commodity and 
as the market is likely to be firm, a still bet- 
ter demand is anticipated, it is selling here 
now for less than it can be landed at. Quo- 
tations given are Manitoba $5.20 to $5.30 ; 
High Grade Ontario $4 35 to $4 50 ; Medium 
Patents $4.20 to $4 30 ; Oatmeal is reported 
higher ; Corn Meal steady at $2.75 to $2.85; 
Feed an advance of $1 per ton is reported. 



GS 



Choice Natural 

in bags 

about 55 lbs. 



10 lb. boxes 

Choice Eleme 

4 Row 



4k 
10k 



. . (lenies Bros . . 

Toronto 







FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters translated from or written in any 
foreign language. 


OATMEAL 


J. H. CAMERON, 10 Front St. E. 

The Western Milling Company 

(Limited.) 

REGINA, ASSA. 

Manufactuiers of all kinds of 

High Grade Flours, 


Dominion Mills. 

LONDON. 

Exoelsior Mills. 

MITCHELL. 

Write or wire for Thomson's Brands 

ROLLED OATS, PINHEAD & STANDARD MEALS. 

SPLIT PEAS, POT BARLEY, CORN MEAL, ETC. 

All kinds of Chop and Mill Feed. 


Hungarian Patent, 
and Strong Bakers. 

We also handle Hard Wheat Oats, and 
other kinds of feed. 

We would solicit the patronage of the 
Millers' of the Eastern Provinces, wanting 
Manitoba Hard Wheat. All orders en- 
trusted to us will be carefully and promptly 
filled. 


ceNeral crain dealer. 

Highest price paid for Oats and Peas in car lots. 

WALTER THOMSON, 

BRANDON ROLLER MILLS. 

Brandon, Man. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hungarian, Patent, Strong* Bakers 


Correspondence Solicited. 


- FLOUR - 


Embro 
Oatmeal 
Mills 

D. E. ROSS, - • EMBRO, 0NT. 

A CHOICE QUALITY OF 

Roller, Standard and Granulated 


Also Oatmeal, Rolled Oats, Rolled Oatmea 

Granulated and Standard. 

Dealers in all kinds of grain and feed. 

ALEXANDER, KELLY & COY, 

PROPRIETORS 


N.WENGER&BROS., 

AYTON, ONT. 

- - MILLERS - - 

(Hungarian Process) 


Oatmeal 

IN BARRELS, HALF BARRELS OR BACS. 

Selected WHITE OATS only used. For prices 
of Oatmeal orOathullsin Car-loadsorless quan- 
tities, write or wire, and will reply promptly. 
Can ship via Canadian Pacific or d rand Trunk 
Railways. 


BRANDS : 

KLEBER, MAY BLOSSOM. 

AGENTS = 
J. L. SMITH & SON, - Montreal. 
EPHRAIM ERB, - Halifax. 



R. M. PINCOMBE. 



W. W. SUTHERLAND. 



Phone. 1766 



STRATHROY OATMEAL AND CORNMEAL MILLS. 

Pincombe & Sutherland, 

STEATHEOT, OICTT-A-IRIO- 

Manufacture by the latest improved process 

The Celebrated White Eagle Brand of Boiled Oatmeal, 

also Standard and Granulated Oatmeal, CORNMEAL, Dessicated Rolled Wheat and 
Wheat Germ, put up in barrels, half barrels and bags. Write or wire us for samples and 
prices. 

N.B.— The only mills putting up Rolled Oatmeal in Cotton Bags. 




20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MONTREAL Mark tit Continued. 

sales at 6 to 6 l-4c. in round lots, a par- 
cel of 500 boxes fetching that range. 

Currants are quiet and firm at 5 1-4 
to 6c, according to quality. The great 
bulk of the stock here is controlled by 
one firm, and anyone who wants sup- 
plies have to pay the price. 
NUTS. 

Business in nuts has been moderate, but 
prices are nominally unchanged. We quote; 
Pecans i itoi2>^c.,Terragonaalmondsi6^c., 
Grenoble walnuts 13% to I4j4c, filberts io to 
ioj^c, Ivica i4}ic, Brazil 15c, marbots 
\7. x /zQ., cocoa nuts $3. So to $4.50 per bag of 
ioo for old, new $5 to $5.50. 
FRUIT. 

The demand for oranges has been some- 
what better this week and prices are steady 
at the following : Fancy Floridas $3.25 to 
$3.50 Valencias $400 to $4.25 Messinas $2.- 
50 to $2.75 Ja...acia in barrels $<; to $6. 
Mandnals $4 in boxes and $2.25 in half 
boxes. 

The continued cold weather has improved 
the demand for lemons and a fair business 
has transpired at the following : Messina 
$3.30 to $3 50, prime $2.75 to $3.00, common 
$2. 00 

There is a fair call for figs and the market 
Is steady to firm at 5^ to 6c. in bags. 

Dates meet a good demand at 5>^ to 6c. 
in boxes. 

Spanish onions are steady at 80c. to $1 
per crate, red and yellow stock in barrels, 
$2 to $2 25 

FISH. 

The fish market generally is firm, both for 
pickled and smoked fish. We quote : Had- 
dock 4:., cod 3 to 3>£c., steak cod 4^ to 5c, 
lake trout 7c, white fish 7 to 7}4c., pickerel 
or dore 8c; dried cod, $5.50; No. 1 green 
cod, $550; B. C. salmon, $13 per brl. ; La- 
brador salmon, $13 to $14; No. 2 mackerel, 
$14 per brl.; do. $7 per half brl. ; Labrador 
herring, $5 25 to $5.50 per brl.; C.B. and N. 
S. herring, $5.25 per brl.; tommy cods, $2 to 
$2.2r per brl. ; fresh herring, $1.85 per hun- 
dred. 

APPLES. 

The apple market tails utterly in develop- 
ing any improvement. Stocks both here and 
in the west are ample and holders hardly 
know what to do with them. That they will 
concede a good deal is attested by the fact 
of sales made to California buyers at $3 de- 
livered, which is less than first cost at the 
orchard. On spot here $2.25 is certainly the 
extreme figure obtainable for a car lot. 
POTATOES. 

Potatoes are firm, two cars selling on the 
track here at 90c, and we quote round lots 
firm at 90 to 95c per bag. 

DRESSED POULTRY 

The market has been firmly maintained, 
all receipts being steadily absorbed. We 
quote: Turkeys, 1 1 % to 12c for choice, 
and ordinary io_j£ to lie; dry picked chick- 
ens, 8 to 9c. ; fowls, 5>£ to 6>^c.; geese 6% 
to 7^c,and ducks 9 to 10c The last named 
are very scarce. 

DRESSED HOGS. 

Dressed hogs continue firm and in light 
supply, in fact the special reference made to 
the situation last week is as apt to-day as it 
was then. We quote $8.75 to $9 as a range 
forcarlots. A caseisreportedwhere$8.75was 
offered for one car and refused, the holder 
wanting $8.77, while quotations from the 
west to operators here now are nearly equal 
to $9 laid down in Montreal. The ordinary 



jobbing demand is good on a basis of $9 to 
$925. 

PROVISIONS. 
There is a fair business doing in provisions 
but the market on the whole is quiet. The 
tone is very firm however. Canadian short cut 
is very strong, being now held at 21 to 22c. 
We quote as follows : Canadian short cut, 
per brl. $21 to $22 ; Mess pork, Western, 
new, per brl $21 to $22.00 ; Hams, city 
cured, per brl. i2>£ to 13c. ; Lard, Canadian, 
in pails io^ toioj^c. ; Bacon, per lb., \iy% 
to 12c. ; Lard, com, refined, per lb., 9 to 

EGGS. 

A hrisk export demand on American ac- 
count has sprung up for eggs since our last, 
and the market is very firm in consequence. 
Some five car loads go out this week to New 
York and Boston, but stocks here are too 
small to permit of much more being shipped, 
as it is all wanted on home account. Mon- 
treal limed are now quoted at 20 to 21c, 
while held fresh are firm at 23 to 24c. No 
southern American eggs are expected here 
for some time yet, as the receipts at the 
western and southwestern markets are light 
and dealers say that none can be brought to 
Canada until prices drop considerably. 
BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

Butter continues quiet but firm, with a 
moderate demand on local account. We quote 
creamery, 22 to 23c; Townships 20 to 22c; 
Morrisburg andBrockville 18 to 19c; West- 
ern dairy 17 to 18c 

Cheese has been brisk in an export way, 
and now holders want fully %c. more. About 
10,000 boxes have been moved during the 
week, making some 20,000 since the first of 
the yea, and now 40,000 is an outside esti- 
mate for the stock remaining on spot. We 
quote export prices from 11 to uj£c 



ST\ JOHN, N. B., MARKETS. 

St. John, N. B., Jan. 19, 1893. 

GROCERIES. 

Very little if any change in groceries. 
Retailers report an improvement chiefly on 
account of better travelling, as the recent 
snow has greatly improved the roads and 
given our country cousins a chance to do 
their buying here, which also helps the whole- 
saler. Collections are quite up to expecta- 
tions, and prospects for further improvement 
encouraging. 

Sugar — The very firm tone of the sugar 
market has caused a more general demand 
than for some time, and dealers are not very 
anxious to give quotations, which at present 
are : Granulated, 4 40 to 4%c. ; yellows, 3^ 
to 3^c; extra, 3% to 3?4c. 

Teas — A better demand is noticed for 
fair to medium grades. 

Dried Fruits— Are without any special 
feature, a fair trade and no change in values. 
Off-stalk 5J^ to 6c, Valencia layers 6% to 
7c, dates i,% to 5c, prunes 7 to 8c, dried 
apples 6 to 6^c, evaporated apples 9 to 
9/^c. 

Eggs — The market is firm, but small 
quantity offering, which is quickly bought 
up at prices from 21 to 23c. 

Butter — A very limited supply, and 
prices likely to be higher, is selling at 19 to 
21c. 

Cheese — Steady demand at regular prices 
io^ - to 11c. 

Fish — The cond tion of the market is un- 
altered, large stocks are held with small in- 



quiry for all kinds of dry and pickled fish. 
Fresh smoked Haddies are higher at b% to 
6#c. 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 



Advertisements for assistants in retail and 
wholesale houses, under this head, free. 

SALESMAN WANTED- A GOOD GROCERY 
hand ; one who is acquainted with general 
trade ; must be sober and well recommended ; 
no other need apply. Address C. Moore, Orillia. 

WANTED-BY NOV. 1ST-ENERGETIO, Ex- 
perienced salesman for general store ; well 
up in dry goods ; not afraid of work ; state 
salary ; muse have Al references. Address Rox 
Mi, Woodstock, Ont. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Advertisements inserted under this heading 
one cent per word each insertion. 

WANTED— 1,C 00,010 LBS. EVAPORATED AND 
sun dried apples, for which highest cash 
prices will be paid, delivered on cars. Special 
arrangements with large dealers. Send samples, 
stating quantity, etc., promptly to Michael Do vie 
& Co., Exporters and Jobbers. Evaporated and 
Dried Fruits, Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

GOOD BUSINESS CHANCE.— FOR SALE— 
General Store, Building and Stock, Dwell- 
ing House and Grain Elevator, at Kippen, on 
London, Huron and Bruce R. R. Weil situa- 
ted in an excellent section and enjoys a splendid 
patronage. For further particulars apply to D. 
Wei3mifler, Kippen, Ont. 

SITUATION WANTED. 

WANTED SITUATION — BY YOUNG MAN, 
in the wholesale grocery and provision 
trade, as an assistant or traveller. Ten years 
experience in London, England. Will take 
small wages to commence. Good references. 
G. W. G. D., Oak Lake, Man. 

YOUNG MAN WITH TEN YEARS EXPERI- 
enoe in grocery lines wishes to secure posi- 
tion in general store in country. Good refer- 
ences. F. W. B , Canadian Grocer. 

The pure INDIAN TEA of 

KEMBLE & CO., 

Calcutta, India, 

Is "Second to None" for Purity, Strength, 
and Flavor. TRY IT. 



A. DAVIDSON, c 



Representative 
48 Front St. East, Toronto. 



GENTLEMEN :— 

At close of stock-taking we find 
our stock of goods much larger 
than ever before, and all well 
bought. Our boys are out again ; 
gladden their hearts with the big- 
gest order you can and it will 
have our prompt attention. 



The Snow Drift Co., 

BRANTFORD. 



It Pays to 

keep a 
Stock of 



PERRIN'S COUGH DROPS 



Write for quotations to 
D. S. PERRIN & CO., 
LONDON, CANADA; 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 



FAMOUS 

" STAR " 

Sugar Cured Meats 

Mild, Sweet, Delicious Flavor. 

All live dtalers have them. 

Be sure you have fresh stock 



F. W. FEARMAN, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



ESTABLISHED 1851 



JUST RECEIVED 

4,500 Boxes 

Valencia Raisins 

WRITE FOR OUR PRICES. 

N. QUINTAL & FILS, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

274 St. Paul Street, Montreal. 



BALFOUR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF TEAS 



-AND- 



WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

HAMILTON. 



WESTERN ONTARIO AGENTS FOR THE 

Irish Mustard. 

Cherry's DUBLIN Mustard is guaranteed ab- 
solutely PURE, and sold cheaper than the com- 
pound Send for Prices. 



Special Tea 
Sale 



During this ^ontl? ^e 
Tjave becibeb to cut fye 
prices on all our ^eas 
qti6 )p\\\ styob' tlje trabe 
some splenbib lines at 
from 10 per cent, to 
1 5 per cent, belol^ 
usual prices 



Don' fail to get our Prices 
and Samples 



J. w. lamc * (0. 



59, 61 and 63 

FRONT ST., E. 

Cor. Church 



COOKING FIGS. 

In Bags about 50 lbs. each. 
Fine Quality and Cheap. 

Sloan & Crowther, 

W HOLESALE GROCERS, 

I 9 Front St. E., Toronto. 

lull 

Our shipments now arriving ex S. S. Ar- 
dengorm and Broomhaugh, were purchased 
at the lowest point. 

Layers, very choicest quality. 

Best value in market. 



A 



35 and 37 Front St. East, 

TORONTO, - ONT. 

— : We are offering a : : — 

Blended Tea45£ 



Lb. 



For Strength and Flavor it is Unequalled. 

Ask our Travellers to show it, or 
write us for Samples. . . 




Smith and 

Keighley 

9 Front 8t. E., Toronto. 



TEAS - - 



A SPECIALTY. 



PERKINS, INCE & Co., 

41-43 Front St. East, 
TORONTO. 



JOHN BURGESS & SON 



SAUCE 

AND 



PICKLE 

MANUFACTURERS, 

\f\"7 OTDAHin Corner of the Savoy 
lUl UlliAilU Steps, London, W.C 



Vide Sir Walter Scott's "St. 
Ronan's Well," Chaps. XVI. and 

XXX. 
Lord Byron's " Beppo," VIII. 

EDWARD ADAMS 

& CO. 

Importers of Teas 



-AND- 



Wholesale Grocers 

LONDON, ONT. 

SPECIAL BRAND TEA. 

LOOK OUT FOR 

GrO^JT 

JAPAN TEA 
Nothing equal to it at the price. 
See our travellers. 

Write for samples and prices. 

THOS. KINNEAR & CO. 

Wholesale Grocers, 

49 Front Street East, 
TOBOnSTTO. 

Elliott Marr& Co.. 

Importers of Teas 



-AND- 



Wholesale Grocers. 



LONDON, ONT. 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



M mmmfflmfwm^ 



Bagter's 

Nonpareil Jellies, 

All Flavors 




Bagter's 

Jams, Jellies, 

Marmalade 



IMPORTANT 



Having bought out the Stock and goodwill of Messrs. 
Tees, Wilson & Co, we intend giving our customers 
some bargains during the next two weeks. Special value 
in Syrups See our travellers before buying, or write us 
for samples and quotations , 



CAVERHILL. ROSE HUGHES & CO. r Montrea 



tfiUiluiWlU^^^ 



ft 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 



SALES MADE OR PENDING. 

J. Pentney, grocer, Barrie, Ont., has 
sold out to J. Addison. 

E. Houle & Co., grocers, Montreal, have 
sold out to , Agincourt. 

Samuel Kedy, grocer, Arnprior, Ont., 
has sold out to D. McPherson. 

J. H. Paquin, grocer, Montreal, is ad- 
vertising hie business for sale. 

The genera] store stock in the estate 
of K. Parker, Hillsdale, Ont., is sold. 

The stock of J. F. Copeland, grocer, 
Toronto, is advertised for sale by tender. 

J. E. Morrison, grocer and confection- 
er, Aylmer, Ont., has sold out to Tibbits 
& Son. 

The stock of L. Woodcock, grocer and 
fruit dealer, Cobourg, Ont., is advertised 
for eale by auction. 

The general store stock of Win. H. Leef, 
Orillla, Ont., is advertised for sale by auc- 
tion on the 24th inst. 

The grocery and crockery stock of J. 
A. Lockhart, Owen Sound, Ont., is ad- 
vertised for sale by auction. 

Asa Hoyt, grocer and waggon maker, 
Grafton, Ont., has sold out his grocery 
business to J. Gillard & Son. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Charles Fleischmann is registered pro- 
prietor in the firm Fleischmann & Co., 
manufacturers of compressed .yeast, 
Montreal. 

DEATHS. 

H. A. Leed, fruit dealer and confec- 
tioner, Winnipeg, is dead. 

W H. Davis, of Rice & Davis, wholesale 
fruit merchants, Toronto, is dead. 



FIRES. 

John C. Price, general merchant, Dut- 
ton, Ont., is burnt out. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES 

S. Stroud, general merchant, Eden, Ont., 
has assigned to C. B. Armstrong. 

Wm. H. Leef, general merchant, Orillia, 
Ont., has assigned to John Ferguson. 

James Gerry, flour and feed merchant, 
Toronto, has assigned to Chas W. Laker. 

J. F. Copeland, grocer, Toronto, has as- 
signed to C. C. Bennett and W. W. Keigh- 
ley. 

S. C . Corin, fruit and provision mer- 
chant, Toronto, has assigned to Wm. B. 
Weil. 

J. L. Hopkins, wholesale and retail to- 
bacconist, Toronto, has assigned to H. 
Vigeon. 

Demand of assignment has been made 
upon Marchand & Co., flour merchants, 
Montreal. 

, Jacob Halliday, grocer and crockery 
merchant, Harriston, Ont., has assigned 
to A. G. Campbell. 

F. A. Campbell, grocer and dealer in 
boots and shoes, Shelburne, Ont., has as- 
signed to W. A. Campbell, Toronto. 



Tees, Wilson & Co., St. Peter street, Mon- 
treal, have ceased doing a general wholesale 
grocery business, and have sold their good 
will as such to the enterprising firm of Caver- 
hill, Rose, Hughes & Co., St. Peter and 
Commissioners streets, Montreal. The late 
customers of Tees & Wdson need have no 
fear of the manner of their treatment by Ca- 
verhill, Rose, Hughes & Co , but may feel sure 
that they wdl be dealing with one of the best 
houses in Canada. Tees, Wilson & Co. in 
the future confine their efforts to their tea, 
coffee and spice trade. 




INEYARDS C?/ lmnH 



Brantford 

and 

Pelee Islaud 



J. S. HAMILTON & CO'Y, 

Brantpobd, Ont 
Sole Agents for Canada. 



FRESH FISH 

: : Splendid 



Stock 



MANITOBA WHITEFISH, 
SALMON TROUT, 
CODFISH, HADDOCK, 
MACKEREL' SMELTS, 
FLOUNDERS, Etc. 

SSSu, D. W. PORT & CO., 

Filled. Wholesale Fish Agents, 

Esplanade, - - TORONTO. 



We would refer our readers to the adver- 
tisement in another column of Messrs. 
Jackson & Hallet, of Guelph, exporters of 
creamery butter, cheese, etc. It may inter- 
est them. 



You can lose more than we do 
by not subscribing for this paper. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



23 




SPECIAL BLEND 



PACKED BY 



INDIGENOUS IND1ANTEA PLANT 



THE KURMA TEA ESTATE, 

SYLHET, INDIA. 

y 2 lb. and i lb. Packages an 5 lb. Tins. 



DAVIDSON 8. RAY, 



36 YONGE ST. 




A NEW SOURCE OF 

REVENUE 

TO THE GROCERS 



Sole Agents for Canada, 

TORONTO. 

^HIGHLAND . . 
EVAPORATED 
72 CREAM 



t(nsU>eetene6 



Adii two parts of wattr to one of Evaporated Cream 
and it will answer perfectly for Dairy Cream. 
Dilute it with three parts of water, and you have an 
excellent quality of milk. Always pure and taintless. 



Prepared by . . 



FOR SALE BY ALL, WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Helvetia (VJilk (ondeNSinc (o., 



HlCHLAND, ill. 
U. S. A- 



WRIGHT & COPP. Ontario Agents. 

Toronto 



L. H. DOBBIN, Montreal, 

Quebec Agent. 



IT IS A GREAT SUCCESS. 

Grocers from all parts of the country report that it is a quick seller 

from the start. Order a case from your jobber at once. Every cus 

tomer you sell a bottle to will thank you after using it. Delicious 

Clam Broth can be made from it in one minute, with Hot water. 

Three sizes, retails at 25c, 50c, and 90c, in bottles only. Order from 

James Turner & Co., Hamilton, Ont., or write E. S. Burn- 
ham Company, " Manufacturers," 120 Gansevort St., New York, U.S.A. 
R. H. HOWARD & CO., Toronto. ROBT. MOORE, Travelling Agent, London, Ont. 

BATTY & GO'S PICKLES AND SAUCES 




^ 


P _-■■■■■: 

1 ' "• ,i'->> 




KF»bob 







Are the Finest Quality and Guaranteed Pure. 

A full line of these celebrated Goods are now kept 
in stock by 

Caverhill, Rose, Hughes & Co., 

Montreal. 
Sloan & Crowther, 

Toronto. 
James Turner & Co., 

Hamilton. 



123 and 125 FINSBURY PAVEMENT, LONDON. WRIGHT & COPP, Dominion Agents, TORONTO. 







KwB 


*~Jk^l 


P~J1 


?$&^w 


fiMFv . ' ■ 




»*ABo4P»BOfflWHB| 


^™^ 


warn 


*#»-^#: "M 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




Dominion Clothes Pin 

They are the Best. 
Send for Prices in Case Lots. 

C. C. BROWN, 

DANVILLE, QUE. 



THE FINEST 

IN THE LAND. 




EVERY CHOCOLATE IS STAMPED 

GS-. IB. 



GANONG BROS., Ltd. 

ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



CHA5. SOUTHWELL * CO., lo &d 

ENGLISH JAMS, JELLIES, PRESERVES, AND MARMALADES. 

specialty in CLEAR JELLT n/IRndLdDE5 



Scotch Home Made," 

Perfection." 

Lemon Jelly Marmalade," 

Lime Fruit flarmalade," 



Made from 
Seville Oranges, 
riessina Lemons, 
West India Limes. 



PUT UP IN GLASS JARS SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR EXPORT. 

Chas. Southwell & Co. are also manufacturers of Candied Peels, Excelsior 

Packet Concentrated Jellies, etc., etc. All goods having 

their brand are exceptionally choice quality. 

FULL PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. WORKS : D0CKHEA&, LONDON, ENCLAND. 



GROCERS ! 



Samples of our new lines of Brooms are 
now in our travellers hands. 

It will pay you to handle them, and we 
particularly call your attention to our brands. 



Extra Fine. 



Fine. 



Select. 



Imperial, 
Victoria, 
Standard, 
Leader, Ti pp ed 

We also manufacture all kinds of Special 
Brooms for Floor, Yard, Stable, Warehouse, 
and Factory use. 

CURLING BROOMS ON BAMBOO 
HANDLES OUR SPECIALTY. 

Our best grades have seperate Paper 
Cover on each Broom. 

SEND FOR NEW PRICE LIST. 

CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers, TORONTO. 



SITUATION WANTED. 
MARATIME PROVINCES. 



WANTED— A SITUATION AS TRA- 
veller for Provisions or Groceries, 
also side lines. Apply care 
1593 B., this office. 

COWAN'S 
OCOAS «« 
HOCOLATES 

Are Standard, and sold by 
all grocers. 

Dyc"crisrisr 3 s 

Famous 
Boneless Codfish 

NEW and GENUINE. 

NOW ARRIVING. 
Packed in assorted Boxes, 5-lbs., 10-lbs., 
20-lbs , and 40-lbs., containing 1 and 2 lb. 
Bricks, also 

lULTJisrisrs 
Skinless Codfish 

Packed in 100 lb. Boxes, Whole Fish. 

Delightful thick Codfish Steak. 

Orders can be filled at short notice after this. 

Stewart, Mtmn & Co., 
MONTREAL. 




Crosse & 
Blackwell 




* 



CELEBRATED FOR 

Jams, 

Piokles, 

Sauces, 

:F»ott«3ci Meats, 

Table DelieacieS( 

SOLD BY 



All Grocers in Canada 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 




RETAIL GROCERS 



WILL FIND IT 



To their Interest 



TO BUY 



B 




R 



STARCHES 

The Purest and Best 
in the Market. 



BRITISH AMERICA 
STARCH CO., 

LIMITED, 

Brantford, Ontario 




It JieveF 
Varies . . 




Sold only in Cans by the Live 

Wholesale and Retail 

Trade 



and Manufac'ured by 




The Hamilton $pke 

AND (OFFEE (o . . . 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



THE CANADA MEAT PACKING CO., 



IMZOZlSTTZRIEL^IU 

BEEF AND PORK PACKERS, 



Carers of the Celebrated C.M.P Brand of Smoked Meat, Sugar cured 
extra-flavored Hams and Bacon, 



Ccr.,pressed Corned Beef. Ox and Lunch Tongue. 

Pure Lard a Specialty. 



WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



Condensed fllinee JVIeat 



Delicious Mince Pies 

every day in the 

year. 

Handled by retailer 
as shelf or counter 
g o d s . No waste. 
Gives general satis- 
faction. 

Sells at all seasons. 

Will not ferment in 
warm weather. 



^se&- 



ALI *n.ESUr«» CHU ST rNEN 



The best and cheapest 
Mince Meat on 
Earth. Price re- 
duced to $12.00 
per gross, net. 



J. H. WETHEY, St. Catharines, Ont. 




Portable Coffee Roasters, 

FOR RETAIL GROCERY TRADE, 

— ALSO — 

STATIONARY COFFEE ROASTERS 

and Coffee and Spice machinery for whole 
sale trade. 

Send for new Illustrated Catalogue. 

HE HUNCERFORD (0., 

67 Pearl Street, New York. 



X 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A GREAT HIT! 

Adams' Tutti Frutti Automatic 
Girl Sign Box. Works by clock 
work. A big attraction for your 
window. Send for circular. 

ADAMS' & SONS CO., 

S>] ""'""-^ * | , j and j 3 jarvis St., 

fcr EXTERIOR VIEW. TORONTO, ONT. INTERIOR VIEW. ^ 








THE KING OFBbACKINGS 




F. F. DALLEY & CO. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



IE. ZBIRCTWIN" & sonsrs 

7 Garrick Street, London, England, and at 26 Rue Bergere, Paris 

BOOT PREPARATIONS 

SOLD EVERYWHERE. 





Meltonian 
Cream 

Patent Leather 

Made ty 

E.BROWN&SON 

AT Ttitm 

MANUFACTORY 
GARRICK ST LoHOONi 




BLACKING 

(As used in the Royal 
Household) 

Renders the Boots soft, dur- 
able and waterproof. 



MELTONIAN 
CREAM 

(white or black) 

For Renovating all 

kinds of Glace Kid 

Boots and Shoes. 



H ROYAL 1 

IjUTETFANCpj 

BROWN LEATHER BOCftt 
M% SHOES HARNES5.- 

E;.Brown&So'n 



?CarrickS*LondonW( 



ROYAL 

LUTETIAN 

CREAM 

The best for Cleaning 
and Polishing Rus- 
sian and Brown Lea- 
ther Boots, Tennis 
Shoes, etc. 




NONPAREIL 

DE GUICHE 

Parisian Polish 

For Varnishing Dress Boots 
and Shoes is more elastic and 
easier to use than any other 



Cough Drops 

Unequalled for coughs and sore 
throat. 

Packed in elegant 5 lb. Tins or Bottles. 
Prices on application. 



Messrs. Salomon* Phillips, 33 Spruce St., New York, sole Agents for c.n.d. «„ d u.s.a. 



Win. Paterson & Son 

BRANTFORD. 

[HE "MOST POPULAR" BUCK LEAD. 
THE " MOST REMARKABLE " POLISH. 



PLEASE ASK FOB AlfD USE ONLY 

NIXEY'S SPECIALITIES OF STERLING VALUE 



3 



x> la ch tna.viAi 
Jbead 




Hundreds uf Testimonials from all parts, including 

Her Majesty's, Royal Buckingham Palace. 
HIGHEST EXHIBITION HONOURS. 



FOR BRIGHT. SILVERY, QUICK POLISH 
m STOVES .4 BRATES, ^ 




ALWAYS USE 



*&r 



t^ PLUMBAGO" 

STOVE POLISH. 



. V T5 Always Bright & Beautiful. 

In Large Packets Id. & 2d. each. 



L'm only for Laundrj Furpo«», producing the be«t result*. 




NIXEY'S 
BLUE 



"S0HO 
SQUARE 



THE PUREST— BEST— NO SEDIMENT. 



OWLT HALT TBI T.PAL QPAWTITT 
KBQl'IBKD. 



Eight 1-oz. iquares In Box for 6d. 
Of all Giocers and Oilmen ; or write to 
IS, SOHO SQUARE. LONDON, ENGLAND. 



For Knives, Forks, Brass 

and Steel Work, &c, &c. 
Won't Wear the Blades like 
others. - 

6d. and la. Tins. 

NIXEY'S 

KNIFE POLISH. 

OF ALL STOREKEEPERS EVERYWHERE. 
Wholesale: W. G. N1XEY, London, England. 




"INVICTA" 



Canadian representatives : 

Mr. W. Matthews, 7 Richmond St 

East, Toronto. 
Mp. Charles Gyde, 33 St. Nicholas 

St., Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



ENGLISH BISCUITS 



All Grocers should keep a supply of genuine ENGLISH BISCUITS 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 



HUNTLEY & PALflERS 



BISCUIT 

MANUFACTURERS 




TO HER MAJESTY 

THE QUEEN, ETC. 



READING AND LONDON, ENGLAND, 

For which there is an ever increasing demand. 

HUNTLEY & PALMERS have obtained the highest awards given to any English House for Biscuits at all the leading Exhibitions 
since 1851, and at the Paris Exhibition in 1878 they were awarded the " Grand Prix." the only Grand Prize given to the Biscuit Trade 
and the highest distinction the Exhibition could confer. The following being the terms of the award : 

" Unrivalled House known throughout the world for its enormous production and for the excellent quality of its Manufactures. 
FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS APPLY TO 



Or to their representative, 

MR. EDWARD VALPY, 

28 Reade Street, 

NEW YORK. 



HUNTLEY & PALMERS, 

READING- 

and 162 Fenchurch Street, 

LONDON, E. C., ENGLAND. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER PRICES CURRENT. 



Tobonto, Jan. 19, 1893. 

This list is corrected every Thurs- 
day. The prices are solicited for pub- 
lication, an i are for such qualities 
and quantities as are usually ordered 
by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt 
piy aregeneralij obtainable at lower 
prices. 

All quotations in this department 
are under the direct control of the 
Editor, and are not paid for or doc- 
tored I y any manufacturing or lob- 
bing hou*e unless givt-n under their 
name ; the right being reserved to 
exclude such farms as uo not furnish 
reliable information. 

BAKING POWDER, 

Pt'BE oold. per doz 
j5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

j I lb. cans 1 doz. 

in case 16 00 

\-iV, lb. cans, 1 and 

2 doz in case 10 50 

J 16 oz- cans 1. 2 and 

4 doz. incase.... 4 60 
|l2 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

I doz. in case 3 70 

™8 oz. cans 2 and 4 

doz. in case 2 40 

6 oz. cars, 2 and 4 

doz in case 1 90 

4 oz. cans, 4 and 6 doz in case ... 1 25 
Per doz 

Dunn's No. 1, in tins 2 00 

" 2 " 75 

Cook's Gem, in 1 lb pkgs $\ 75 

" " 7 oz pkgs 85 

" " 2oz " 40 

" " 51b tins 65 

' " bulk, per lb.... 12 

Per doz 

Empire, 5 dozen 4 oz cans $0 75 

6 4 8 " 1 15 

" 2 16 " 2 00 

" V4 5 lb cans 9 00 

" bulk, per lb 15 




COOK'S FBIBND. 

(in Paper Packages.) Per doz 
Size 1, in 2and4doz boxes... $2 40 

11 10, in 4 doz boxes 2 10 

" 2,in6 " 80 

" 12,in6 " 7C 

" 3,iu4 " 45 

Pound tins, 3 oz in case 3 oc 

12 oz tins,3oz in case 2 40 

5 oz tins, 4 " 1 10 

5 lb tins, H " 14 00 

Ocean Wave, M lb, 4 doz cases 75 

OCEAN &!*.*. •• : iSS 

1 lb, 2 " .2 2C 

51b, Vt " . 9 60 

white Stab. per doz 

toz tins, 3 doz in case 75 

12 " 2 doz in case 2 00 

- ">lb " $ " 9 00 

P M 1 H3KB - ">oz glass jars, 2J doz 

in case 1 10 

10 oz glass jars, 2 doz 

in case 

Bulk, per lb 



WAVE 




p?PRICE$ 
CREAM 



doz. in 
case 
Dime cans, 4 

4 oz " 

6 " " 

8 " " 

2 " " 

16 " 

2$lbs " 

4 i« i' 




BISCUITS. 

TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFEO- 
TIONEBY CO. 

Abernethy 8J 

Arrowroot $0 11 

Butter o 6 

3 lbs 20 

Cabin 7$ 

Cottage 8J 



Digestive 10 

Daisy Wafer 16 

Garibaldi 10 

Gingerbread 11 

Ginger Nuts 10 

Graham Wafer 09 

Lemon 10 

Milk 09 

Nic Nac 12 

Oyster 06 

People's Mixed 10$ 

Pic Nic o 09 

Prairie 08$ 

Rich Mixed 14 

School Cake 11 

Soda 06 

" 3 1b 20 

Sultana 11 

Tea 11 

Tid Bits 09$ 

Variety Oil 

Village 07$ 

Wine 08$ 

BLACKING. 

Day & Martin's, pints, per doz $3 20 

" H " 2 10 

" M " 1 10 

Spanish, No.3 4 50 

" " 5 8 00 

" " 10 9 00 

Japanese, No. 3 4 00 

" " 5 7 50 

Jaquot's French No. 2 3 00 

" " 3 4 50 

" " " 4 8 00 

•' 5 10 00 

" 1-gross Cabinets, asst, 7 50 

Egyptian, No. 1 9 CO 

" " 2 4 50 

P. G. PBBNOH DRESSING (LADIES.) 

For ladies' and children's boots and 
shoes. 

per doz 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box $i 00 

No. 4, " " 1 25 

P. G. FRENCH BLACKING. 

per gross 

MNo. 4 $1 00 

H No. 6 4 50 

&N0.8 7 25 

MNo. 10 26 



BLACK LEAD. 

G d 

"S 

NIXEY'S "g g 

o <S 

Refined iu Id., 2d , 4d. and i-5 ° 
Is. packages, (91b. boxes) 7s 6d $2 5 

Jubilee in loz. and 2 oz. 
round blocks in cartons 
(9 1b. boxes) 4s 3d 2 00 

Silver Moonlight, Plum- 
bago Stove Polish (13$ 
lb. boxes). 

6$ lb. in large $d. pkts, 1 
Kfoss 4s 3d 1 50 

13 lb. in large $d. pkts, 2 

„g r ° ss ", 8s 6d 3 00 

13 lb. in large Id. pkts, 1 

gi -08S 7s 6d 2 50 

13 lb. in large 2d. pkts, $ 

gross 7s 6d 2 50 

R«ci».itt's Black Lead, per box. 116 
Each box contains either 1 gro., 1 
oz.: $ gro , 2 oz , or J gro., 4 oz. 

F.F.DALLEY & CO. 
_,., Per gross 

Silver Star Stove Paste 9 00 

Packed in fancy wood boxes, each 
box contains 3 doz. 
BLUE. 
Reokitt's Pure Blue, per gross 2 1C 

NIXEY'S 

Soho Square in 8 lb. boxes, of 
16x6d boxes, London 6s Od 

Soho Square in 8 lb. boxes, of 
16x6d. boxes, Canada 82 25 

CORN BROOMS. 

chas. boeckh & sons, per doz 
X Carpet, 4 strings, net $3 eo 

2 " 4 " " 3 20 

3 " 3 " 2 

XXXHurH " '' 2 90 

IX " 4 " " 2 65 

2X Parlor 4 " '* 250 

3 " 3 " 2 25 

4 " 3 " " 1 85 

5 " 2 " " 1 50 

Warohouse4 " " 3 25 

Ship 4 " " 4 00 

1 Cable 2 wire bands, net 3 25 

2 '.' 3 " " ... 4 00 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




FOR COOKING 




ST. LAWRENCE 



CORN STARCH, 








Price* Current Continued— 



• CANNED GOODS. 

Per doz 

Arples.S's «0 85 $1 00 

gallons 2 00 

Blackbeiries.2 8 00 2 26 

Blueberries, 2 100 110 

Beans, 2 90 1 00 

Corn,2's 085 1 09 

11 Special Brands 130 160 

Cherries, red pitted, 2's 2 10 

Peas, 2's 85 1 00 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 175 

" Sugar 2's 1 50 

Pineapple 2's 2 75 

Peaches, 2's 2 00 2 25 

» 3's 3 00 3 25 

" Pie,3'8 

Plums. Gr Gages, 2's 1 75 2 00 

" Lombard 1 75 1 65 

" Diuuson Blue 1 50 1 90 

Pumpkins, 3's 85 1 00 

" gallons 3 00 3 25 

Raspberries, 2's 2 00 2 40 

Strawberries, choice 2's . 8 00 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 165 

Tomatoes, 3'i 86 1 00 

"Thistle" Finnan baddies 1 50 

Lobster. Clover Leaf 2 40 2 00 

" Crown flat 2 40 2 50 

" tall 1 90 2 00 

Other brands J 80 2 10 

Mackerel 100 110 

Salmon, tails 145 160 

" Bats 170 

Sardines Albert, %'a tins 12H 

>> " H's " 20 

Martiny, X'a " . 10 10% 
" %'s " . 16 17 

" Other brands, 93£ 11 16 17 

" P&C, %'a tins 23 25 

ii »i y,'a » 33 36 

Sardines Amer, H's " 6J 8 

" " %'a " 9 11 



CANNED MEATS. 



(CANADIAN) 

Comp. Corn Beef lib cans $1 60 
,. » 2 " 2 65 

. ' 4 " 4 80 

.. " 6 " 8 00 

u K 14 " 17 50 

MincedCollops, 2 lbcans 

Boast Beef 1 " ■ • ■•• 

n 2 " 2 60 

ii .....A ' 

Par Ox Tongue, 2V4 " «8 00 

Ox Tcugue 2 7 85 

Lur et Tongue.. 1 » -^ 

English Brawn. 2 " 2 75 
Camb. Sausage. 1 " 

ii •' .2 " 

Soups, assorted. 1 " — 

ii ii .2 " •••• 

Soups & Boulli.'. 2 " 

| >' .6 " 

Potted Chicken, Turkey, or 

Game, 6 ozcans 

Potted Ham, Tongue or Bt^f, 6 
oz cans 



*1 76 
2 80 

5 00 
8 25 

18 50 
2 60 

1 50 

2 75 
4 75 
8 25 
8 00 

3 25 

6 25 
2 80 
2 50 

4 00 

1 35 

2 25 
1 80 
4 50 

1 60 

1 35 



Devilled Tongue or Ham, hi lb 

cans 1 40 

Devilled Chicken or Turkey, 

K lb cans 2 25 

Sandwich Ham our Tongue, V% 

lb cans 1 50 

Ham, Chicken and Tongue, 4 

lbcans 1 75 



CHEWING GUM. 

ADAMS & SONS CO. 

ToRetatlert 

Tutti Prutti, 36 5c bars 81 20 

Pepsin TultiFrutti, 235c. packets 75 

Orange Blossom 150 pieces 1 00 

(each box contains a bottle of high 
class perfume. Guaranteed first 
olftss ) 
Monte Cristo, 180pieoes... 130 

(with brilliant stoue ring) 
Sappota, 150 pieces... 100 

Sweet Pern, 230 " ... 76 

Red Rose, 115 pieces ... 75 

Magic Trick, 115 " ... 76 

Oolah 115 " ... 75 

Puzzle Gum 115 pieces .... 75 

Bo-Kay 150 " ... 1 00 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c. bars 1 20 

Flirtation Gum (115 pieces) 65 

Automatic ) 

Tutti Prutti Girl.... £800 pieces. 6 00 
Sign Box (new) ) 

C. R. 80MEBV1LLE. 

Mexican P'uit, 36— 5c. Bars .. 120 

Pepsin (Dyspepsia), 20— 5c. Bars 70 

Sweet Sugar Cane, 150 pieces 1 00 

Celery, 100 " 70 

Lalla' Rookh (all flavors) 100 " 70 

Jingle Bell, 1j0 " 1 00 

Cracker, 114 " 1 00 

O-Dont-O, 144 ' 1 00 

Little Jap, 100 " 70 

Dude Prize; 144 " 1 00 

Clock Gum compnsiijg,5u0 pieces 
Gum (assorted flavors), and I 
'Little Lord Fauntleyroy" clock 

guaranteed.) 3 75 

La Rosa (20-10c. pieces) 1 40 

Baby (100-lc. pieces) 65 

Alphabet (100-lc. pieces) 6i 

Keuo Prize (144-lc. pieces) 1 00 

Love Talk (100-lc. pieces) 70 

CHOCOLATES <fe COCOAS. 

TODHUNTEB, MITCHELL & CO.S 

Chocolate— Per lb 

French, %'a.... 6 and 12 lbs. 30 
Caraccas. M's..6 and 12 lbs. 35 
Premium, J's. .6 and 12 lbs. 30 

Sante, !4's, 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond, v 4 's, 6 and 12 lbs. 22 
Sticks, gross boxes, each.. 00 
Cocoa, Homcepat'c,H's, 8 & 14 lbs 30 
11 Pearl " 4i " 25 
" London Pearl 12 & 18 " 22 
» Rock " " 30 
" Bulk.inbxs 18 

EPP'd. 

Coeoa— per lb 

Case of 112 lbs each 35 

Smaller quantities 374 



BENBDOBP'S BOTAL DUTCH COCOA. 

>4 lb. cans, per doz $2 40 

V4 4 50 

1 " " " 8 5C 

FBY'S 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents) 

Chocolate— per lb 

Carracas, i's, 6 lb. boxes 40 

Vanilla. i's. " 40 

"Gold Medal" Sweet, 6 lb bxs. 30 

Pure, unsweetened. J's, fi lo bxs. 40 

' Frv's " Diamond fs, 6 lb bxs. 26 

"Fry's " Monogram, J, 6 lb bxs. 26 

Cocoa— per doz 

Concentrated, i's, 1 doz in box... 2 40 

j's, " . 4 50 

1 lbs. " ... 8 75 

Homospathic, i's, 14 lb boxes 34 

Jibs, 12 lb boxes... 34 



JOHN P. MOTT * CO.'S 

R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott's Broma per lb $0 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homoeopat'c Cocoa (is) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa 35 

Mott's Breakf. Cocoalin tins) 40 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate.. 28 
Mott's Caracas Chocolate — 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate... 82 
Mott's French-Can Chocolate 20 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Choc 26 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 30 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 5 

Mott's VanillaOhocolate stick V2&24 

Mott's Confec Chocolate 22c- 40 

Mott's Sweet Choc. Liquors 21c— 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Cocoas — 

Hygienic, 1, J, i lb. boxes 70 75 

Iceland Moss Hlbin 12lbbxes... 35 

Soluble (bulk) 15 & 30 lb bxs .... 18 20 

Soluble (tins) 6 lb and 12 lb.... 20 

Cocoa Nibs, any quantity 30 35 

Cocoa Shells, any quantity 05 

Cocca Essence per doz 1 10 

Chocolates- 
Mexican, ii, Win 10 lb bxs 30 
Queen s Dessert, 40 
Vanilia " 35 
Sweet Caracas '• 32 
Chocolate Powder, 15, 30 lb bxs 25 
Chocolate Sticks, per gross.. 00 
Pure Caracas (plain) %, % lbs 40 
Royal Navy (sweet) " 30 
Confectioners' in 10 lb cakes SO 
Chocolate Creams, in 3 lb bxs 30 
Chocolate Parisien, in 6 lb bxn 30 

WALTEB, BAKER Si CO'S 

Chocolate — 
Pre'umNo. 1, bxs 12 & 25 lbs each 45 
Baker's Vanilla in bxs 12 lbs each 55 
Caraccas Sweet bxs 6 lbs each, 12 

oxs in case 40 

Best Sweet in bxs, 6 lbs. each, 13 

boxes in case 30 

Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 bxs 

in case, per box 4 00 



German Sweet Chocolate — 

Grocers' Style, in cases 12 boxes, 

12 lbs each S8 

Grocers' Style, in cases 24 boxes, 6 

lbs each 80 

48 Fingers to the lb., in cases 12 bxs 

12 lbs each 30 

48F ; ngers to the lb., in oases 24 bxs 

6 lbs each 30 

8 Cakes to the lb., in cases, 21 bxs 

61bs. each 32 

Soluble Chocolate- 
In canisters, I lb., 4lb., and 10 lb. 56 

Cocoa — 
Pure Prepared, bxes, 12 lbs each 42 
Cracked, in bxs. 12 lbs., each, J lb. 

papers 36 

Cracked, in bags, 6, 10 and 25 lbs. 

each 30 

Breakfast Cocoa — 
Id bxs S& 12 lbs., each, i lb., tins 48 
In boxes, 12 lbs., each, lib tins, 

decorated canisters 50 

Cocoa Shells, 1'2's and 25's 10 

Broma— 
In boxes. 12 lbs., eaoh, i lb. tins... 46 



" Highland Brand 
Evaporated 
Cream, per 
case 7 26 




4 doz. 1 lb tinp. 



CLOTHES PINS. 

5 gross, per box 76 

4 gross, " 85 

6 gross, " 1 20 

chas. bceckh & sons, per box 

5 gross, single &10boxlot6 75 80 

Star, 4 doz. in package 85 

" 6 " " 1 25 

" 4 ' cotton bags 90 

COPFKK. 

gbeen c per lb 

Mocha 28, 33 

Old Government Java 25,35 

Rio 20 22 

Plantation Ceylon 29, 31 

Porto Rico 24,28 

Guatemala 24, 26 

Jamaica 22, 23 

Maracaibo 24, 2f 

TODHDNTEB, MITCHELL & CO. '8 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey ■' 30 

Laguayra " 28 

Mocha andJava 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 30 

Santos 27 28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 



JAM 



We have an immense stock of pure 
Jams and Jellies, put up in Glass Jars 
and 5 lb. and 1 lb. Tins, and in 1 4 lb. and 
28 lb. pails. These goods are as fine 



and pure as the best imported. A trial will convince, 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFECTIONERY CO. 



Tel. 528. 



7 Front St. East, Toronto, 



Priett cr'tnt, continued — 

J. W. 00 WAN & CO. 

Standard Java in sealed tins, 

26and60lbs SO 

Standard Imperial in sealed 

tins, 25 and 50 lbs 32 

Standard Blend in sealed tins, 

25and60 1bs 83 

(Ground, In tins, 6, 10, 15 and 

25 lbs 80 30 

Say's Parisien, in H and lb tins 30 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 



Alum lb 

Blue Vitriol 

Brimstone 

Borax 

Camphor 

Carbolic Acid 

Castor Oil 

Cream Tartar 

Epsom Suits 

Paris Green 

Extract Logwood, balk 
" " boxes 

Gentian 

Glycerine, per lb 

Hellebore 

Iodine 

Insect Powder 

Balpetre 

Soda Bicarb, per keg 

Sal Soda 

Madder 



$0 02 


$0 03 


06 


07 


03 


03$ 


12 


14 


65 


76 


30 


50 


07$ 


08 


28 


30 


01$ 


02 


16 


17 


13 


14 


15 


17 


10 


18 


17 


20 


16 


17 


5 50 


6 00 


30 


36 


08$ 


09 


2 50 


2 76 


1 00 


1 25 


124 





DURABLE PAILS AND TUBS 

WM. CANE & BONd, MANUFACTURING CO 

NEWMARKET. 

Per doz. 
Steel hoops, painted and erain'd 2 20 
Brass hoops, oiled and varnish. 3 25 

No 1 tubs 9 50 

No2 » 8 50 

No 3 " 1 M 



Currants, Patras, bbls 

•• " $ bbls 

" " cases 

" Vostizzas, cases... 

" " $ cases 

" 5-crown Excelsior 

(cases) 

" $case 

Dates, Persian, boxes 

Figs, Elemes, 14oz., per box 

" 10 lb boxes 

" 301b bxa. 7 crown 

Prunes, Bosnia, casks 

it " case*, new. 

Raisins, Valencia, ofl stalk 

old 

Selected 

Layers 

Raisins, Sultanas 

" Eleme 

' Malaga : 

London layers 2 

Loose muscatels 

Imperial cabinets 

Connoisseur clusters ... 4 

Extra dessert ■• 

'• " ' qrs. . 

Royal clusters 

Fancy Vega boxes 

Black baskets 3 

•' •' qrs 

Blue " 

Find Dehesas 

" " qrs 

Lemons 8 

Oranges, Jamaica 2 

'• Valenoias 

" Floridas 3 

" Seedlings 

" Navels 





6 


7 


7 


7} 


9 


8'/, 


10 


8 


1! 


81 


S 


6$ 


11 


m 


11 


i* 


15 


16 



Oats, No 2, per 34 lbs ... 31 32 

Barley, No 1 per 48 lbs.. 49 50 

" No 2 extra 43 46 

" No3 " 38 89 

Rye 69 60 

Peas 68 60 

Corn 56 57 



HAY & STRAW. 

Hay, Pressed, "on traok .... 9 00 
Straw Pressed," .... 6 00 6 50 



HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 



00 4 50 
... 4 50 



60 S 80 



DOMESTIC 

Apples, Dried, per lb. 
do Evaporated... 



EXTRACTS. 

Dalley'e Fine Gold, No. 8, p. doz . $0 75 

• 1,1$ oz... 1 25 

• • " '• " 2,2 oz 1 75 

•• " " 3. 3oz.... 2 00 

(SEELY'fl FLAVORING) per doz 

Concentrated, 2 oz. full measure 175 

» 4oz. " " 3 00 

In Lemon, Vanilla and Assorted 

Flavors. Less 10 per cent, discount 

a gioss quantities or more. 

FLUID BEEF. 

JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL 

per doz 



FISH. 

Oysters, per gallon 

" select, per gallon 

Pickerel per lb 

Pike do 

White fish do 

Manitoba White fish do 

Salmon Trout do 

Lake herring p. 100 

Pickled and Salt Fish : 
Labrador herring, p.bbl 

Shore herring " 

Salmon trout, per $ bbl 
White Fish, $ bbl 

Dried Fish : 

Codfish, per quintal 

" cases 

Boneless fish per lb 

Boneless cod " 

Smoked Fish : 
Finnan Haddies. per lb 

Bloaters per box 

Digby herring " 



6 00 



5 00 
5 50 



5 25 

6 00 



51 

8 4} 

7 7$ 
7$ H 
6$ 10 

Cot Nails, from Toronto 

25 2 50 60 to 60 dv basis 2 30 

40 dy 2 35 

30 dy 2 40 

20, 16 and 12 d> 2 t*> 

lOdy 2 50 

8and9dy 2 65 

6 and 7 dy 2 70 

5dy 2 90 

4dy AP 290 

3dy A P 3 30 

4dyCP 2 «0 

SdyCP SW 

Horse Nails: 

"0" 60 and 5 per cent, from list. 
Hor?e Shoes: 

From Toronto, per keg 3 65 

Screws: Wood — 
Flat head iron 77$ p.o. dis 
Round " " 72* p.o. dis. 
Flat head brass 75 p.c. dis 
Round head brass 70 p c. 

Window Glass : [To find out what 
break any required size of pane comes 
under, aad its length and breadth to- 
gether. Thus in a 7x9 pane the 
length and breadth come to 16 
inches; which shows it to be a first - 
break glass, i.e., not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in and under) 136 

2nd " (26 to 40 inches) 155 

3rd " (41 to 50 " ) 3 40 

4th " (51 to 60 " ) 3 70 

6th " (61 to 70 " 4 00 

Rope : Manilla ......... 

Sisal 

New Zealand 



no 3 50 

75 3 00 

.. 4 60 

00 3 50 



04} 051 
07$ 08 



f 60 2 



1 25 

6' 06 
07 
07 
7$ 
07 
50 



6 25 
5 00 
5 50 
5 75 



5 75 

6 50 
04$ 
08 



07$ 08$ 

1 00 2 25 
20 



Oasoa, No. 1,2 oztins .... *2 75 $3 00 Sea Fish : Haddockperlb 

'• No. 2, 4 oztins.... 4 50 5 00 Cod " 

" No. 3,8 oz tins.... 8 00 8 75 B.C. salmon " 

" No. 4, 1 lb tins.... 12 60 14 25 Market Cod " 



05 



Off 
07 
13 



No.6,'i lb tins.... 26 00 27 Ot Frozen Sea Herrings 1 76 2 o" 



FRUITS. 

FOREIGN . 

o. per It 

Currants, Provincial, bbls. ... 6} 

" " $ bbls ... 6 

" Filiatras. bbls 6$ 

" " ibbls ... « 6$ 



GRAIN. 



llf 

09} 

.... 08} 

Axes : Per box, $6 to $12. 

Shot : Canadian, dis. 12$ per cent. 

Hinges: Heavy T and strap ...04} 05 
" Screw, hook & strap. 03} 042 

White Lead: Pure Ass'n guarantee 
ground in oil. 

251b. irons per lb 4 4V4 

No.l " ••• 5 

No.2 " 4K 

No. 3 " .. 4 

Turpentine Selected packages, per 
gal ... 50 

Linseed Oil per gal, raw 56$ 57$ 
Boiled, per gal 69$ eo$ 

Glue: Common, per lb 10 11 



Wheat, Fall,No2 66 67 INDURATED FIBRE WARE. 

" Red Winter, No 2 65 66 

Wheat, Spring, No 2 64 65 $ pail, 6 qt U 00 

" in Hard, Wo 1.. 91 92 Star Standard, 12 qt 4 50 

No 2.. 84 85 Milk,14qt 6 50 

No. 3... 77 77$ Round bottomed fire pail, 14 qt. 6 60 



Mai 



Tubs, No. 1 15 so 

" » 13 25 

„ " 8 11 00 

Nests of 3 8 40 

Eeelers No. 1 ; io 00 

2 9 00 

3 8 00 

.„ * 7 00 

Milk pans 3 25 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 3 25 

" round " 3 60 

Handy dish 3 75 

Water Closet Tanks 18 00 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

DELHI CANNING CO 

Jams assorted, extra fine, l's . 2 36 
Jellies, extra fine l's 2 26 

TORONTO BISCUIT & CONFECTIONERY CO 

Per lb 
Jams, absolutely pure— apple... $0 06 

Family 07 

Black and Red currant. Rasp- 
berry, Strawberry, Peach 

and Gooseberry per lb 12 

Plum 10 

Jellies— pure— all kinds 10 

These goods are put up in 
glass j»trs and in 5, and 10 
lb. tins and 28 lb. pails. 
Marmalade— orange 12 

KNIFE POLISH, 

NIXEY'S 

" Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

6d London 5s., Canada, $2 00 

"Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

Is London 10s„ Canada, $1 00 

LICORICE. 

young & smylie's list. 

5 lb boxes, wood or paper, per lb 40 
Fancy bxs. (36 or 50 sticks), per 

box 1 25 1 25 

'■ Ringed" 5 lb boxes, per lb 40 

" Acme" Pellets, 51b cans, per 

can 2 00 

'Acme" Pellets, Fancy boxes 

(30s) per box 150 

" Acme " Pellets, Fancy paper 

boxes, per box (40s) 1 25 

Tar Licorice and ToluWafers, 5 

lb cans per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb glass 

jars 1 76 

Licorice Lozenges 5 lb cans... 1 50 
Purity" Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 
100 " . 72$ 
Imitation Calabria, 5 lb bxs 

plb 25 

MINCE MEAT. 

3. H. WETHEY'S — ST.CATHARINES 

Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

ELLIS & KEIGHLEY'S. CtS 

Durham, Fine, in land $ lb tins 

per lb 25 

" Fine, in 1 lb Jars 22 

" Fine, in 41b jars 70 

Ex Sup,, in bulk, per lb 30 

' Superior in bulk, p. lb 20 

Fine, " " 16 

Cherry's Irish 

Pure in 1 lb. tins 40 

Pure in 1 lb. tins 42 

Pure in { lb. tin* 044 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Price* current, continued. 

NUTS. per lb 

Almonds, Ivioa 13 14 

" Tarragona 154 16 

•' Fomigetta 1? 14 

Almonds, Shelled Valencias 28 32 

Jordan. 40 45 

" '• Canary ... 28 30 

Brazil " 1*J 

Cocoannts 5 6 

Filberts, Sicily 9i 10 

Pecans 11 15 

Peanuts, roasted 10 12 

" green 9 1° 

Walnuts, Grenoble 15 16 

" Bordeaux 10 11 

" Naples, cases 

" Marbots 12* 13 

•< Chilis 12 13 

PETROLEUM. 

to 10 bbl lots, Toronto... Imp.gai 

Canadian 14 *0 15 

Caroon Safety 17 18 

Canadian Water White 20 22 

Amer'n Prime White 23 

" Water White.. 24 25 

Photogene 27 00 

(For prices at Petrolia, see Market 
Report.) 

PICKLES & SAUCES. 

THE T. A. SNIDER PRESERVE CO., 
CINCINNATI. 

Wright & Copp, Toronto, Agents,) 
per doz 

ome Made Tomato Catsup, qts 6 00 
" •' pts 3 50 

" " 54 pts 2 00 

hili Sauce pts 4 50 

V, pts 3 25 

Soups (in 3 lb cans). 

Tomato 3 50 

Fancy— Chicken, Mock Turtle. 
Cream of Corn Pea, Celery, 

Asparagus 4 50 

Fancy — Chicken Gumbo, Oy 
Tail, Consomme Bouillon, 
Mulligatawny, Mutton Broth, 
Beef, Pea, Printanir, Julienne 
Vermicelli, Vegetable 4 25 



lea & perrin's. per doz 
Worcester Sauce, J pts.. $3 60 S3 76 
" " pints 6 25 6 50 

lazenby & sons Per doz 

Pickles, all kinds, pints 3 25 

" " quarts 6 00 

Harvey Sauce-genuine— hlf. pts 3 25 
Mushroom Catsup " 2 25 

Anchovy Sauce " " 3 25 

PRODUCE. 

dairy. Per b 

Butter, oreamery, tubs. 80 21 $0 23 

" dairy, tubs, choice 16 20 

" " medium 14 16 

" low grades to com 12 13 

Butter, pound rolls .... 19 20 

large rolls 8 20 

" store crocks.... 8 20 
Cheese llj 

COUNTRY 

Eggs, fresh, per doz 25 

" limed. 17 

Beans 1 15 1 35 

Onions, per bbl 175 2 25 

Potatoes, per bag 60 70 

Hops, 1891 crop 13 15 

" 1892 " 16 18J 

Honey, extracted 05 07 

" section 12 14 



PROVISIONS. 

Bacon, long clear, p lb. 10J 11 

Pork, mess, p. bbl 

" shortcut 17 50 18 00 

Hams, smoked, per lb 13 

pickled 12 

Bellies 13 

Rolls 10$ 

Backs 12$ 13 

Lard, Canadian, per lb 12 iaj 

Compound 10 

Tallow, refined, per lb.. 05 05$ 

" rough, " 02 



RICE, ETC. 



Per lb 



Bice, Aracan 33 4 

" Patna 4| 51 

" Japan 5 6$ 

" extra Burmah 3J 4 

" Java extra 6$ 7 

" Genuine Old Carolina .... 9$ 10 



Grand Duke 6} 71 

Sago i% 5$ 

Tapioca 5 5$ 

ROOT BEER. 

Hire's (Liquid) per doz $2 00 

SPICES. 

ground Per lb. 

PeVper, black, pure $0 12JS0 15 

" fine to superior 10 15 

white, pure 20 28 

" fine to choice 20 25 

Ginger, Jamaica, pure 25 27 

" African, " 16 18 

Cassia, fine to pure 18 25 

Cloves, " " 14 25 

Allspice, choice to pure.... 12 15 

Cayenne, " " 30 35 

Nutmegs, " " 75 1 20 

Mace, " " .... 1 00 1 25 

Mixed Spice, choice to pure. 30 35 

Cream of Tartar, fine to pure 25 82 

STARCH. 

BRITISH AMERICA STARCH CO 

HRANTPORD. 

1st quality white, in kegs and brig 4{ 

1st quality white, 3 lb. cartoons,. 5J 

Lily White gloss, crates 6} 

Brantford gloss, 1 lb 7} 

Lily White gloss, 1 lb chromo.... 6f 

Canada Laundry, Boxes 4} 

Pure Prepared corn 7$ 

Challenge Corn 6| 

Rice Starch, fancy cartoons 8* 

" cubes 7} 

KINGSFORDS OSWEGO STARCH. 

Pure Starch — 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4 lb pack'g's 8 

36-lb " 31b. packages 8 

12-lb " 8$ 

38 to45-lb boxes 8 

Silver Gloss Starch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4"lb. pack'g's 9 

40-lb '' $ lb. package 9$ 

40-lb " ilb. " 10 

40-lb " assorted \ and J lbs. 9f 

6-lb " sliding covers 9$ 

38 to 45 lb boxes 9 



Oswego Corn Starch— for Puddings, 
Custards, etc. — 
40-lb boxes, 1 lb packages 81 



20-lb 



» 



ST. LAWRENCE STARCH CO. '8 



Culinary Starches— 

St. Lawrence corn starch 7 

Durham corn starch 6J 

Laundry Starches — 

No. 1, White, 4 lb. Cartons 4} 

" " Bbls 4| 

" " Kegs 4{ 

Canada Laundry 4 

Ivory Gloss, six 6 lb.bozes, slid- 
ing covers 6$ 

Ivory Gloss, fancy picture, 1 lb 

packs 6$ 

Patent Starch, fancy picture, 1 

lb. cartons 6} 

Ivorine Starch in cases of 40 
packages $3 00 



SUGAR. 



c. per lb 



Granulated 4} «i 

Paris Lump, bbls and 100 lb.bxs ... 51 

" " 50 1b. boxes 5g 

Extra Ground, bbls 5$ 

" " less than a bbl . . 6 

Powdered, bbls 6 5* 

" less than a bbl 51 

Extra bright refined 4$ 

BrightYellow 8j 4 

Medium " 3} 

Brown 3| 

SALT. 

Bbl salt, car lots 100 

Coarse, car lots, F.O.B 65 

" small lots 85 SO 

Dairy, car lots, F O.B 100 

" small lots 1*5 

" quarter-sacks 40 45 

Common, fine car lots 75 

" small lots 95 1 00 

Rock salt, per ton 18 00 

Liverpool coarse ,.. 75 80 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

Per lb. 
bbls. $ bbls 

2i 

21 24 

2| 3J 



SYRUPS. 



W. G. A. LAMBE & CO., 

GROCERY BROKERS 

TORONTO. 



GENTS FOR 



The St Lawrence Sup Refining Co,, 

MONTREAL. 



STICKING TO ONE LINE OF GOODS, satisfy yourself that 
* it is THE BEST, then RECOMMEND IT! PUSH IT! 
EDUCATE YOUR CUSTOMERS TO USE IT! 



This is better than keeping a collection of everything advertised to 
enable you to 

-•: Supply anything anybody asks for. 

Johnston's Fluid Beef good iW 

ALWAYS WANTED. ^ALWAYS APPRECIATED.] | 



Kingsford's Oswego 

STARCH. 



STRONCEST. PUREST. 



BEST. 



'THE ORIGINAL" 



"Silver Gloss" 

(Others so-called are imita- 
tions of our brand ) 

Pure Starch. 



FOR THE TABLE. 

Kingsford's 
Corn Starch. 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING 
JOBBERS IN CANADA. 



T. KINGSFORD & SON 



OSWEGO, N.Y. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 



$ 




PURE CALABRIA " Y. & S." LICORICE, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16s to pound. 
"ACME" LICORICE PELLETS, In 5-pound Tin Cans. 

TAR, LICORICE and TOLU WAFERS, in 5-pound Tin Cans. 

LICORICE "Y. & S." LOZENGES, In 5-pound Tin Cans and 5-pound Glass Jars. 
"PURITY," PURE PENNY-LICORICE, 100 and 200 Sticks in a Box. 



Manufactured 

Exclusively by 

1^* Where did you see this advertisement ? 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. 



Pricet current, continued— 

V.B 2§ 3 

E.V.B 2l 2} 

B.Superior 24 25 

XX 28 2l 

XXX 2} 3 

Crown 3 8J 

molasses. Per gal 

Trinidad, in puncheons.... 35 37 

" bbls 38 46 

" ), bbls 40 40 

New Orleans, in bbls 30 52 

Porto Rico, hdds 38 40 

barrels 42 44 

| barrels 44 46 

SOAP. 

Ivory Bar, 1 lb; bars per lb 5J 

Do. 2, 6-16 and 3 lb bars " 5 

Primrose,4J lb bars, wax W " 4i 

" 1 " " " *l 

John A, cake, wax W.perdoz 42 

Mayflower, cake, " " 42 

Gem, 31b bars per lb 34 

,l 13 oz, 1 and 2 lb. bars 3| 

?ueen's Laundry, per bar 6* 
ride of Kitchen, per box 2 75 

Sunshine, boxes, 100 tablets 6 50 

" 50 " 3 40 

mouse's soaps. Per lb 

Mikado (wrapped) 04* 

Eclipse ,f 04| 

Stanley Bar 04} 

Defiance 04J 

Toronto, 12 oz Perdoz 50 

Ruby, 10 oz " 30 

Monster, 8 oz " 24 

Detroit, 14 oz " 48 

Iiily White " 90 

Everyday " 80 

Queen City, 14 oz " 72 

Per box 

Mottled in 5 box lots, 100 bars... 5 00 

" " " 60 bars... 3 00 

Floater (boxes free) 6 50 

Electric 2 75 

Hard Water Electric 2 50 

Royal Laundry 3 25 

Octagon 4 00 

Per doz 

Royal Magnum 25 

" " 25 doz per box. 20 

Anchor, Assorted 10 

" Castile 50 

Morse's Assorted 45 

Morse's Roso 45 

" Windsor 45 

' Castile 45 

Bouquet, paper and wood 80 

Prize Magnum, White Castile . 72 

" " Honey 72 

" Glycerine 72 

" Oatmeal 72 

Per box 
" ' Honeysuckle ... 72 

Sweet Briar 85 

Extra Perfume 55 

Old Brown Windsor Squares .. 30 

. White Lavender 1 00 

' Per doz 

White Castile Bars 85 

White Oatmeal 85 

Persian Boquet, paper 2 50 

Oriental ... 45 

Pure Cocoanut, 3 doz. bxs, wood 40 

Heliotrope paper 150 

Carnation 60 

Rose Boquet 60 

Cocoa Castile 40 

Arcadian 45 

New Arcadian, per gross 4 25 

Ocean Coquet .- 45 

Barber's bar, per lb 25 

Pure Bath 1 00 

Magnolia 1 20 

Oatmeal 86 



Unscented Glycerine 90 

Grey Oatmeal 60 

Plain Honey 70 

Plain Glycerine 70 

Plain Windsor 70 

Fine Bouquet 100 

Morse's Toilet Balls 90 

TurkishBath 60 

Infants' Delight 1 20 

TEAS. 

CHINA G KEEN 8 

Gunpowder— per lb 

Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 
Young Hyson — 

Cases, sifted, extra firsts ... 42 50 

Cases, small leaf, firsts 35 40 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 

" " seconds 17 19 

" " thirds 15 17 

" common 11 14 

PING) SUETS. 
Young Hyson- 
Half chests, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

JAPAN. 

Half Chests- 
Choicest 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 12J 15 

Nagasaki, J chests Pekoe... 16 22 

" Oolong 14 15 

" " Gunpowder 16 19 

" " Sittings.... 5 9 
Congou — BLACK. 
Half Chests, Eaisow, Mon- 

ing, Pakling 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow... 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong lg 30 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 4o 

Pekoe Souchong 17 S5 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

British Consols, 4 's ; bright twist, 

5's ; Twin Gold Bar, 8s 67o 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8's 64 

Laurel, 3's 57 

Brier, 7's 55 

Index, 7's 60 

Honeysuckie,7's 58 

Napoleon, 8's 54 

Royal Arms, 12's 55 

Victoria, 12's 53 

Brunette, 12's 50 1 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 51 J 

" in 40 lb boxes 51 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T & 

B,3's 60 

Lily, 7's 55 

Diamond Solace, 12's 60 

Mvrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb tins 70 

J lb pg, 6 lb boxes 70 

oz pg, 5 lb boxes 70 

EMPIRE TOBACCO COMPANY. 
CUT SMOKING. 

Golden Plug, 2 oz. pkg boxes, 5 

lbs 65 

Uncle Ned, 2 oz. pkg, bxs 5 lbs 60 

Gem, 2 oz, packages, 5 lb boxes 61 

Gem, 8 oz tins in 6 lb cases 70 



PLUG SMOKING, 

Golden Plug 56 

Uncle John, 3x6, 3s. caddies 

16i lbs 54 

Gem. 3x6, 3s. caddies 16J lbs.... 53 
St. Lawrence, 2x3, 7s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 51 

Banner, 2x3, 7s. caddies about 

17lbs 48 

Sterlng, 2 x 3, 7s. caddies about 

17 lbs 46 

Louise, Solace, 12s. caddies about 

16 lbs 46 

Florence, Solace, 12s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 42 

Hawthorne, 8s. butts 23 lbs 47 

Semething Good, 6s. butts 21 lbs 46A. 

FANCY SWEET CHEWING. 

Good Luck, spun roll, 16 boxes 

4 lbs 65 

Empire, 3x6, 4s. spaced 8s. bxs 

41bs 61 

Top, 16 oz. spaced 8s. boxes 4 lbs 60 

Joy, 3 x 128., 14J oz. Spaced 6s. 

Rough and ready. Butts 25 lbs 52 
Judge, 2x3, 8s. Flat. Caddies 

about 20J lbs 50 

Currency, 3 x 3, 7s. Rough and 

ready. Caddies about 21 lbs. 49 
Kentucky, 1J x 3, 13s. Caddies 

about 21 lbs 50 

Kentucky, li x 3, 7s. Caddies 

about2lJ lbs 49 

BLACK SWEET CHEWING. 

Star, Narrow, 12s. Butts about 

22 lbs 47 

Morning Star, 12s. Butts about 

22J lbs 4SJ 

Montreal Twist, 12s. Caddies 

about 23 lbs 44 

Anchor Twist, 12s. Caddies about 

23 lbs 42$ 

oigabs— s. DAVIS & sons, Montreal. 

Sizes. Per M 

Madre E' Hijo, Lord Landsdow$60 00 

" " Panetelas 60 00 

" " Bouquet 60 00 

' " Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow 85 00 

" Reina Victoria 80 00 

" " Pins 65 00 

Bl Padre, Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Vict., Especial.. 50 00 

" Conchas de Regalia ... 50 00 

" Bouquet 65 00 

" Pins 50 00 

" Longfellow 80 00 

' • Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo.Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas 30 00 

Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes, all Tobacco- 
Cable 7 00 

ElPadre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION COT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

oigabettes. Per M- 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 00 

B. CNo.l 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 50 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

cut tobaccos. per lb 

Puritan, tenths, 5 lb. boxes 74 

Old Chum, ninths, 5 lb box 71 

Old Virgin. ,1-10 lbpkg, 10 lbbxs 62 
Gold Block, ninths, 5 lb boxes. 73 



cigabette tobacco. 

B. C. N. 1, 1-10, 5 lb boxes 

Puritan, 1-10, 5 lb boxes . 85 

Athlete, per lb 1 15 

Hyde Park 10 5o 

VINEGAR. 

A. HAAZ & CO 

XX, W.W 02c 

XXX, W.W 5 

Honey Dew 30 

Pickling 30 

Malting _ 

WOODENWARE. per doz 

Pails, 2 hoop, clear Nf 1... $1 70 

" 3 " " 1 90 

Pails, 2hoops, clear No. 2.. 1 60 

" 3 " " " .. 1 80 

" 8 " painted... " ... 1 80 

Tubs, No. 9 50 

1 8 00 

2 7 00 

" 3 6 00 

Washboards, Globe $1 90 2 00 

" Water Witch .... 1 40 

" Northern Queen 2 25 

Planet 1 70 

Waverly 1 60 

XX 1 50 

X 130 

" Single Crescent... 1 85 

" Double " ... 2 75 

" Jubilee 2 25 

" Globe Improved. 1 90 

" Quick and Easy . 1 80 

World 1 75 

" Rattler 1 30 

per case. 
Matches, 5 case lots, single cases 

Parlor 1 60 $1 65 

Telephone ... 3 60 3 70 

Telegraph.... 3 80 3 90 

Safety 4 20 4 30 

French 3 60 3 75 

Railroad (10 gro. in case) 

Single case and under 5 cs. $3 70 

5 cases and under 10 cases ... 3 60 

Steamship (10 gro. in case) 

Single oase and under 5 cs. 3 60 

5 cases and under 10 cases... 3 40 

per doz 

Mops and Handles, comb. 125 

Butter tubs $1 60 $3 20 

Butter Bowls, crates ast'd 3 60 



WASHING 
COMPOUND. 

Housekeeper's Quick- 
Washing per case. 
5c pkgs 100 in case ... 3 50 
10c ,r 60 in oase ... 4 00 



PEERLESS WASHING COMPOUND. 

per case 
Ya. lb packages, 12 doz in case ... $4 SO 
H " 6 " ... 8 90 

lib " 3 " . . 3 60 

5 ots " 100 " . . 3 50 

YEAST. 

barm mfg. co. per box 

1 box containing 2 doz. 6c. pkgs. 50 
1 '• "2 doz. 10c. " 1 00 





BREADMAKER'S 

per box 
So packages 36 in box 1 00 
>o " 45 in box 50 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



T HE E 



Sl.L 




E SUGAR REFINING CD'S 



GRANULATED 

AND YELLOWS 

AND 8YRUP8 

ARE PURE 

: fiO BliUEI^G : 

Material whatsoever is used in the manufacture of 



THE CANADA SUGAR REFINING GO'Y [limited], 

M O IST T IR TU .A. Xj. 

Manufacturers of Refined Sugars of the well-known Brand 




Of the Highest Quality and Purity, made by the Latest Processes, and the Newest 
and Best Machinery, not Surpassed Anywhere. 

Lump Sugar, in 50 and 100 lb. boxes. 

"CrOWIl" Granulated, Special Brand, the finest which can be made 

Extra Granulated, very Superior Quality. 

"Cream" Sugars, (not dried.) 

YellOW Sugars of all Grades and Standards. 

Syrups of all Grades in Barrels and Half Barrels. 

Sole Makers of high class Syrups in tins, 2 lb. and 8 lb. each. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Travellers' Guide, 

- The Alberta Hotel - 



CALGARY, N.W.T. 



Strictly first-class. Headquarters for Conniercial 
Men. Large sample rooms. 

H. A. PERLEY, Prop. 

The Hilliard House 

RAT PORTAGE, ONT. 



Strictly first-class. The favorite commercial 
house along the line of C P. K 

LOUIS HILLIARD, Prop. 

THE LELAND HOUSE, 

Portage La Prairie, Man. 

-Best sample rooms -west of Winnipeg. Strictly 
first-class. 

WM. NEVINS, Prop. 

Grand Pacific Hotel 

KAMLOOPS, B.C. 



The leading hotel in the city. Sample rooms 
convenient to stores, provided for commercial 
men 

H. 8MITH, Proprietor. 

The Hotel Wilson. 

NANAIMO, B. C. 

The largest and best Hotel in the city. 

JOS. RICHARDS, 

Proprietor. 

PURE CONFECTIONERY, 

FINEST BISCUITS. 

Manufactured by 

J. McLAUGHLAN & SONS, 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



J* 



Posters, 
Circulars,! 
Business 
Cards. 






Printers 

54 YongeSt. - Toronto 






Prices 
Richt 

Telephone 
I78S 






BUY THE BEST. 

SEELY'S 

Celebrated 
Flavoring 
Extracts, 

VANILLA, LEMON, 

and Assorted Flavors. 

Standard Goods of Am- 
erica (established in 
1862). Once tried, al- 
ways used. 

Seel) Manufacturing Co. 

Detroit, Mich. - Windsor, Ont. 




Wholesalers 

And 

Manufacturers 

When 

Considering 

Appropriation 

For 

Advertising 

For 

1893 

Remember 

THE 

CANADIAN GROCER 



THE RIPANS TABULES regulate the stomach, 
liver and bowels, purity the blood, are pleas- 
ant to take, safe and always effectual. A reliable 
remedy for Biliousness, Blotches on the Face, 
Bright^ Disease, Catarrh, Colic, Constipation, 
Chronic Diarrhoea. Chronic Liver Trouble, Dia- 
betes, Disordered Stomach, Dizziness, Dysentery, 
Dyspepsia, Eczema, Flatulence, Female Com- 

J faints, Foul Breath, Headache, Heartburn, Hives, 
aundice, Kidney Complaints, Liver Troubles, 



a Loss of Appetite, Mental Depression, Nausea. «. 



• Nettle Rash, 

• tion. Pimples, 

• to the Head, 

• plerion. Salt 
z Head, Scrof • 

ache, Skin Dis- 
Stomach/Tired 
Liver, Ulcers, 
and every oth- 
or disease that 




Painful Diges- 
Uush of Blood 
Sallow Com- 
llheum. Scald 
ula, Sick Head- 
eases, Sour 
Feeling.Torpid 
Wa t c r Brash 
er symptom 
r esults from 



impure blood or a failure in the proper perform 
ance of their functions by the stomach, liver and 
intestines. Persons given to over-eating are ben- 
efited by taking one tabule after each meal. A 
continued use of the Ripans Tabules is the surest 
cure for obstinate constipation. They contain 4 
w nothing that can be injurious to the most deli- * 
O cate. 1 gross *2, 1-2 gross $1.26 7 1-4 gross 76c., • 

• 1-24 gross 15 cents. Sent by mail postage paid. • 

• Address THE RIPANS CHEiUCAL COMPANY, • 

• P. O Box 678. New York. 

«»»«M3BocO**«*tse<Miao«acoaacM»M 



TIEUE 

OakYille Basket Co., 

MANUFACTTJBEB8 OF 




i, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets. 
1, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
1, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For sale by all Woodenware Dealer 



Oakville, Ont. 



DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE& SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT., 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly (all off. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE. 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



,* ORDE v R 

—IVORY. BAR 
'SOAP 



OLD CHUM 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PLUG AND CUT 



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Gboice 

Retailing 

Godfisb. 



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H. W. NORTHRUP&GO. 



St. John, N. B. 




JOHN PETERS & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 
and Brokers, 

Halifax, N. S. and 
Kingston, Jamaica, W.I, 

Agents for The E. B. EDDY MEG CO., 
HULL, P. Q. 



We are open to accept one or two more Agen- 
cies of first-class houses, either at Halifax or 
Kingston. We have a good connection and 
splendid storage facilities. 
References: The Merchants Bank of Halifax. 
The E. B. Eddy Agencies. Mfg Co., Hull.P.Q, 
The Mercantile Agencies. 



Tea Caddies all Sizes 

SPICE, BAKING POWDER AND TOBACCO TINS, 

AND TIN SIGNS, 

LITHOGRAPHED OR JAPANNED. 

Write our nearest house for Catalogue and Prices 

THE NTCLARY M'FG COMPANY, 



TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



RANGING BANQUET 




THE PEOPLE . . . 
ARE AWAKENING 
TO THE FACT . . 
THAT THE BEST 




LAMP Id friE 
WORLD IS . . 



THE 



jD lffSBURC 



VASE PIANO 

• • 
Write for Catalogue 



Although the Sales 
of this Lamp in the 
past year has been 
Enormous the out= 
look for this year 
is still better . . . 

(jOWans, [(ent « (o, 

Sole Wholesale Agents 
for Canada 

TORONTO and WINNIPEG 




TORONTO SALT WORKS, 

128 Adelaide E., Toronto, 

8ole City Agentsf or the "Canada Salt Association " 



Dealers in all kinds of Table, Dairy, Meat Car- 
ing, Barrel and Land Salts. 

The " Acme " Table Salt (new process) will not 
get damp or hard. 

Two Silver Medals, at Industrial Exhibition 
Toronto, 1890, for our "Acme" Table Salt and 
our "Star Brand" Dairy Salt. 

Florida Oranges, 
Almeria Grapes, 

Lemons, Cranberries, 
Nuts of all kinds, 

Figs and Dates. 

DAWSON & CO., 

32 WEST MARKET ST., 

Telephone 1471. TORONTO. 

Consignments of Produce Solicited. 

FAC SIMILB OF PACKAGE. 




M -18*0 XTi" -. r^>~ 

S-..|28 4d£uide5t:£a$t.. ^fl ', 

" ■-"PURJFIED 
GRANULATE! 



WILL 

NOT 
CET 

HARD 






-N 




MACLAREN'S 
IMPERIAL 

CHEESE 

IN GLASS JARS. 

LARGE, MEDIUM, SMALL, 
1 Doz. Case. 2 Doz. Case. 2 Doz. Case 

-:ALSO:— 

ROQUEFORT, cuncc Vt -., 
GORGONZOLA, SWISS, Etc., Etc. 



WRIGHT & COPP, 



Dominion Agents, 



TORONTO. 



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HYDE PARK, ATHLETE, PURITAN. DERBY. SWEET SIXTEEN CIGARETTES. 



S. DAVIS & SONS, LARGEST CIGAR MANUFACTURERS IN CANADA 



Published 

WEEKLY 

Cooper year 




TORONTO, JANUARY 27, 1893. 



No. 4 



COLMANS MUSTARD 



HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 



ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 



TWO • GOLD -JWED^LS 

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EXHIBITION LONDON 1B54 

0nty?ri$c#edaLIondon.lS62> kd? Only SilvterMcdal ."pans. W& 
Only^Vcdal Dublin. 1S65. §S? grand gold^edal^oscowl&72.X< 




ASK YOUR 
WHOLESALE GROCER 



-FOR- 



RAILROAD AND STEAMSHIP 

MATCHES 



GUARANTEED 
Second to None. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 
56 AND 58 FRONT ST. W. 

TOTIOZLSTTO- 




MAKE SIMPLY WITH BOILING MILK OR WATER 

. FOB SALE BY ALL GBOCEBS. 



DUNNS 
BAKING 
POWDER 

THECOOK'S BEST FRIEND 

Largest Sale in Canada. 



Don bjail to handle 



THE CELEBRATED IMPORTED 

MEMER'S 
CHOCDLATE 



ANNUAL SALES EXCEED 33 MILLION LBS. 

TO HAVE IT ADVERTISED 
FREE & FREELY 

IN YOUR OWN NAME AMONGST 
YOUR CUSTOMERS WRITE TO. 

C.ALFRED ChouILLOU agent Montreal. 



" LA CADENA " and " LA FLORA " The Cream of the Havana Crop. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The McKay Milling Co., Ltd., 

OTTAWA, 

Manufacturers of High Grade Patents, Strong Bakers, 

and Family Flours. 

OMX|Vl E A Li^^GranuIated, Mid Cut, Fine Cut, Flour Cut and Round Cut. 



WE MAKE THE CELEBRATED 



ROLLED OATS. 



ft. £n I . WA I SON, Manufacturing Gonfectioners, 



IF you wish to handle the MOST SALABLE 
CONFECTION in the market, try BALA LICO- 
RICE. We are Headquarters for Fine Choco- 
lates, Creams, Swiss Fruits and One Cent Goods, 
Icing Sugar, Cake Ornaments, etc 

SZEZNTID FOE PRICE LIST. 

75 Front Street East, 



KOFF NO MORE. 

WATSONS COUGH DROPS 

Will give positive and instant relief to 
those suffering from Colds, Hoarseness, 
Sore Throat, etc., and are invaluable to 
Orators and Vocalists. R. & T. W. 
stamped on each drop. Try them. 

TORONTO. 



The Norton Manufacturing Co. 

E P. Breckenridge, C. C. Warren, 

President. Secretary. 

£dwin Norton, W. C. Breckenridge, 

Vice-Pres. Mgr. & Treas. 



MAHDyACTUBEBB OF 



ITin Cans 

By Automatic Machinery. 

Fruit, Paint, Lard, Baking Powder, Fish, 
and Seamless Lobster 

CANS. 

Capacity, fifty thousand cans per day. 
Sole Agents in Canada for Norton Brothers 

11 Solder Hemmed" Caps. 

Inquiries and Correspondence Solicited. 

HAMILTON. - ONT. 



WASHING 
-COMPOUND- 

IS THE BEST 



SAVES LABOR, SAVES EXPENSE, 
SAVES TIME. 

Is not Injurious to tr\e Fiqest Fabric 

18 NOT INJURIOUS TO THE HANDS. 

u^ Pure Gold 
^'f\ Mfg. Co. 

31 FRONT STREET EAST, TORONTO 



:W- , 



fINE PRINTING 

54 YONGE St 

ro^oNTo. 





We have removed 
to our new premises, 
No. 146 & 148 Car 
ling St. Call and see 
us when in our City. 

GORMAN, 
ECKERT 
&G0. 

LONDON. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



ABOUT the ist of February we will offer 
to the trade, the largest collection of 
import samples ever shown by any 
house in Canada. The assortment will com- 
prise a great variety of China and Glass, 
both staple and fancy, and buyers will con- 
sult their own interest by looking through 
our show rooms before placing their orders 
for importation 



James ft. Skinner & Co., 



54 and 56 Wellington 
St. West, - - - - 



Also 

Vancouver, 

B.C. 



FRY'S 

Pure Concentrated 

COCOA. 



Is the strongest preparation of Cocoa 
made, and is absolutely pure, without 
flavoring matter or any other ingredi- 
ents. 

It is recommended by the highest 
medical authorities for its marvellous 
purity and strength and soluability. 
It is a profitable line to handle. 



The highest grade of Pure Cocoa manufactured. 
For sale by all leading dealers. 

Toronto Office, J. S. FRY & SONS, Wyi Wellington St, E. 



PRESERVITAS 



The use of this product has enabled 
Australian Butter Makers to capture 
the English Butter Market and obtain 
higher prices than is paid for any other 
make of butter — See Editorial Notes 
Canadian Grocer, in issue of Jan. 13. 



OR preserving Butter, Milk, 
Cream, Eggs, Meat, Poultry, 
Game, Etc., during the - 
Warmest Weather. 

Wanted, one Dealer in each District to sell Preservitas to Dairymen. 
Consignments of Butter, Cheese, Bacon, 

Lard, Eggs, Etc., solicited for the Markets Agent jZ\. P. kACjAlV, Halifax, N. S. 
of London, Liverpool, Glasgow and Halifax ' 




JAPAN TEAS 



Have advanced and are advancing. 
We can offer special values in 



Japan ^ibs 122 to 14c. 
in Japan Teas 13 to 15e 



Bevrbadoes Molasses Advanced 2c. per gall 



on. 



WE HAVE NOT CHANGED 

OUR PRICES FOR 



Choice Porto Rico in barrels 32c. 
Half barrels 34c. 



run supply of DR IED FRUITS ?8S3£'&!$£' 

Lightbound, Ralston & Co., 

Wholesale Grocers, 

MONTREAL, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




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MATCHES 

Indurated Fibre Ware, 
Woodenware, 

Washboards, 

TEA, TOILET, TISSUE 

and WRAPPING PAPERS, 

Are sold by all Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Ganada, 
Are recommended by all Users, and 

Are fully guaranteed by the Makers. 



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Toronto Branch: 29 Front St. W. 
Montreal Branch : 318 St. James St. 

MAMMOTH FACTORIES : 

HULL, • CANADA. 





Published 

WEEKLY- 

Cooper year 




Published in tl?e interest of (Jroeers, fanners, produce and provision Dealers 

and General Storekeepers. 



Vol. VII. 



TORONTO, JANUARY 27, 1893. 



No. 4 



J.B. McLEAN. 

President. 



HUGH C. McLEAN, 

Sec.-Treas 



THE J. B. McLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

AND 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

HEAD OFFICE: - . 10 Front St. E. 

MONTREAL OFFICE : - I 46 St. James St. 

E. Desbarats, Manager. 

NEW YORK OFFICE : Room 4 1 , Times Building. 

Roy V. Somervllle, Manager. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH : 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

Advertisers and Subscribers may have their 
correspondence addressed to the care of any of 
our offices and they are invited to use them at 
any time. At the Head office, Toronto, a place is 
set apart where they can see all the latest news- 
papers and the latest issues of trade papers from 
all parts of the world, where they can do their 
correspondence or obtain any information. Par- 
cels may also he directed to the Head office. 



In his inaugural address before the last 
meeting of the Toronto Retail Grocers' Asso- 
ciation President Clark strikes the keynote 
of progress. He has our congratulations 
and best wishes of success for the course he 
therein briefly outlined. If he is well sup- 
ported by his fellow-members — and the 
hearty acceptance of his views by the meet- 
ing indicates that he will be — the current year 
will be a bright one in the history of the 
Association. There is a large amount of 
latent usefulness in each member which can 
be developed by the plan Mr. Clark recom- 
mends — that is, the preparation and reading 
of papers upon matters of moment to the 
trade. It will be educative in two ways, 
both to those who give and to those who re- 
ceive, the exercise of the observing and in- 
vestigating faculties being of mental value 
to those preparing the papers, while the dif- 
fusion of the information so imparted will 
enlarge the general stock of information. 
The idea of a question drawer broached by 
Mr. Clark is also an excellent one, in fact 
one of the very best that could be adopted. 
If it is made liberal use of it will be a fertile 



source of enlightenment upon obscure or 
doubtful points, and will be a means of uni- 
fying the action of members in many ways. 
The practice of inviting wholesalers to ad- 
dress the Association upon special subjects 
cannot but tend to draw more closely to- 
gether the wholesale and retail branches of 
the trade in this city, and that feature of it is 
as valuable as its educative purpose. The 
Grocer will do all it can to further these 
and other useful objects of the Association, 
by keeping track of association movement 
in this country, the United States and Eng- 
land, and by publishing from the proceed- 
ings of other bodies whatever is analogous 
to doings here or is worthy of imitation. 
For The Grocer believes that the more 
the Toronto Association improves, the more 
thegeneral trade of the country will be bene- 
fited by this paper's reports of its meetings. 



While the year is young it is a good time 
for the members of the Retail Grocers' As- 
sociation, both as individuals and as a body, 
to insert punctuality as one of the unwritterj 
principles of their constitution and their un- 
deviating practice. The adoption of 10.30 
p.m. as the hour of adjournment of all meet- 
ings puts it out of the question to make up 
by lateness of sitting for lateness of assem- 
bling. There should be a unanimous pur- 
pose on the part of members to come early. 
The delays in waiting for the arrival of a 
quorum at meetings of committees have 
been a cause of annoyance to such members 
as are usually on time, and prove that the 
lack of punctuality at the regular meetings 
is not chargeable altogether to members not 
in office. At the last monthly meeting, Mr. 
Gibson, the Vice-president of the Associa- 
tion, who is chairman of all committees, de- 
clared upon taking office that he would not 
give any indulgence to this practice during 
the current year. He would make it a point 



to be on hand promptly at 8.30 on the even- 
ing appointed for any committee meeting, 
and if his colleagues were not there at that 
time he would not remain. Let all be 
prompt to the minute of meeting, and busi- 
ness will be lighter and brighter. When the 
proceedings are dragged out to late hours 
they partake of the dull spirit of sleepy men. 

* 
* * 

A partially disabled pumping service, the 
upheaval of the steel conduit that carries 
Toronto's water supply across the bay, and 
the fractures at several of the joints of that 
conduit threatened at one time to leave the 
city with an empty reservoir. The week be- 
fore last indeed the pressure was so feeble 
that people living on the higher levels were 
without water for domestic uses, hydraulic 
elevators could not be run and the city was 
left almost without fire protection. This last 
condition was the most serious. The ap- 
prehension of such danger caused some dis- 
quietude, as the most trivial fire, which could 
be quenched by a few pails of water, might 
be the beginning of a terrible conflagration 
through the want of a pressure sufficient to 
throw a stream on the flames. The fire in- 
surance companies looked upon this state of 
things with some alarm, and the Board of 
Underwriters showed an inclination to raise 
the rates. This would have been most 
heavily felt by the business men of the city, 
just at a time too when they would be most 
likely to avail themselves of insurance pro- 
tection. The city underwriters had the 
reservoir and pumping station inspected the 
other day, and as they found a great im- 
provement in the supply, it is supposed the 
inspectors will not report for an increase in 
the rates. They will, however, recommend 
that the city at once secure two large steam 
fire engines. Until the waterworks system 
is in better shape, merchants in this city will 
need to be very careful to take no chances 
from danger by fire. Carelessness as to 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



matches, stoves, furnaces, etc., may be the 
beginning of a disastrous ending. 

* * * 
The Markets and License Committee of 
this city has blotted itself out ot existence. 
The question which its self-effacement brings 
before the interest of the local grocery 
trade is : Upon what authority shall its du- 
ties devolve ? It is pretty certain that they 
will be divided up. Some ot the aldermen 
are apparently in favor of putting all licenses 
under police control. The inspection of 
fruit and provisions is proposed to be added 
to the functions of the health department. 
Both of these changes would probably be 
satisfactory to the grocers. They have long 
recognized the difficulty of enforcing the ob- 
servance of the pedlars' by-laws, with so 
small a staff as the license inspector, has at 
his command. On the other hand they look 
upon the police as the fittest persons to be 
the guardians of these laws. At present a 
pedlar may have a license or may not ; he 
may display his badge or conceal it; he may 
have more assistants than his license calls 
for ; and may be trading irregularly under 
the noses of a dozen police men, and remain 
unmolested. The offering of diseased and 
contagion-spreading fruit by unwashed Ita- 
lians is a matter that should be checked by the 
Board of Health.and long ago The Grocer 
recommended that all pedlars' fruits, etc., and 
the conditions of storage be regularly examin- 
edby health inspectors. This would lead to the 
condemnation and destruction of much of the 
cheap and dangerous trash that now is so in- 
jurious to the trade of rent-paying grocers. 
The pedlars have their friends, however, in 
the new council. Aid. Stewart, the chairman 
of the committee that has just extinguished 
itself, has a motion before the council to re- 
move the restrictions confining pedlars to 
particular streets, and another one providing 
that no increase be made in pedlars' licenses. 
Aid. Frankland has declared the licenses in 
many cases tyrannical. He is the mover of 
a resolution requiring that the license de- 
partment be abolished and that the business 
of issuing licenses and weighing of potatoes 
be done by the City Commissioner's depart- 
ment ; that the outside inspection be done by 
the poilce, and the inspection of meat, cattle 
and fruit be done by the Medical Health De- 
partment. 

* * * 

The accident insurance companies will 
no doubt look with satisfaction upon the 
change that is proceeding by degrees in the 



street railroads of the country from horse 
cars to electric cars. The change ought to 
be a good thing for their business. Traders 
who place any value upon their delivery ser- 
vice will find it a prudent thing to get horse 
and wagon under an accident policy, and 
the intrepid man who has the driving of the 
horse had better advise with himself if it is 
not wiser to drive more carefully and look to 
safety rather than despatch in landing his 
parcels. People on the street report some 
hair-breadth escapes of reckless drivers who 
have tried to take precedence of trolley cars 
at crossings. Owners should caution drivers 
that this is dangerous to situation as well as 

life. 

* * * 

It is not altogether certain that the grocers 
of Toronto will have pure ice for their 
refrigerators next summer. Ice dealers, 
in disregard of the by-law, are cutting 
on the Don and other forbidden places, 
and the brewers are supporting them in doing 
so, the latter claiming that they can better 
afford to pay the fine than to pay the differ- 
ence in the cost of ice brought from outside 
points. Charges have been laid before the 
Police Magistrate, but he has adjourned all 
cases until a pending appeal decided. In 
the mean time cutting goes on. The Grand 
Trunk Railway Co. has further complicated 
matters by withdrawing the special rate it 
had allowed to ice dealers, on the under- 
standing that ice would be brought from 
Lake Simcoe. It now returns to the rate of 
85c. a ton. Its reason for cancelling the 55c. 
rate is the action of the city \a granting per- 
mits to cut ice on the Don and elsewhere- 
Another element in the caldron of trouble 
the ice-question is involved in has been added 
by the Grenadier Ice Co. A member of that 
company has issued a writ against the city 
of Toronto claiming $30,000 damages by 
reason of the medical health department con- 
demning and prohibiting the cutting of ice 
on the Grenadier pond. The plaintiff claims 
that analysis has shown that the water of 
the pond is absolutely pure. 

* * * 

It is now time for Canada to stand upon 
her rights in the British market. There may 
have been a time when it was prudent to 
keep the term " Canadian" in the back 
ground, when either the quality of our pro- 
ducts or the prejudice of British consumers 
stood in the way of a consumptive demand 
in the United Kingdom for goods bearing 
Canadian labels or brands. In those cir- 



cumstances British shopkeepers found it to 
their interest to represent our goods as of 
domestic or foreign production. Thus, not 
so loug ago, our butter was not much to 
our credit, and both Canadian shippers 
and British retailers were content not 
to obtrude the name "Canadian" upon 
consumers. Now, however, our butter is ' 
rising in the esteem of the British people 
and we begin :o want the advertisement 
that should accompany its better standing. 
Prof. Robertson, in the report he has pre- 
pared of his visit to England, draws atten- 
tion to the fact that our cheese is to a very 
large extent retailed as "best English." 
The retailers who thus deprive us of our 
rights are of course reaching out for high 
prices, but they could get them just as read- 
ily if they would give us our due. They 
could easily show that " best English " is 
no better mark than " choice Canadian," and 
if they would lend their influence to make 
the latter the distinguishing term for the 
best cheese they would make as much 
money. We object to United States ship- 
pers using the name " Canadian " to cover 
inferior cheese. We just as logically and as 
strongly object to English sellers suppress- 
ing our merit. 

* * * 

A reader draws our attention to the adver- 
tisement of a retail competitor in a local 
paper, and asks if this is legitimate business. 
There can be no two opinions about whether 
it is or not. The advertisement announces 
that a list of prices therein given will hold for 
but two hours, on Saturday evening. The 
prices are marked down forty to fifty per 
cent, below regular quotations. The adver- 
tiser takes the precaution to say the supply 
of goods is limited, and that therefore they 
will not be sold in large quantities, nor sold 
to other merchants. This sort of offer is 
used as a crowd bait. People are expected 
to muster in droves and make a lively two 
hours, not only in the lines sacrificed but in 
other goods as well. It is on the other 
goods that the salesmanship will be con- 
centrated and the profit will be made. There 
will be no forcing of business in canned corn 
and peas at 5c. The warning of the advertise- 
mentthat the stock of thesecheapgoodsis low- 
will come in handy to cover a timely retreat 
when orders are too numerous. The goods 
will run out, but that is no reason why the 
crowd should be allowed to go. They will 
be plied hard with offers of something else, 
and will probably be induced to buy liberally 
and pay liberally too. Such trade has its 
disadvantages. It does not build up public 
confidence in a man, and is therefore not a 
stable basis to go either far or long upon. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



SUN-PRIED AND EVAPORATED 
APPLES. 

The course of the dried apple market has 
this year been peculiar. Though the supply 
was large it had the benefit of a demand of 
unusual capacity. This latter favorable con- 
dition was due to shortage in the crop of 
raw material in the United States, a short- 
age which occurred in spots, the spots coin- 
ciding with the districts convenient for the 
pioduction of dried apples and always con- 
nected with that industry. United States ex- 
porters consequently had to cast about for 
supplies,and that brought them on this mar- 
ket. Of course the price in that country 
ever reached a point that the people of the 
United States could afford to consume 
our apples. The duty would prevent 
that. But there was an unusually large 
quantity of sun-dried fruit bought here by 
United States shippers, and carried through 
in bond for export. Though the demand 
was a roomy one it did not favor any price- 
nursing policy on the part of holders. If the 
fruit could not be got at a price that would 
leave the shipper a margin it would be left 
with the holder. The bulk of the purchases 
have been made from country holders at 4%" 
to 5c. There is still a good market, but 
stock appears not to be offering freely. The 
very large quantities already handled by buy- 
ers would indicate that this backwardness 
is due to the want of stock, and not to 
any rise in the ideas of holders. Of course 
the supply can be replenished. There is 
undoubtedly a good deal of whole fruit in the 
country, for which, unless it is superior stock, 
there is not an inviting market. It will de- 
preciate with holding, and can be sold at 
about $1 a bushel if made into dried apples. 
This is the most profitable way of disposing 
of it, and this plan will almost certainly be 
followed. The buyers of green fruit last fall, 
who had such bright visions of the future 
export market, often purchased at prices 
that could not be realized. Many of these, 
though they had paid their forfeit, allowed 
the contract to lapse and left the apples with 
the growers. In this way it comes about 
that there are considerable quantities of raw 
material in the country that holders had ex- 
pected to get rid of at high prices early in 
the season. The demand will widen in 
spring, and it is likely there will be a place 
found for every quarter that can be picked 
up. 
The call for Canadian evaporated apples 
«. has likewise been strong and steady, and has 
swallowed up an unusually large pack, for 
this year's output has been a very large one 
and there is a very small remnant of it left 
unconsumed, or at least unshipped. Its 
speedy absorption is also owing to the 
shortage in the United States crop. The 
price has ranged from 7^ to 9c. But the 
demand has drawn a sharp distinction be- 
tween old and new stock. Nobody wants 
old fruit, and it would be no trouble to col- 



lect five or six cars of it at easy prices, some 
of it being purchasable at 5^c. This oldstock 
is reminiscent of the dreary failure to effect 
a corner in evaporated apples a year ago. 
Operators bought a good deal of stock, but 
found that their fiat could not make the price 
it was to be again sold at. Exaggerated 
ideas spoiled the market and spoiled some 
of the fruit too, some of the residue now of- 
fering being rather sour smelling stock. 

Dried apples have been a satisfactory line 
this year to the general merchant. He may 
not have realized a big margin of profit upon 
them, but they have been more readily con- 
vertible into money than most other lines of 
produce. Where he has taken them in trade 
or on account, this is no small consideration, 
as it enables him to bring a barter trade 
pretty closely to a cash basis The fruit 
being marketed in the fresh state, and not 
held for high prices, its value was always 
obtained and the market was always recep- 
tive. 

THE COUNTER TEA MIXER. 

W. H. Gillard & Co., wholesale grocers, 
Hamilton, ate introducing to the trade an 
article that certainly has not appeared before 
its time. It is the Counter Tea Mixer, an 
indispensable adjunct of the retail grocery 
trade. The need of such an article has been 
strongly felt for a long time, and it is that 
need which has summoned this particular 
Mixer into existence. It is an entirely new 
thing, it is admirably adapted for its pur- 
pose, a well-defined want awaits it, and it 
will soon over-run the whole grocery trade. 
The grocer now rightly looks upon his tea 
business as the mainstay of his trade. His 
customers' taste, happily run towards mix- 
tures and thus in the direction of his own 
profit. People are becoming more and more 
sensitive to the odor and flavor of foreign 
substances in their tea, and the handling of 
fish, soap, onions, tobacco, oil, and like 
goods is fatal to the cleanly intermixture of 
different kinds of tea by the hand process. 
These facts have created the conditions 
which called for the Counter Tea Mixer, and 
very fully the Mixer corresponds with all the 
circumstances of the want it is intended to 
fill. Everywhere that Gillard & Co.'s travel- 
lers have shown the Mixer, it has com- 
manded an order, though it has been but a 
matter of days since the travellers had sam- 
ples to show. 

The Mixer is made entirely of hard brass 
(highly polished), and with ordinary care 
will last a lifetime. It is handsome in ap- 
pearance and an ornament to any counter. 
It can be placed on the scale with a counter 
weight and the tea weighed in the Mixer. 
It saves time — a pound of tea can be mixed 
perfectly in two seconds. A few revolutions 
of the Mixer and the tea is better mixed 
than if mixed by a scoop or by hand for half 
an hour. It attracts attention aud increases 
sales. It pleases customers to see tea thor- 
oughly and nicely mixed. The verdict of 



present users is, that it is the handiest article 
ever placed on a counter, and a grocer using 
it a few days would feel lost without it. Sent 
by express to any address on receipt of 
$1.50. Nickel-plated 50c. extra. Readers 
are referred to the advertisement on another 
page. 



THE CHEAP VALENCIAS. 

The Grocer has referred from time to 
time, both specially and in its regular mar- 
ket reports, to the offerings of cheap trashy 
Valencia raisins to the trade this season, 
and the likelihood of importers who were 
tempted by the low offers and bought the 
goods losing money. This becomes more 
and more of a certainty as the season ad- 
vances, for the fruit is offering for almost 
anything, and the unfavorable reception 
that it has got must be disheartening to 
interested importers. The fact that the fruit 
has to be sold, if possible, is working an im- 
mense amount of harm to business, for buy- 
ers in the country who hear of low offers at 
the big markets like Montreal and Toronto 
don't stop to consider the pros and cons of 
the subject, or realize thoroughly what such 
low figures mean, in the face of compara- 
tively high prices on sound fruit. If so they 
would see at once that a seller could hardly 
afford to sell merchantable goods at 4c. and 
under with seconds regularly quoted at i,y% 
to 4>£ c - m round lots from first hands in 
Montreal. 

A comparison of the range of prices on 
this cheap fruit since it was first offered, 
considered in relation with the regular course 
of the market, is another argument for care- 
ful discrimination. Valencia raisins have 
ruled in light supply throughout the fall and 
winter, and the basis of value on seconds to 
firsts has been a pretty steady one, between 
A l A to 5>£c., according to quality. Yet in 
the face of this, offers of this cheap stock 
have been made at steadily declining figures. 
On its first appearance it was offered at 
4Xc, and some were sold, but the quality 
was so disappointing that the buyers would 
not accept delivery. This was followed by 
offers at steady fractional declines — first to 
4jlSc., then 4c, and now less than 4c. would 
certainly be accepted to effect a sale. It 
must be something very special that induces 
this spirit of concession, especially as several 
consignments of good seconds have been re- 
ceived and turned over between the 20th 
December and the present time in Montreal 
on a basis of 4>£c. from first hands. Buyers 
no doubt can argue for themselves on these 
premises,and although the market cannot be 
called active, the moderate but steady 
volume of business that transpires in good 
to prime fruit on a fairly steady basis, infers 
that a good number have made up their 
minds and are acting accordingly. The re- 
luctant ones will no doubt follow suit and in 
this event a still lower offer on the poor 
stock may be expected. 



6 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A BIG JUMP IN EGG PRICES. 

The egg market is a decidedly interesting 
one at present, and some Montreal operators 
who got control of respectable supplies ear- 
lier in the season are correspondingly happy. 
The past week was one of the most success- 
ful of the season, and the wholesale turn- 
overs have had a very satisfactory effect on 
prices. A jump of from 4 to 5c. has been 
made. This is due principally to the demand 
on American account, which has aver- 
aged over 400 packages daily for the 
past fortnight, which means a respect- 
able aggregate. As high as 22c. has 
been paid for Montreal limed, in lots, and 
23c. has been made on single cases. The 
light supply is another strong factor for argu- 
ing higher prices, Montreal picklers claim- 
ing that they have very little more than 
enough to meet actual requirements. Of 
course the local consumptive demand is 
somewhat restricted on account of the ad- 
vance in prices, but this does not bother 
holders at all, as they are confident in view 
of the condition of the market, of realizing 
their own prices. 



MOLASSES A GOOD THING. 

The available supply of Barbadoes mo- 
lasses in Montreal at the present time is 
smaller than it has been in years, and hold- 
ers have a correspondingly high idea of the 
value of their property. At the end of the 
year it is doubtful if there was much over 
2,000 puncheons to be had. Since that time 
the absorption on account of the regular con- 
sumptive demand has pulled stocks down 
materially, so that everything will be wanted 
to supply the trade between now and next 
spring. In fact 1,000 to 1,200 puncheons is 
given as the stock, and as it is all in second 
hands and principally controlled by two 
French wholesale houses, it would take a 
considerable inducement in the shape cf an 
advance to make them deprive themselves 
of supplies for the benefit of others. 
Accordingly no offer for a round lot 
will be considered now, as the steady 
jobbing demand to fill actual wants on the 
basis of 34c. is quite satisfactory to holders. 
In fact, there are some who calculate on the 
possibility of a shortage between now and 
the time new supplies are received in the 
spring, and look for higher figures This 
position of affairs means some handsome 
piofits to some Montreal dealers who bought 
when prices were around 28 to 29c, and the 
word "molasses" brings a complacent smile 
from some and a disappointed grimace from 
others. Reports differ of the margins made, 
but they ran all the way from $3,000 to 
$8,000. 



ASSOCIATION ITEMS. 

Here are a few of the questions asked at a 
meeting of a grocers' association in Michi- 
gan : 

How many grocers in the city know how 
to run a good grocery ? 

What would be the result to our associa- 
tion if we would all change to the cash sys- 
tem, and not take orders ? 

Do grocers, as a rule, give a treat to a 
customer each time he pays his account — 
say weekly ? 

Is it profitable for dealers to take orders ? 

What makes cleaned currants worth from 
three to four cents per pound more than un- 
cleaned ? 

What benefit does a grocer derive from 
cutting prices ? 
An agent has been employed by the Minne- 
apolis Retail Grocers' Association to work 
among the grocers, to see that agreements 
are lived up to, and to work for the general 
interests of the association. So many gro- 
cers of the city appeared indifferent to their 
own welfare that the association found it ne- 
cessary to resort to something like heroic 
measures to bring about a better state of 
things. The whole time at the last meeting 
was taken up in discussing the question of 
giving the special agent method a fair trial, 
and it is hoped good results will follow. 

The Boston Retail Grocers' Association 
had a big reunion at its twelfth annual din- 
ner last week. 

A new grocers' association has been 
started in Brockton, Mass. The members 
have signed an agreement to stop giving 
credit to chronic dead-beats. If any mem- 
ber trusts a blacklisted consumer, that mem- 
ber is fined $25. 



THE INDIAN AND CEYLON TEA 
CROP. 

In all probability, says The English- 
man, the Indian tea crop of 1892-3 will 
not exceed that of the previous season, 
and even the most sanguine can only 
look for an infinitesimal increase. With 
the prices ruling at the opening of 
the season such a falling off in the anti- 
cipated increment for the season of 10,- 
000,000 of pounds would have meant ruin 
to many planters, but fortunately the 
home market during the past three 
months has awakened to the fact that 
the supply from India will be far short 
of that anticipated, and with Ceylon 
equally deficient, and China showing its 
annual decline in export, prices have 
risen. The averages realized at the last 
few public auctions in Calcutta must 
have gratified managers as well as share- 
holders. It may be said that the rise 
in price has more than compensated for 
the falling-off in out-turn, and that pros- 
pects for the coming season are brighter 
than they have been for several years 
past. The supply of tea is certainly not 
equal to the d«mand, and stocks at home 



will be depleted before the next crop can 
be placed on the London market. In 
former years, when Ceylon had not en- 
tered the arena as a serious competitor, 
the prospect! would have been more than 
bright, but with this vigorous competi- 
tion the spring season at home is no 
longer what it was for Indian planters. 
The new Ceylons now reach the London 
market at the very time when India is 
barely beginning to manufacture for the 
nevv season, and of necessity it will bene- 
fit first from the depleted state of the 
home market, But India must also gain 
with every pound of tea sent forward 
early in the season. Under the circum- 
stances the question of pruning will oc- 
cupy the serious attention of the planter 
during the next two months, for he must 
know that as he prunes so he will reap, 
either early or late. This is specially 
true of those parts where the China 
plant predominates. The fact to bear in 
mind is that in the coming season the 
race will be to the swift, and the advan- 
tage will rest with those who get their 
teas first to market. Darjeeling and the 
Duars are to a certain extent favorably 
situated in this respect. Although the 
heavy prices that are now being realized 
will more than compensate for the short- 
er out-turn, the remark must be taken 
in general sense. There are districts such 
as the Dar jeering Terai, where, owing 
to the ravages of mosquito blight, no 
rise in price can cover the disastrous 
yield of the present season. So serious, 
indeed, is the situation in some parts 
that there is nothing for it but abandon- 
ment, and that means instant sacrifice 
of invested capital. In many instances 
not a third of the estimated crop has 
been gathered. Mosquito blight set in 
unusually early, and with its appear- 
ance many gardens ceased to yield. It 
is no exaggeration to say that the many 
lacs of rupees that have been spent in 
opening up the Darjeering Terai have 
been practically thrown away. All en- 
deavors to deal with the blight have 
been unavailing, and in many instances 
it has been decided to allow the garden 
to run into jungle for a period of, say, 
two years. So far, the low China plant 
has succumbed to the attack of the pest, 
but in some cases even the best plant 
has begun to feel its effects, and the 
neighboring district of the Duars has 
this year found it spreading. Mosquito 
is as deadly as the leaf disease in Ceylon, 
and it is but poor consolation to learn 
that other districts have so far escaped 
the blight. It would surely be worth 
while if the Tea Association were to se- 
cure one of the abandoned gardens in 
the Terai, and institute at the general 
test a series of experiments with the ob- 
ject of discovering a cure for the disease. 
^This very blight at one time threatened 
North Assam with ruin, and it is said 
to have disappeared after a few years, 
but nothing certain is yet known as to 
the causes which led to the sudden mi- 
gration of this terrible pest. It is in- 
deed lamentable to see a model tea gar- 
den, otherwise healthy and well cultivat- 
ed, and to know that every shoot that 
appears is doomed by this plague. An 
expert is now in the country from the 
Tea Association analyzing the various 
soils, and this may lead to some good. 
But so far his services have not been di- 
rected to the district where blight is so 
prevalent, and which is now on the point 
of being abandoned wholesale. Obvious- 
ly that is the point to which the inves- 
tigations of the expert should be direct- 
ed, for it is the latest battle-field upon 
which this pernicious insect has inflict- 
ed a serious reverse on human industry 
and enterprise. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



DINNY CALLAHAN 

AT THE TORONTO RETAIL GROCERS' 

"AT HOME." 

" Oi wuz to the Groshers' 'At Home' 
lasht noight, Moike, an' such a toime 
ez Oi had— yez niver saw the loike. Oi 
wuz invited be the boss. Sez he,"Dinny, 
me bye,would yez loike to go to the ball 
this evenin' ?" " Fwhat Ball?" sez Oi. 
" Why, the Toronty Eetale Groshers' 
Annual Conshert and Ball down to Mish- 
ter Harry Wibb's Atin' House," sez he. 
" It will be a grand trate fer yez, Dinny, 
Yez will see all the grate min an' mash- 
ter moinds o' the thrade there, an* the 
purty gurls— think o' that, Dinny ; an' 
the atin' an' drinkin'." 

" All roight," sez Oi, thinkin' o' the 
purty gurls an' the lushins an' that,, 
" much obloiged to ye, Oi'm shure," an' 
wid that the Boss raches me out a 
pashteboard wid some writin' printed on. 

Win Oi had the ould horse comfortably 
tucked away for the noight in the barn 
an' grabbed a bit o* tay, Oi goes to me 
room above the shtable an' drisses me- 
self in me besht clothes, me softesht bro- 
gans on me fate, wid a high rollin' 
shtand up collar around me shwan loike 
nick, an' an illigant green nicktoi shpot- 
ted wid rid, an' a pair o' brown mitts 
on me fingers, an' shteps on the throlley 
an' down Oi sails to Wibb's. 

Win Oi raches the Atin' House Oi walks 
through the dure an' up to a table 
where a foine lookin' gintleman wuz sit- 
ting shtrokin' his flowin' moustache an' 
lookin' purty ,an' whisperin' funny things 
to a dark haired son o' Palestoine by his 
soide. Ez Oi walks up the foine lookin' 
gintleman shtops me, an', lookin' me up 
an' down, sez, " Oi think yez hev mish- 
taken the place, moi frind, this is not a 
fancy driss carnival, or are yez lookin' 
fer yer brother freaks at the Musee ?" 
" Bad cess to ye ye grinnin' shpalpeen," 
sez Oi, " d'yez know who Oi am ? Oi'm 
Dinny Callahan as drives the delivery 
waggon for Patrick Doolin, the Queen 
shtreet grocer, an' here's me card," an' 
wid that Oi shlaps down the pashteboard 
Mr. Doolin hed given me, an' marches 
up wid a lot o' other fashionable ladies 
an' gintlemin just coming in. 

Win Oi gets to the back part o' the 
room another illegant arishtocrat shtops 
me and sez, " Lave youre ulsther an' fur 
cap down here before interin' the ball 
room." " All roight," sez Oi, wid a wink. 
" Fhwat interist d'yez charge for four 
months on me coat an' cap ?" He looks 
at me wid oiys loike two saucers an' sez, 
" This is not York shtreet, moi frind ; yez 
don't see three balls here— only wan," an' 
wid a grin loike an alligator he hands 
me out a shlip o' paper wid a number 
printed on it, an' thin Oi sees at wance 
it wuz a new game. 

Ez Oi wint up the shtairs a'feelin' noice 
all drissed in me besht clothes Oi runs 
agin me ould Hamilton Boss, Mishter 
Adam Ballantine, whose beautiful shtore 
is the proide of John shtreet south and 
an ornament to the risidents of Cork- 
-town. Wid Mishter Bailantin/e wuz a 
ladin' grocer o' the Ambitious City, Mish- 
ter Chas. Bremner. Oi wuz plazed be- 
yant exprission to see me ould frind, an' 
loike the gintleman he is, he introduces 
me to all the grate groshers, green an 
dry (an', judgin' by their looks, mosht 
o' them wuz very dry indade), drissed in 
shwallowtail coats, white gloves, an' a 
whole biled shirt all visible to wanst. 
Ah, Moike, they wuz illigant gintlemen, 
but they didn't seem to know fwhat to 
do wid their hands an' fate, they wuz 
shquirmln' round so an' feelln' o' their 



white necktois an' shtand-up collars an' 
pressin' out the erases in their new 
shtore pants. 

There wuz Mishter Booth, the re-toired 
ex-prisident, and Martin McMillan (bless 
his honest sowl) sittin' on the table in 
the hall, handin' out programmes an' 
pressin' out the wrinkles in their new 
pants an' pressin' fresh wrinkles in the 
tails of their cutaway coats, both of 
them tryin' to look "At Home,' 'wid the 
odds agin 'em tin to wan. An' then Oi 
wuz presented to Prisident Clark, an' a 
foine gintleman he wuz, indade. He wuz 
a troifle nervous in his new suit, but had 
a shmoile fur ivirybody, an' although his 
new kid gloves wuz two soizes too shmall 
an' burstin wid " suppressed feelin'," 
(moind the joke, Moike), he niver moinded 
it wan bit. 

Mishter Clark took me into the concert 
hall an' prisinted me to His Honor Judge 
Gibson, the celebrated buther, eggs, an' 
dairy expert. Sez Oi to the Judge, win 
he had prodded me in the ribs, " It's a 
foine noight to-noight, an' it's a foine 
crowd yez do be havin' here." Wid a 
couple o' licks o* his rosy lips an' a dozen 
or so winks o' his ristless oiys, he sez, 
" Yes, it's foine, very foine, an-" (stoop- 
in' down an' whishperin' in me ears so ez 
Clark couldn't hear him) an' Oi did it, 
me an' Mills over there lanin' up agin 
the lunch counter. Wid a wink at Mills 
that gintleman comes over to us, an' 
Mishter Gibson introdushes me to the 
distinguished missionary to the pedlars. 

Ah, Moike, it wuz wid feelin's of sat- 
isfaction an' proide Oi grashped the 
hands of the different distinguished mer- 
chant princes, an' Oi wur wizhin' yez had 
been wid me. But, Moike, me heart near- 
ly burst wid joy win Oi looked around 
the ball room, an' me oiyes rested on the 
picture of beauty forninst me. Ah, Moike, 
yez may brag about the gurls in the 
west or the east or inywhere, but the 
shweet gurls of Toronty thet wuz at this 
ball wur the prittiest the sun shines on. 
They wuz purtier than pictures in gilt 
frames, wid their purty drisses an' flow- 
ers an' plisant shmoiles. 

Then there wuz the illigantest shweet- 
est music by Glionna's (divil a bit can Oi 
pronounce the nagur's name) Oitalian 
band. Oi niver took much shtock in them 
Dagos, but, Moike, them fellers can make 
a corpse dance. Me feet wuz ristless at 
the ind o' the second bar. 

Oi could tell yez much more o' inter- 
estin' things o' this grate ball, about the 
concert, the singin' of Mishter Cowan's 
Dimmock, the radin' an' recitin' of Mish- 
ter Smiley, and the wonderful ventrilo- 
quistic performances of Mr. Simpson, but 
Moike, I know yez would loike to hear 
about the distinguished company more 
than anything. 

Oi wuz lookin' around the room whin 
me oi risted on Mishter Kinnear (Tommy) 
for whom yez used to travel in the city 
till yez asked him fur a raise, whin he 
foired ye to break in another unsuspectin' 
duck like yourself. Oi had me oiyes on 
him, an' thought Oi saw him lookin' 
about in the crowd fur a new thraveller, 
but Oi wuz mishtaken ; he wuz lookin' 
round for his bosom frind, Mishter Lang. 
Thin Oi saw Mishter Larkin In the cor- 
ner of the room wid wan hand on Mish- 
ter Butcher's shoulder an' the other in 
his trouser-pocket, an' I knew then he 
wuz lecturin' on Salada tea. 

Genial John Shloan wuz there an' cast- 
in' his beamin' shmoiles around in his 
usual happy manner, an' Oi noticed 
ivirybody wuz tryin to shake hands wid 
hi to wanst. Oi did not see his partner 
Mishter Crowther, but wuz towld later 



in the evenin' that that gintleman wuz 
tryin' to foind the profits they had made 
in canned goods lasht year, but the hope- 
less tashk wuz loikely to make him walk 
more stoop-shouldered than iver. 

Oi heard a frightful noise from a cor- 
ner of the room an' then a breakin' o 
the bass fiddle in the band. Percy Eck- 
hardt had laughed. Mishter Eckhardt 
wuz relatin' to a blvy of friends how he 
had shtuffed Mishter Kinnear wance 
about the travellin' expinses of his min, 
how they could thravel illegantly on wan 
dollar per day, and Mishter Kinnear had 
gone right to his shtore an' charged up 
all back expinses, including postage on 
orders sint in an' car fare of his city trav- 
eller as well. 

An' thin there wuz Mishter Willie an' 
Mashter Jamie Ince hobnobbin' wid Quar- 
termaster Adams of the 48th Highland 
Regiment. Mishter Adams wuz drissed 
this noight ; he had on his breeks— he wuz 
not wandering round in dishabille. Oi 
notished Mishter Adams was dancing 
ivery dance an' perspiring loike it wuz 
July 1st an' he on parade. 

Thin there wuz Mishter Harry Mc- 
Cuaig, bither known among the byes as 
the " Monsoon" brand of pure Indian tay. 
He troid for half an hour to make me 
belave he wrote Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay. He 
left early in the evenin'. He intinded go- 
in' to Brantford. 

Mishter Boomer, like Mishter Crowther, 
wuz conspicuous by his absence. He was 
at the Athenaeum Club practishing a 
new walk, but Willie Warren towld me it 
is a hopeless job ; he had been tryin' to 
inshtruct him for several years. An- 
other prominent gintleman, whose pris- 
ence I noticed by his absince, was Joseph 
Fisher Eby, but Mishter John I. David- 
son towld me at supper time that he wuz 
out huntin' up votes for the Board of 
Thrade election in the interests of Mish- 
ter E. B. Osier. 

Moike, it wuz a grate soight to see 
Mishter Gibson arrum in arrum wid the 
grate Kurnel Davidson of the 48th Bigi- 
ment, introducing the grand warrior to 
the ladies an' gintlemen, an' gainin' re- 
flicted honor in the transaction. It wuz 
a grate noight fur Mr. Gibson ; he wuz 
makin' himself solid wid iverybody— the 
nixt ilections are comin' on. 

An, Moike, yez ought to ha' seen the 
liberality o' the Toronty Biscuit and Con- 
fectionery Co. The whole gang wuz 
there, up in the shmokin' room, lookin' at 
the purty picture cards Mishter Wibb 
had forgotten to take off the table;s, 
an' how the progrissive young hustlers 
wuz dalin' out cigars, at their own ex- 
pense, too, d'ye moind that. They hand- 
ed me wan, but Oi wuz sober an' didn't 
shmoke it. Oi'm kapin' it fur you, Moike, 
yez hev a strong shtomick. 

But, Moike, the greatest soight of this 
mimorable noight wuz win Mishter Tom- 
my Kinnear and Mishter J. W. Lang swiuz 
sittin' at the table together in the din- 
in' room, atin' so paceable loike an' 
frindly. Think o' that Moike. It wuz a 
touching soight, an' Oi had to lave the 
table an' go out into the hall an' shid 
tears o' joy. Thin there wuz Archie Hut- 
chinson, wid a package of St. Lawrence 
Corn Starch sticking out of his trousers' 
pocket. Oi wuz kapin me oi on Archie ; 
he's a loikely lad, win there's purty 
gurls about. Archie was tryin' to thrade 
a package of cookin' starch for a bar 
o' Surprise Soap with Mr. Wright, but 
Henry towld him it wouldn't wash— 
imanin' the soap, af coorse. 

Ah, Moike, Oi could kape yez interest- 
ed all noight, there wuz so much to see 
an talk about, but whin OI see ye agin' 



8 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



next summer at the Groshers' Picnic 01*11 
tell ye all about the greatest and best 
At Home iver held by the Toronty Retale 
Groshers' Association. Yure frind, 

DINNY CALLAHAN. 

P. S.— Oi wuz nearly forgotten some- 
thin' viry important. Mlshter Richard 
Donald, jr., wuz tbere, too, but in a very 
inconspicuous attitude, and not wanst 
durin' the whole blessed evenin' did Oi 
hear that basement voice o' his castin' 
the pearls o' his wisdom before the as- 
simbled thousands. An' thin, ez I wuz 
lookin' pasht Mishter Donald Oi sees 
Mishter Stephen Hustwitt, the great tea 
reformer, down on his knees, down on his 
knees befure Mishter W. G. Campbell 
openin* up a tea debate wid prayer. 
Ah, it wuz very touchin 2 indade.— D.C. 



CHOOSING A COST MARK. 

Ever since the storekeepers bought at 
wholesale and sold at retail, it has been 
a thne-honored custom, to make the cost 
and selling price upon articles for sale. 
That these marks, or at least the cost 
mark, might be clear and enlightening 
to the merchant and his employees, while 
baffling and untranslatable to the rest 
of the world, considerable ingenuity is 
sometimes employed, but the average 
man is content to take some easily re- 
memberable word having ten letters to 
represent the ten Arabic numerals. 

The choice of a cost mark is an easy 
matter. The most common thing is the 
first ten letters of the alphabet. Next to 
that the last ten. But these are quickly 
guessed. Better than these are words 
(one or more) which have ten letters. All 
that is necessary is to be careful to 
choose a word in which there is no du- 
plicate letters. For instance : 

12345 67890 
BRISK TRADE 
will not do, because 2 and 7 are repre- 
sented by the letter R. Substitute Quick 
for Brisk, and the cost mark will be all 
right. 

1892 was presidential year, and a po- 
litical cost mark was appropriate. Here 
is 

123456789c 
REPUBLICAN 
That's a good one, easily remembered, 
and all right if capitals are used to ex- 
press the cost. If small, or, as printers 
say. " lower case," letters are written, 
there may be some confusion, unless care 
is taken to make a distinction between 
the "e" and "i" and between the "u" 
and "n." 

If your predilections are for the oppos- 
ite party you might use 

1234567890 
DEMOCRATIK 
You will notice that this is spelled with 
a "K." That saves the word, for a re- 
petition of the letter "C" would destroy 
its usefulness for this purpose. 

If you are leaning toward the Prohibi- 
tion party this might suit you : 

123 4567890' 
BAD WHISKEY 
Here are a few words or phrases which 
are used for this purpose. A merchant 
must be very particular if he cannot be 
suited in such a list. You might get a 
Snug Profit or a Cash Profit. If you 
keep a Gainful Job, you must stick to 
the Big Factory. If you are a Big Schol- 
ar you should be an Elucidator of what 
is Profitable. Keep in mind the Import- 
ance of attending to your own business. 
Keep away from the law. Don't be So 



Friendly with the disciples of Blackstone 
as to get upon the wrong side of the Pris- 
on Gate. 

Don't Be Lazy. Bear in mind the Im- 
portance of Industry. My Wife »Toan„ 
who formerly lived in Charleston, but 
whom I married in Cumberland, says : 
" Now Be Sharp. Don't neglect your 
store unless You Are Sick. Don't let your 
Fish Tackle draw you away from your 
business. If you do, you will find that 
your Corn Basket wiill be empty, that 
you cannot even afford Brown Sugar in 
your coffee, and that Cigar Smoke will 
be an unattainable luzury." 

A shoe dealer can easily remember Kip 
Brogans or Tan Blucher. A horseshoer 
can readily recall Blacksmith, and he fre- 
quently shoes a Black Horse. If he is 
a negro he would be a Black Shoer. A 
poker player is familiar with a Big Jack 
Pot, but he cannot use a Faro Bank 
without changing one letter and adding 
one. Wall street operators may remem- 
ber Blue Friday, and Bucketshop pro- 
prietors likewise. 

The question, Can You Swim from 
Perth Amboy to Leavenworth ? con- 
tains three cost marks. The Christian 
Endeavorer may make use of the phrase 
He Is My Rock. 

When it comes to proper_names, one 
can readily be found which will answer 
the requirements. One of the largest dry 
goods stores in the Union uses the name 
James Worin. 

More than one firm uses the name Jane 
Bishop or Bishop Jane. The writer 
knows a David Wilson who uses Wilson 
Dave, and also another whose name, 
John Bagley, is his cost mark. 

Better than any of these, however, is 
a lot of letters which will not spell any- 
thing. Such a cost mark is a little more 
difficult to memorize, but once learned it 
is better, as it lessens the chances of 
guessing or making it out. I have heard 
of Wig Buf Kymp being used for this pur- 
pose. 

Another way is as follows : If an ar- 
ticle cost $3.50 the cost is made by add- 
ing one to each of the numerals, and plac- 
ing 1 each side of it, thus : 

3 5 o 
1 4 6 1 1 
This is quickly legible to the initiated, 
but baffling to the guesser. 

A very good plan is to draw two up- 
right lines, with two across them, thus 
making spaces for the nine numerals, 
thus : 



2 


4 t 6 
. 1 


8 


9 1 


3 


5 -1 7 



The figures can be arranged to suit. 
The symbol that surrounds the figure 
is used to represent that figure. For in- 
stance, a figure like U with square shoul- 
ders would represent 4, and one like L 
would mean 6, the square would stand 
for 9. Either an O or an X could be used 
for the cipher. 

This scheme may be modified by turn- 
ing the figures cornerways, in which 
ing the figures cornerways, in which 
case the hieroglyphics would resemble V 
or A or portions of a diamond. Such a 
list should satisfy the demand of any rea- 
sonable person in need of a cost mark. 
There are thousands of others, but 
enough have been given to show 
what can be used. If there are none 
there which suit the reader, he is invited 
to hunt one up, or make one to suit him- 
self.— Ex. 



OLD STOCK. 

Some stores never have any. Their own- 
ers have found that it pays to keep clear of 
unsaleable or unseasonable goods. There is 
no money to be made in carrying goods from 
one season to another. Just now the columns 
of the daily papers are loaded with announce- 
ments of reductions in the price of winter 
goods. Clearing-out sales are the order of 
the day. The knife goes in regardless of 
cost, and prices are made that will be certain 
to draw purchasers. Fortunately, grocers 
are not so much troubled with goods getting 
out of style, as are dealers in articles of wear 
but many do have more or less stock of un- 
seasonable goods. 

It frequently happens that when certain 
articles are in season and selling briskly, the 
dealer forgets that the demand is limited, 
and so in the full flush of a brisk trade he 
orders largely, to find later that the demand 
has suddenly stopped and he has a liberal 
quantity of merchandise to carry for six 
months or a year. That means a loss unless 
they can be pushed into consumption at a 
reduced price. Look out that a stock of 
domestic dried fruits is not on hand when 
hot weather sets in. Have the canned goods 
well reduced by the time fresh vegetables 
and fruits are generally consumed. Avoid 
an overstock of farinaceous goods in sum- 
mer. Look out that olive oil, sauces, pickles 
and other goods liable to injury from heat 
are not exposed to the direct rays of the sun, 
nor placed on high shelves subjected to a 
high temperature. Unsalable stock is made 
in that way. Avoid selling goods at any 
figure, that are so damaged as to be worth- 
less. For instance, yeast cakes. We recall 
a firm who thought it smart to place a pile 
of stale yeast cakes on the counter, labeled 
at half price. They sold quickly, but there 
went up a hue and cry from their customers, 
of spoiled batches of bread which made 
havoc with their flour trade. 

In placing new purchases in stock see to 
it that they are not put in front of stock on 
hand. It frequently happens that goods on 
the back of a shelf stay there for months and 
become unsaleable, through the custom of 
not bringing the eailier purchase to the front 
and keeping the later goods in the rear. 

A constant supervision of the cellar, the 
storeroom, out-of-the-way shelves, under- 
neath counters and out-of-the-way places is 
imperative if the quantity of unsalable stock 
is to be kept at a low point. Interest adds 
to the cost of slow-selling stock without re- 
morse, as it does to fresh goods. The moral 
is, keep stock fresh and moving. — American 
Grocer. 



The order issued by the Canadian Pacific 
railway some time ago prohibiting passen- 
gers from travelling by freight trains is dis- 
approved by the Winnipeg Board of Trade. 
It is claimed to be a hardship to commercial 
travellers, who are thus compelled often to 
drive from one town to another, and the 
effect on business is already felt by the 
wholesale houses. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TO INCREASE THE SUPPLY OF 
HOPS. 

Hon. Messrs. Bowell and Angers were 
waited upon on Tuesday by a deputa- 
tion representing the pork packing inter- 
ests of Ontario, and consisting of J. W. 
Flavelle, of Toronto ; F. W. Fearman, of 
Hamilton, and C. G-. Wilson, of Ingersoll. 
They represented that the pork packers 
of Canada are not able to obtain a con- 
' tinuous supply of hogs of Canadian 
growth for the purpose of keeping their 
factories running all the year round. In 
fact, this point was recognized by the 
Government "some years ago, and in or- 
der to meet the needs of the pork pack- 
ing interests a concession was made by 
which they were enabled to import hogs 
from the United States in bond and ship 
the pork out of the country on the basis 
of 60 pounds for every 100 pounds live 
weight on hogs up to 200 pounds,, and 
65 pounds on hogs over 200 pounds. 
About six months ago an inspector was 
sent through western Ontario on the re- 
port of the prevalence of hog cholera in 
the United States to see that the quar- 
antine regulations were strictly enforc- 
ed, and object of the deputation to the 
Ministers was to urge some relaxation 
of these regulations in order to enable 
them to keep their establishments run- 
ring during the winter. They promised 
that every care would be taken that 
the animals would be properly handled, 
and be put through their establishments 
with the least possible delay. Both Min- 
isters promised that the request would 
be taken into consideration. 



conveying the crop to this or any other 
market of the world. Going back to the 
visible supply of this class of fruit we 
Would say that the quantity upon spot 
and afloat, so far as the cables have ad- 
vised, includes 14,000 boxes, 10,000 bags 
and 500 casks, the latter including a 
line of 300 carried over from the previous 
season.— N. Y. Commercial Bulletin. 



THE SITUATION IN PRUNES. 

All the indications point to a high 
market for prunes during the remainder 
of the crop year, the stock of all varie- 
ties being small, with primary sources 
advising very limited quantities avail- 
able for market purposes. The year 1892 
goes upon record with very poor crop 
results in all producing countries. Bos- 
nia and Servia, the heavy producing dis- 
tricts of previous years, comes to the 
front with a very small surplus, and 
packers there have elevated their ideas 
to such a point that the former common 
article that was sent out from that sec- 
tion of Europe is now looked upon in the 
light of a comparative luxury. Up to 
about three j r ears ago, the bulk of this 
the Turkish crop, was sent to the mar- 
ket* of the world in the unwieldy casks, 
but since that time the packers of that 
country, stimulated by competition from 
France and California, have used their 
best endeavors to raise the quality of 
their goods in the estimation of consum- 
ers, and in this they have proved very 
successful. In previous years there was 
little or no attention given to the size 
of fruit, the crop being collected and 
packed into casks regardless of quality, 
but assorting the various sizes has now 
been adopted, and in marketing the crop 
purchases and sales are made wholly 
upon this basis. Boxes are found to meet 
with most favor in the trade, and under 
the name of Sultana a very consider- 
able portion of the crop is now packed, 
assorted in sizes running from 60 to 100 
to the pound. Bags are also a popular 
package with many in the trade, but in 
putting the goods up in this way the 
importance of sizes is kept well in mind, 
as upon such depends the value of the 
fruit in the eyes of importers. The 
old method of casks is, in fact, rapidly 
giving place to the smaller and more con- 
venient packages, and in time the former 
will drop out entirely as a means of 



THE MAN IN HIS OWN LIGHT. 

The mission of the trade press and the 
mercantile organizations— what they 
might accomplish— is thwarted by the 
large percentage of men who have drifted 
into business who cannot be brought to 
see advantage of the most advantageous 
plans and lines of united effort. 

There are two classes of men among 
the ranks of this detrimental influence in 
our mercantile circles. One is that piti- 
able class who would do better if they 
knew better, or, in other words, that de- 
plorably ignorant element who are sim- 
ply business machines, continuing in the 
groove in which they were started by 
long superintended practice in a clerk- 
ship, and, consequently, men who have 
not sufficient breadth of intellect to com- 
prehend a progressive idea. Then we 
are cursed with another class who either 
from a purely selfish or a mulish, stub- 
born motive, refuse to be convinced of 
what their better judgment tells them is 
the proper course to pursue. The first 
we pity, but for the second we can only 
have contempt. 

Men are in business for legitimate 
profit, yet many times they throw an 
impassable barrier across the shortest 
route to success by taking the most ab- 
surbly foolish and* boyish views of their 
own work. A hundred little jealousies 
arise to prevent the unity of action which 
should exist. This man is afraid that if 
he should* enter into any compact or 
agreement it might deprive him of his 
personal liberty. While he has no concep- 
tion of the grandeur and sublimity of 
thought, the scope of freedom and en- 
nobling influences contained in the idea 
of a manly man in the enjoyment of per- 
sonal liberty, yet somewhere he has ab- 
sorbed in a spongelike manner, from con- 
tact with others the dimly defined con- 
cept of a curtailed personal liberty, 
whenever he allows himself to agree to 
any proposition which will help others 
as well as himself. Hence it is that we 
find this man blocking the wheels of pro- 
gress to the most plausible plan of enter- 
prising procedure. His neighbor has read 
somewhere that; a monopoly is not quite 
the thing, and, consequently, with the 
heroic flourish of a martyr to the right, 
he refuses to act in accordance with the 
desire of the majority because it might 
appear as a monopoly working against 
the few. So we will find all these char- 
acters doing their little to prevent the 
most desirable outcome to any question 
at issue. 

Men who stand in their own light. 
How well this homely old proverb ex- 
presses the action of many of our pro- 
fessed business men, whom we would nat- 
urally suppose possessed sufficient com- 
mon sense to lead them to change their 
position when they found that their own 
shadow was casting darkness and a 
prophecy of failure along their business 
path, or at least making it more diffi- 
cult to travel. No matter what you 
bring before a body of men you will in- 
variably find these "kickers." Take the 
most simple cases for illustration. Start 
out in your- own city, and work continu- 
ously from now until the middle of next 
summer, when the thermometer stands 
at 100 degrees in the shade, trying to 



get every man in the grocery business 
to see the advisability of and to sign an 
agreement promising to close at a sea- 
sonable hour during the warm weather, 
and just as sure as you make the trial 
in this or any other city, or even in the 
village containing ten merchants, you 
are sure to find the usual percentage of 
"sore heads" who will refuse, upon one 
pretext or other, to agree to the most 
reasonable proposition. 

It is only necessary to pay one visit 
to any mercantile organization in our 
city upon any regular meeting night to 
hear a "holy howl" go up regarding 
poor profits, cutting of prices, etc. This 
discordant yell of dissatisfaction is 
about the most unanimous expression 
you can get out of the assembly. Every 
man agrees that it is an evil that should 
be corrected, but when you come to dis- 
cuss ways and means, and lay plans 
before these same men for their consider- 
ation, plans which would, if adhered to, 
to a large extent obviate the existing 
trouble, it is quite a different thing, and 
the man who stands in his own light, 
and is always present at these meetings, 
is sure to come to the front with his non- 
sensical ideas on liis narrow, contracted, 
selfisb prejudices, and do all in his power 
against the accomplishment of the very 
result he claims to desire. If his influ- 
ence stopped here it would not matter, 
but it does not. Take, for instance, a 
case like this. The members or a mer- 
cantile organization, or, rather, a ma- 
jority of them, agree to fix a certain 
selling price upon some article handled 
by every one of them. This the majority 
thinks the best method of regulating an 
evil which is depriving each of his legi- 
mate profit for handling the goods, 
whereupon Mr. Sorehead rises to state 
that he will not agree to such a propo- 
sition, as it will deprive him of his per- 
sonal liberty. He wants to fix his own 
prices, and is going to do it if he chooses. 
Of course, he wants it understood that he 
is not one of the foolish merchants who 
'cut" the living profits out of business, 
but he wants his liberty, and if he 
wants to sell Mrs. B. one article below 
what he should, in hopes he can sell her 
another at an exorbitant profit to make 
up, he is not going to enter into an 
agreement which will prevent him doing 
so. This is the character who makes ut- 
terly worthless the effort of the others 
to do business on a business basis. He 
sells his articles at the price he desires, 
and while he is doing this his neighbor 
sells the very article he gets a goop 
price for at a cut rate. Now, the result 
is very evident, for in the near future 
Mrs. B. informs her friend, Mrs. A., that 
article number one can be had at a much 
lower price of her merchant, while Mrs.A. 
in return gives the information that she 
knows where she can buy article number 
two for half the money, and our "cutting 
soreheads" reap the harvest. 

The only remedy possible in the case 
is for the wholesaler and manufacturer 
to protect the majority by refusing to 
sell to the few who persist in standing in 
their own light. 

Aside from this, however, the mercan- 
tile organizations have a work to per- 
form. What is the use of organization if 
it counts for nothing in actual results ? 
If a resolution is passed by a majority 
and a minority refuses to be governed 
by it, then the sooner the organization 
respectfully requests the resignation of 
these "sorehead" characters the better. 
Let our business men who profess to be 
united for mutual advancement, act like 
men in the transaction of their business 
and be governed by the voices of the 
greater number.— Merchant Sentinel. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




[This department is made up largely of items 
from travellers and retailers throughout the 
Dominion. It contains much interesting informa- 
tion regarding the movements of those in the 
trade. The editor will thank contributors to 
mail oopy to reach the head office Wednesday.] 



The business men of Sarnia are trying to 
organize a board of trade. 

George M. Wilkinson, one of the oldest 
merchants in Kingston, died last week. 

W. W. Ogilvie has been unanimously 
elected president of the Montreal Board of 
Trade. 

The first lot of lobsters from down the bay 
of Fundy, arrived by schooner in St. John 
from Musquash last week. 

Frank W. Smith, with- the wholesale gro- 
cery firm of Smith & Burton, Brandon, Man., 
is on a visit to his uncle, S. D. Biggar, Ham- 
ilton. 

Fire broke out on Friday morning in 
Thomas Doyle's grocery and liquor stores, 
Halifax It and the contents were totally 
destroyed. 

Old people with impaired digestion are 
exceptionally fond of Burnham's Clam 
Bouillon ; its continued use gives them new 
life and vigor. 

It is understood that large quantities of 
British Columbia canned salmon, the anti- 
cipated pack of '93, have been contracted for 
at good prices. 

D. Weismiller wants to sell his Kippen 
business. His new venture at Hensall has 
grown so rapidly that it gi/es him all he can 
do to manage it. 

B. Tibbetts & Son, of Alymer, have pur- 
chased the grocery business of J. E. Mor- 
rison there, and will take possession at once. 
Mr. Morrison will remove to Brantford. 

The editor of the New England Grocer 
may not have noticed it himself, but it will 
be apt to strike his readers that the N. E. G. 
of the 13th inst. is a specially good number. 

John Curtin, for many years bookkeeper 
in the grocery store of Frank Smith & Co., 
and the London successors of that firm, John 
Garvey & Co., died at his home north of 
Toronto on Friday last. 

If those people who have been obliged to 
discontinue using tea and coffee will take 
Burnham's Clam Bouillon instead, they will 
enjoy it quite as well if not better, and it will 
tone up your stomach in a short time. 

At the annual meeting of the Edwardsburg 
Starch Company, the following board of di- 
rectors was elected : Richard Bolton, War- 
den King, Robert Anderson, Wm, Strachan, 



[George F. Benson, W. E. Cheese and John 
/ Fairbairn. Mr. Richard Bolton was elected 
J president and Mr. Warden King vice-presi- 
dent. 

The Norland mills Norland, Ont. were re- 
duced to ashes last week. The origin of the 
fire is supposed to have been from the chim- 
ney in the top storey of the flour mill. The 
loss on flour mill, about $6,000. 

Robert Millar, merchant and postmaster 
of Millarton, Ont., died the other day after a 
long period of illness. Mr. Millar belonged 
to one of the oldest families in Bruce county, 
and was highly respected by all who knew 
him. 

There appears to be considerable dissatis- 
faction among importers in Winnipeg at the 
tardy manner in which entries are passed 
through the Custom house. There is said to 
be a good deal of friction between the Cus- 
toms clerks. 

A farmer from Elora writes to the Guelph 
press warning farmers to be on the outlook 
for sharpers who are operating in that section 
of the country. They are shoddy cloth ped- 
dlers, and it is said they can fleece the farm- 
ers before their eyes. 

A gang of counterfeit coin-makers are at 
work in the neighborhood of Lancaster, near 
Kingston, and have succeeded in floating a 
good deal of "stuff" around. They are mak- 
ing quarters and half dollar pieces, and it is 
said they have a dollar piece out. 

A fire broke out at Miami, Man., at 2 
o'clock, Jan. 11. Collins & Munro, general 
merchants, building and stock were all de- 
stroyed. This firm carried insurance to the 
amount of $4,500 on building and contents. 
Loss about $3,000 on building, and $6,000 on 
stock. 

The nominations for the Montreal Board 
of Trade officers have been made. The fol- 
lowing were declared elected without oppo- 
sition : — President, Mr. W. W. Ogilvie ; 1st 
vice-president, Mr. J. A. Cantlie ; 2nd vice- 
president, Mr. W. C Munderloh ; treasurer, 
Mr. Edgar Judge. 
/ D. R. Wilkie was unanimously elected 
J President of the Toronto Board of Trade to 
• succeed H. N. Baird. Hugh Blain, of Eby, 
/Blain & Co., was also re-elected first vice- 
-president without opposition. William Ince 
and John I. Davidson are among the nomi- 
nees to the Council. 

A large number of the business men of 
Wingham met A. C. Strathdee, agent of 
the G.T.R.,at the council chamber there the 
other day, and presented him with a kindly 
worded address. Mayor Clegg occupied the 
chair, and the recipient made a neat reply- 
Mr. Strathdee has been removed to Brant- 
ford. 

In the Quebec Legislature last week Mr. 
Auge moved a second reading of his bill re- 
specting the early closing of shops, but just 
as the Speaker was putting the motion to the 
vote, Mr. Martineau rose and moved the six 



months' hoist, seconded by Mr. Kennedy. 
Mr. Martineau was about to speak to his 
motion, when Mr. Auge raised the objection 
already made that his bill was not printed 
in both languages. He therefore asked per- 
mission to withdraw it. Leave was granted 
and the bill withdrawn. 

Price & McKay, general merchants, Este- 
van, Assa, have sold out their stock, plant 
and buildings to Lindsay & Patterson, of 
Stonewall. They found that owing to their 
large ranching business they could not de- 
vote sufficient time to this business, hence 
the sale. 

Charles P. Hebert, of Hudon, Hebert & 
Co., wholesale grocers, Montreal, declined 
the nomination and the certainty of election 
to the first vice-presidency of the Board of 
Trade of his city, owing to his intention of 
being absent the greater part of the current 
year. 

Norwhich, Ont., came close to being wiped 
out by a fire on the 16th inst. Among the 
sufferers were C. Henderson & Co., general 
merchants, who had their plate glass win- 
dows badly damaged. None of the other 
numerous losses belonged to the general store 
or grocery trade. 

The boys who robbed the grocery store of 
Mr. Dunfee in Port Hope are now reaping 
their reward. The older one, Lowe, 17 years 
of age, was sentenced to a year in the Central 
Prison. The other, a boy 15 years of age, 
named Black, gets five years in the Pen- 
etanguishene Reformatory. 

James Rodger, manufacturers' agent, Am- 
herst, N.S., was here this week. He repre- 
sents D. S. Perrin & Co , confectioners, 
London, Can. ; W. A. Bradshaw & Co., 
Ammonia Soap ; Simcoe Canning Co., Sim- 
coe, Ont.; Joseph Burnett & Co., extiacts 
and toilet soaps, Boston ; also Wright 8c 
Copp, Toronto, for the sale of MacLaren's 
Imperial cheese, and the T. A. Snider Pre- 
serve Co.'s soups, catsups, etc. 

The sugar business in the Hawaiian Isl- 
ands is in a bad way, so bad in fact that the 
plantations are beginning to feel the effect 
very sadly. One of the great sugar-growing 




MARMALADE 



New Season's Make now Ready 
for Shipment 



GENERAL AGENTS 

MONTREAL 



Blalklock Bros. 

WRIGHT & COPP, Toronto Agents 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



11 



It is and has been our business to offer during January the best values 
in Teas on the market. Do not allow this month to pass with- 
out writing to us for samples. We willl show you bargains. - 



Lucas, Steele & Bristol 



HAMILTON, ONT.- 



We believe our Teas to be unequalled for flavour, 
strength, and purity. Send us a trial order for a case 
of HILLWATTEE TEA. - 



Every Gpoeep Requires One~( p Ax E NTED 



Counter Tea-Mixer 

71X 



The handiest article ever placed on a counter. 
Made of brass throughout ; will last a lifetime. 
A great time-saver ; a perfect mixing machine. 
Every merchant thoroughly delighted with it. 
A Grocer using it a few days feels lost without it. 



The price of this Mixer is so low and its utility so great no grocer should | 
hesitate to order at once. It is only a question of time before the old 
style of mixing tea by hand is a thing of the past. .... 

Sent by express to any address on receipt of $1.50. Nickel-plated 
50 cents extra. ........ 

Worth ten times its cost to any grocer. .... 

For further information drop us a card for descriptive circular. 



W.H.Gillard&Co. 

HAMILTON 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS : : 




The reputation 
the Manufacturers 



°s! Messrs. Chase & Sanborn 

Is a guarantee of the excellence of their 



S 



A skilfully 
blended 



eal Brand 
Condensed Coffee, c 2n™ 

PRICES AND SAMPLES ON APPLICATION TO 



Pure Coffee, 
Cream and Sugar 



James Turner &» Go., 

HAMILTON, ONT 



<( 



MONSOON" 



PURE INDIAN TEA. Always relia 
ble, never changes. In cases of 60 
1 -lb. caddies, or 120 halves. 



WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED NUMEROUS LINES OF INDIAN AND CEYLON TEAS, 

IN CHESTS AND HALF CHESTS. 

STAZLsTIDAIRID BLZEISHDIEID TEAS. 

OUR BLENDING DEPARTMENT IS NOW OPEN, UNIFORMITY CAN BE RELIED ON. WE HAVE THE 
FIRST CHOICE OF THE MARKET AND THE BEST ESTATES AT OUR DISPOSAL, AND GUARANTEE EXCEL- 
LENT VALUE. WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 



STEEL, HAYTER&CO. 



11 AND 13 FRONT ST. EAST 



Growers' and Importers, Toronto, 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



firms, the Hawaiian Commercial Company, 
some time ago found it necessary to levy an 
assessment ot $5 per share, where in former 
years it had paid dividends. A very large 
number of the shareholders have refused to 
pay this assessment and a movement is ap- 
parently on foot to resist its imposition. 

An old mercantile house of St. John's, 
Nfld., H. & L. Tessiers, have assigned, with 
liabilities stated at about $800,000. Their 
London agents will be the heaviest losers. 
The Newfoundland creditors, it is said, will 
not be seriously embarrassedby their losses. 
Speculations in the fish tr*de are given as 
causes of the heavy losses. The house has 
been in existence upwards of 50 years. 

Mr. Devitt, grocer, Berlin, Ont., has dis- 
covered how he was losing money. A boy 
was the culprit. He would go the grocery 
store every day while either the proprietor 
or the clerk was alone in the store and ask 
for coal oil. As no oil was kept in the store 
the person who was in charge would go over 
to a hardware store next door to get the oil. 
Being left alone in the store the boy would 
have full access to the till, and he never lost 
an opportunity. Mr. Devitt thinks he stole 
at least $50. 

Discussing the proposal to pass a Domin- 
ion insolvency law, the St. John Telegraph 
remarks that by it Toronto and Montreal 
wholesalers and manufacturers hope to be 
placed in a more favorable position with re- 
spect to maritime debtors than they now are. 
This, says the Montreal Gazette, about des- 
cribes the situation. The western whole- 
salers hope, by an insolvency law, to secure 
the same share of a maritime insolvent's as- 
sets, when he owes them money, as his local 
creditors obtain. They do not ask any more, 
and they ask this because as the law now is 
they very rarely can obtain it. 

Dawson & Co., wholesale fruit merchants, 
of this city, held an auction sale of fruits on 
Tuesday last, comprising lots of oranges, 
lemons, and Spanish onions. The oranges 
were large sizes, some being wasty stock and 
therefore not of the value of good smaller 
sizes. They sold chiefly to the wholesale 
trade and brought from $1.85 to $2.85. 
There were fifty boxes of lemons on the cata- 
logue for sale, and two small lots brought $3 
to $305 respectively. The remainder was 
withdrawn because of the sales being below 
value. One lot of Spanish onions, 5 boxes, 
brought 55c. ; the next was withdrawn on 
account of sale being below value. 

The Grocer acknowledges with best 
thanks the receipt of a very handsome 
pocket memorandum book in maroon-color- 
ed, pebbled leather binding, bearing on the 
cover-flap the impress of the Pure Gold 
Manufacturing Co., of this city, whose com- 
pliments accompany the gift. Merchants 
who are favored with this memento of plea- 
sant business intercourse will find it as much 
designed for service as for show. It is a 
compact little book, its fine, liberal-sized 



pages lying closely together and affording 
store-room for a good budget of notes. The 
paper is so firm that the friction of page 
surfaces will not easily efface entries. A 
pencil is attached. 

Owing, doubtless, to the abolition of the 
sugar duties, the importation of this commo- 
dity in its various forms shows a large in- 
crease compared with 1890, the last complete 
year in which the duties were in force. The 
comparative figures are : 

Lbs. Value. 

1890 189,282,237 $5,580,574 

1892 258,642,211 6,913,553 

During the year 9,929,616 pounds of to- 
bacco, snuff and cigarettes were manufac- 
tured in Canada, about the same quantity as 
in i89i;and 107,927,813 cigars were manu- 
factured, an increase of 7,000,000. The fol- 
lowing table shows the annual consumption, 
per head of population : 

Year. Tobacco. 

1889 2,153 lbs. 

1890 2,143 lbs - 

1891 2,292 lbs. 

1892 2,291 lbs. 

The Halifax Retail Grocers' association 
held a meeting the other night, which was 
largely attended. They decided to have 
their aleigh drive (sleighing permitting,) on 
Monday, the 23rd inst., starting from their 
rooms at St. Mary's hall, at 7 o'clock, sharp. 
The committee having the matter in charge 
are Edward Fenton, J. J. Skerry, Jas. A. 
Gass, E. R. Wright, Andrew Hubley and W. 
E. Crowe. An enjoyable time was put 
in. This committee had charge of the 
first annual drive and they made it an un- 
qualified success. 

Speaking recently with a grocer about the 
evils of the trade, etc., he remarked that 
customers' dogs were about the biggest nuis- 
ance he had to contend with. Said he : "I 
lost two customers last week because I would 
not allow their pet dogs to do just as they 
pleased in my store ; I kicked them out, and 
out walked the customers." Hereaftei he 
will have a plaster of paris dog on his coun- 
ter labelled, "This is the only dog allowed 
in the store." Some of the grocers would do 
well to keep their own cats and dogs out of 
the store. Dogs in grocery stores can be 
dispensed with. — National Grocer. 

It will be remembered that last November 
it was cabled from England that a family in 
Bradford had been poisoned by eating can- 
ned Canadian lobsters. Hon. Mr. Tupper, 
anxious for the credit of the Canadian pack, 
requested the High Commissioner to investi- 
gate the case. Sir Charles Tupper has done 
this, and has now reported that the tin of 
lobsters which caused the trouble was of the 
Star brand, packed by D. M. Loggie, of 
Chatham, N.B. It was found that theie was 
nothing whatever the matter with the solder 
or other material used in the can, and there 
was no arsenical poisoning. The fact of the 
matter was that the lobsters were putrid and 
should not have been used as food at all. The 



can had in some manner become punctured 
and air had been admitted, which, of course, 
spoiled the fish and it should not have been 
used. No blame at all appears to attach to 
the packer. 

A fire broke out in Caledonia, Ont., on the 
19th inst. Hull & Old, flour dealers, lost 
their stock, which was barely covered by 
$1,000 of insurance. 

G. J. Troop has been elected president, 
and James Morrow and Michael Dwyer, first 
and second vice presidents respectively of 
the Halifax Board of Trade. 

Thos. Campbell, of the old established firm 
of Campbell, McNeil & Co., Keene, Ont., 
died suddenly at his residence on Monday, 
after a short illness, aged 67 years. Death 
was due to heart failure. 

The Sydenham Valley Canning Company's 
factory, owned by Skinner, Ay res & Co., of 
Wallaceburg, was destroyed by fire on Mon- 
day morning. Loss $13,000, insured for $9,- 
000. Cause of fire unknown. 

The Western Milling Co., of Regina, N. 
W. T., favors The Grocer with two very 
handsome office hangers. In one, the picture 
is "Sweet Violets" in the other it is "We'd 
Better Bide A Wee. " There is no danger of 
these pictures being put on one side. There 
is sure to be a rush for them as soon as the 
company begin to distribute, for they are 
certainly fine shop ornaments. 

We regret to record the death of William 
Isaac Palmer, one of the founders of the cel- 
ebrated biscuit firm, which occured on the 
8th inst. at Reading, England, from periton- 
itis after an illness ot only a few days. Mr. 
Palmer, who was in his sixty-ninth year, was 
a member of the Society of Friends and a 
generous supporter of temperance and phil- 
anthropic movements. 

Co-operative stores have been found from 
police court prosecutions, to be as guilty of 
illegality as private traders, and though dur- 
ing the year, allegations have been made by 
interested persons that such concerns were 
more honest and showed better value than 
those of the legitimate shopkeeper, facts 
have proved distinctly to the contrary. Dur- 
ing the year, the public have also had plenty 
of illustrations of the unsound commercial 
methods of these stores. Several of them 
have gone into liquidation, owing to the dis- 
honesty of officials and the lack of public 
support, whilst the exposure of the high 
prices charged by the stores, as compared 
with those of the private trader, have no 
doubt told in favor of the latter. Some of 
the limited liability concerns that have as- 
sumed the title of co-operative stores, have 
also during the year collapsed, bringing dis- 
astrous results to shareholders, although en- 
riching that commercial vampire — theswind- 
lmg promoter. — Manchester Grocers' Re- 



Competition is keen and active and the only 
way to meet it successfully is to bay from the. 
h«(t bouses, and at lowest prices. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



\IiE]V[O^S 



We have in store a consignment 
of Florida Oranges and Messina 
Lemons, all sizes — which we are 
offering at low prices. 

— Write for quotations. 



H. P. ECKARDT & CO. Wholesale Grocers Toronto 



FOOD 

FOR 

BABIES 



EVAPORATED CREAM 



STEEILIZED. 

Pronounced by Physicians to be 



FROM 

DISEASE GERMS 

DELAFIELD, IWCOVERN & CO., 

91 Hudson St., Sole Agents. 

NEW YORK. 

33 River Street, 

CHICAGO. 

215 California St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

For sale in Canada by 

AMES TURNER & CO 

Hamilton, Ont. 



HUDON, HEBERT <£ CIE., 



Wholesale Grocers 

AND 

Wine Importers, 



304, 306 St. Paul St., 

143, 145 Commissioners St. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 



Now in stock and ready to quote 

2000 boxes Sultana Raisins. 

200 barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

200 half barrels FINE PROVINCIAL Currants. 

New Nuts of all kinds. 

Fine Off Stalk Valencia Raisins, different brands. 

A few boxes NEW MALAGA Fruit left. 



L. CHAPUT, FILS & CIE. 



Wholesale Grocers, Montreal 



Import ant C orrection. 

Inadvertantly we stated in our large advertisement last week, 
and it was not noticed in time for this week, that we had bought the 
stock and good-will of Messrs Tees, Wilson & Co. Our advertise- 
ment should have read : — Having bought the grocery stock of 
Messrs. Tees, Wilson & Co., we are offering Special Values during 
the next two weeks. 

CAVERHILL, ROSE, HUGHES & CO., 

. . MONTREAL . . 



2000 PAILS 

2 and 3 gal 8. 



Pare Sugar Syrup 



H 





M 



REGAN, WHITE k CO. 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING. 

One of the best things in any store is 
order. If everything is out of order It 
will be hard to find what is wanted when 
the dealer comes to look for it. He may 
look as he will, but in a disordered store 
he will have a hard time to lay his hands 
on the article sought after. 

This is particularly true in the case 
of articles for which there Is not much 
call. They have been put away be- 
cause they are not in active demand 
and they are put away so effectively 
that the dealer can't find them— especial- 
ly if he is looking for them. If he does 
not look for them they will probably be 
bobbing up all the time. 

It Is a very good idea to be methodical 
in all things pertaining to store manage- 
ment. By this it is not meant that ( a 
dealer should get into a rut and never 
get out, but that all things should be 
kept in even running order. Every 
piece of machinery should work in unison 
with every other piece, so that the whole 
mechanism is perfect. 

Have " a place for everything and 
everything in its place," and then there 
will be little friction. Fix in the mind the 
places in which certain articles are kept, 
so that you can remember whether in the 
store or not. If this rule be always ob- 
served, there will be no hunting at ran- 
dom all over the store to find what a 
customer calls for. 

However, very few dealers are so care- 
less about the management of the goods 
on the shelves and in the show cases 
where they can find them readily as they 
are about keeping their papers in order. 
There is perhaps nothing that is more 
important and nothing that is so much 
neglected. 

First, in regard to business letters. A 
small country merchant may not get a 
great many letters, and for that reason 
he thinks there is no use in being sys- 
tematic about keeping them in order. 
Maybe he carries them about in his pock- 
et until that gets full, and then he puts 
them on his desk or table without filing 
them at all. The letters may not seem 
of special importance at the time, but 
they may prove very important at some 
future time. 

After a letter has been carelessly 
thrown aside it is very easy to have it 
lost. It may be brushed off the table ac- 
cidentally or it may be blown off by a 




TO YOU it is 

PROFITABLE and a 

QUICK SELLER. 

Thousands testily to its PURITY and 

Wonderful washing qualities in 

HARD or SOFT WATER. 



gust of wind. It is then swept up with 
the refuse paper and that is the last of 
it. It may be very important for refer- 
ence, but that does not bring it back 
again. 

If a merchant does not have enough 
correspondence to need a file— which is 
improbable— he should at least have a 
box, or a receptacle of some sort to put 
all his letters in. Then if anything comes 
up in which the letters may be of use 
they are easily referred to. They should 
be just as carefully kept as notes and 
receipts. 

And letters are not the only articles 
that should be filed and kept track of. 
There are circulars of some sort coming 
every day. Now, I feel sure that half or 
two-thirds of these find a resting place 
in the waste basket. This may be all 
right in a great many cases, but there 
are cases where the circulars should be 
preserved. If they relate to anything 
handled by the merchant or anything 
pertaining to his line of goods they 
ought to be kept, in case he should want 
to refer to them again. He may not want 
anything described in the circular at the 
time it comes, but after it is gone be- 
yond his reach he may have use for it, 
and will not remember the address so 
that he can get another. If it is preserv- 
ed the merchant may find it very useful 
at some future time. 

Then there is another class of mail 
which ought to be cared for even more 
carefully.and that is the catalogues that 
come from manufacturers and Jobbers. 
They are prepared and published at 
great expense and are expected to give 
information which will save a great deal 
of correspondence. 

It is a good plan to make a place for 
these catalogues and price lists on some 
shelf where they will be easy of access 
and still not be in the way. Some of 
these lists are very valuable and give in- 
formation not obtainable elsewhere, so 
that their loss would be a source of re- 
gret. " Oh, well," some may say, " if I 
lose this I'll send and get another when 
I want it.' Yes ; that is all right, but it 
is sometimes easier said than done. I've 
had a little experience in that line my- 
self and I have been disappointed a few 
times, in not being able to get another 
catalogue when I wanted it, and wanted 
it badly, too. 

I think that we dealers are too apt to 
think that the wholesalers and jobbers 
exist solely for our convenience, and we 
smetimes take too many liberties. We 
must remember that they have greater 
risks and more capital at stake than we 
have, and their interests ought to be re- 
spected once in a while. So all dealers 
ought to take care of lists of goods 
which are sent to them, and when they 
want to ask questions about articles 
handled or want some information about 
ordering, terms, or whatnot, let them 
go to the catalogue, and ten to one they 
will find what they wanted printed there- 
in.— Ex. 



TRY IT. 



ROYAL SOAP CO., 

Winnipeg, Man. 



MEND YOUR WAYS. 

Some business men spend so much time 
in growling over the trade situation and 
outlook that opportunities continually 
slip by them. If they would hustle more 
and talk less, the causes of their com- 
plaints would soon disappear.— Mer- 
chant's Review. 

The advice contained in the above 
paragraph is applicable to a host of 
men in every section. The biggest growl- 
ers always inhabit the most demoral- 
ized establishments. Their stock is in 
poor shape, methods slovenly, business 
habits destructive. They are never 



prompt, never take account of stock, and, 
in all human probability, never advertise. 

One way to win custom and sell goods, 
is to keep— always keep one's merchan- 
dise in a neat, clean and saleable con* 
dition. A stock so kept recommends it- 
self. 

Another way, an auxiliary to the first, 
is to receive one's customers with ready 
smiles Instead of frowns, and show them 
one's goods confidently, anticipating a 
sale, as it were. Cheerful good nature, 
backed by a well-conditioned stock and 
a known reputation for enterprise and 
fair-dealing, keep the brow furrowless 
and relegate " hard times" to the inde- 
finite backwoods. Many a man's down- 
fall is due to slovenly business habits. 
The world loves indications of pros- 
perity. No matter how dull the times 
or slack the trade, keep the stock in 
shape and whistle for fairer winds.— 
Commercial Tribune. 



POINTS FOR CLERKS. 

" It would be well for the young men 
of to-day to take my recipe for becoming 
prosperous," said a Boston merchant. 
" I began life at the very bottom rung of 
the ladder, but with a determination 
that I would succeed if such a thing 
were possible with the talent that I pos- 
sessed. Early in life I came to the con- 
clusion that economy was the first great 
essential in establishing a fortune, and 
that labor was the second. I banished 
from my mind all other considerations 
when I began to work upon the road 
that I felt sure would lead to the goal 
of which I was in search. I remember 
very distinctly going down Marshall 
street one day and having my attention 
attracted by a most tempting display in 
a confectioner's window. I had what is 
known as a very sweet tooth, and I 
brought up standing before the sweet 
collection as if suddenly arrested by 
some irresistible force. My hand immedi- 
ately fouud its way to the pocket that 
carried my meagre hoardings, and, be- 
fore I really knew what I was doing, I 
had invested two cents in butterscotch. 
When I got back into the street I be- 
gan to have a full realization of what 
I had done, and it is safe to say that no 
candy ever entered a boy's mouth that 
was so little relished as was my butter- 
scotch. I regretted that investment for 
years, and whenever the temptation 
again came upon me while passing the 
store, I put it away instantly. Keeping 
on with this line of strict economy, I 
found myself at last in a position to go 
into business. Then, however, I com- 
menced to feel that capital alone was 
powerless in the attainment of success, 
unless it was seconded by untiring labor. 
Here also I met all the necessary re- 
quirements, frequently devoting twenty 
hours of the twenty -four to my business. 
Gradually I found that I was amassing 
a fortune, and finally I established the 
house which now bears my name. After 
I had accomplished what I started out 
to do, there came over me an entire 
change. I had no aspirations to become 
abnormally wealthy. All that I wanted 
was a safe guarantee against possible 
disaster in the future. I devoted a por- 
tion of my time to the enjoyment of life, 
believing that I had earned my right to 
do so. No, sir ; there is no use in filling 
a boy's head with all the new fangled 
ideas of getting rich, as they are not 
practical. Economy and labor are the 
only elements that enter into the great 
plan of successful business life." 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 



J. F. EBY. 




HUCH BLAIN. 



Cocoa, or Cacas, is the kernel of a fruit which furn- 
ishes a most nourishing and invigorating beverage, 
called by the great botanist Linnreus, " Thtobrema" or 
"Food for the Gods." The use of Cocoa is not followed 
by any of the detrimental effects caused by tho excessive 
use of coffee or tea, viz. : irration of the nervous system 
sleeplessness, weakening of the stomach, etc. To make 
Cocoa, in every way satisfactory, so that it may be 
recommended as a nourishing and strengthening 
beverage even to delicate people, it is of the greatest 
importance, indeed a principal requirement, that it 
should be prepared on scientific principles, in order to 
retain the Theobromint or Volatile Oil. 



Bensdorp's 
" Royal 
Dutch " 



has all the good 
attributes and . 
none of the bad 
It is also the . . 
most economical 
in the market. . 



E BY > B LA|N & C°- 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Toronto, Ont. 



Gentlemen: 

At close of stock-taking we 
find our stock of goods 
much larger than ever be- 
fore, and all wall bought. 

OUR BOYS ARE OUT AGAIN; 

Gladen their hearts with 
ijtt the biggest order you can 
^* and it will have our 

PROMPT ATTENTION. 



are now being made to introduce these 
wines into the British Isles. A small 
parcel has just been landed by the steam- 
ship Vancouver at Liverpool, and It in- 
cludes a light kind of Burgundy used 
for sacramental purposes. It is expect- 
ed that the results of this venture will be 
as favorable as those which have at- 
tended the introduction 01 Canadian rye 
and other whiskies, the shipments of 
which are annually assuming greater 
proportions.— Grocers' Chronicle. 



features of some cheese from that prov- 
ince. These defects could all be remedied 
in one season by a little more care about 
taste. The French race have the reputa- 
tion of putting up goods of all sorts In 
the daintiest and most attractive form. 
The French dairymen of Quebec should 
try to maintain the good name of their 
people in that regard. The fact that it 
would pay thein handsomely to do so 
should not be a deterrent." 



THE - 
SNOW 
DRIFT 
CO. 



BRANTFORD- 



CANADIAN WINES FOR ENGLAND. 

Few people are at/are that the cultiva- 
tion of vines for wine-making is prose- 
cuted to a considerable extent in the Do- 
minion of Canada, principally in south- 
west Ontario and on the shores of Lake 
Erie. The growing of the vine and the 
making of the wine are systematically 
carried on by French viticulturists by 
French methods and processes. The Bur- 
gundies, Clarets, and Catawba wines, 
grown on Pelee Island, are well and fav- 
orably known in Canada, and have been 
extensively introduced into the West In- 
dies and other parts. Vigorous efforts 



BUTTER PACKAGES. 

Speaking of the preferences of the Brit- 
ish markets in the matter of butter and 
butter and butter packages, and of cheese 
and cheese boxes, Mr. Robertson said : 
" The demand in different centres of large 
population calls for different qualities in 
color, body and flavor. All the markets 
want a butter with the bloom of fresh 
made flavor still on it. We need refriger- 
ator accommodation on the steamship 
lines from Canada. The Manchester and 
Glasgow markets want a rather pale 
colored butter. The London and Glasgow 
markets are running on square packages, 
after the New Zealand and Australian 
style. We will have some of our winter- 
made creamery butter from the Govern- 
ment experimental dairy stations pack- 
ed in square packages this year. I found 
Canadian cheese still growing in favor 
with wholesale dealers and retailers. In 
Manchester district the fat cheese from 
Quebec has not met with particular fav- 
or, and the poor quality of the boxes in 
which the French cheese is shipped has 
caused many complaints. The unwork- 
manlike finish or want of finish, and the 
(wretchedly bad boxes were the worst 



The business men of Sarnia are trying 
to organize a Board of Trade in town. 
They have called a meeting of the busi- 
ness men which it is hoped will turn out 
in their favor. 

Clinton offers a good opening to any 
who would like to commence a pork 
packing industry. The town is the cen- 
tre of a fine agricultural district where 
hogs are plentiful, shipping and banking 
facilities are good. 

A well-known Clintonian, who occupies 
the position of freight conductor on an 
American road, writes to the New Era, 
of Clinton, as follows : " By the way, 
one night, not long ago, I picked up a 
car of flour at Staunton, 111., a small 
mining town about 38 miles east of St. 
Louis, for a large biscuit firm in Toron- 
to, Ont. Now, I have always been jof 
the opinion that there was no better 
flour made than in Ontario. How is it 
that this firm buy flour (and of course 
have to pay the duty on it) in the United 
States. The mill where the flour was 
made is about the size of the Clinton 
flour mill and do a local business, that 
is, buy only local wheat, same as the 
Clinton mill. I would like to be enlight- 
ened on the subject, and it may also 
prove of interest to some other readers 
of your paper. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 





BUYING 



Is the 



Secret of- - 
- - Success 

We can give you 
satisfaction. . . 



Our brands are - 
the finest in - — 
Canada. - - - - 



Empire 

Tobacco 

Co. 




DRY GOODS. 

(From the Dry Goods Review.) 

English advices show another advance 
of l-8d. per yard in colored cottons. 

Wholesalers are ordering their heavy 
woollen underwear for fall delivery over 
a month earlier than usual to try to 
save the advance which is taking place 
in these goods, and which gives signs of 
increasing. Heavy orders have already 
been placed with the mills, and some 
mills are refusing orders at present 
prices, hoping to get a better price later 
on. 

Shot silks are in active demand, both 
for dress trimmings and for evening 
wear. 

The past ten days has seen a large 
number of repeat orders executed for 
heavy underwear, blankets, top shirts, 
and flannels. This is the effect of the pro- 
longed cold weather which we have been 
experiencing. 

NOTES. 

Caldecott, Burton & Spence are show- 
ing a nice range of colors in shot faille 
silks. These are scarce goods at present, 
the shot effect being in great favor in 
nearly all classes of silk goods. 

Fred. Freeman, who looks after the 
local and nearby trade for Gordon, Mac- 
kay & Co., reports the present trip the 
most trying in his experience. Driving 
with the mercury at 20 below scarcely 
comes under the head of pastime. 

John Macdonald & Co. have opened up 
a shipment of two special lines in towel- 
ling to retail at 5 cents, and also two 
special numbers in tablings of extra 
value. They are just opening up case lots 
of embroideries, which are all job lines, 
and at specially low prices. A shipment 
of black surah silk is to hand ; these are 
22-inch goods at a job price ; also coin- 
spot Scotch muslins, in 30 and 36-inch, 
and with all sized spots from that of a 
five cent piece to that of a half-dollar. 
Another line is printed wool delaines, 30- 
inch goods, in spots and figures, dark 
and light grounds. 

W. R. Brock & Co. are shipping out 
their tweeds on spring delivery. They 
report a strong run on a brown and 
bluish mixture, which is so prominent in 
domestic tweeds this season. Lighter 
colors seem to be discarded, except in 
very cheap lines. In Scotch tweeds the 
hop-sack patterns and plain twills are 
having the best demand. They carry a 
nice range of each of these. Light colors 
are not so much in favor as last spring, 
medium shades being preferred by the 
tailors at least. In dress .goods they are 
receiving numerous shipments of Can- 
adian, English.French and German. The 
samples of these have been shown for 
some time and they commence at once 
to fill the numerous orders that have 
been booked. 

Gordon, Mackay & Co. are paying spec- 
ial attention to their men's furnishing de- 
partment. Spring neck wear is now 
spread for inspection, and a more sump- 
tuous display it would be difficult to 
imagine. A leading feature is their $2.25 
range which they claim is unequalled in 
the trade. This is the time of year that 
dry goods merchants aim at clearing 
out or at least reducing stocks of winter 
goods, but they have just purchased and 
passed into stock 2,000 pairs all wool 
blankets, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 pounds. Did 
the price tempt them or should we look 
for a protracted winter ? They have re- 
ceived an enormous shipment of black 
cashmere, but they say they are ship- 
ping these goods every day in the year 



and find difficulty in keeping their stock 
ahead of their orders. They call special 
attention to their No. 175 at 50 cents, 
185 at 52 1-2 cents, and 195 at 55 cents. 
It is not price, but quality and finish' 
that tell the tale. 



A man who went fishing with President- 
elect Cleveland and Joe Jefferson tells this 
story that illustrates a trait in Grover's char- 
acter that some of us would do well to imitate 
at times : Joe Jefferson got restless before we 
had been out half an hour ; he kept wanting 
to move around — was sure that it was "better 
fishing on the other side of the pond." It 
worried Cleveland a good deal, and by and 
by, said he : "Joe, when I was a small boy 
I went fishing with my Uncle Elihu, and I 
remember that he told me that one of the 
secrets of success in life was to stick to the 
place where you'd thrown your anchor out. 
' Too many folks,' said Uncle Elihu, ' spend 
all their time pulling up anchors and rowing 
around ; they don't catch the fish.'* As for 
me," says Cleveland, "when I start in to fish, 
I set right there and fish, until either the pond 
runs dry or the horn blows for supper!' " 

The Montreal Early Closing Association 
held a special meeting the other afternoon 
to put the last touch to the organization of 
the movement in favor of the bill for the 
early c'osing of all stores, presented by Mr. 
Auge at the last session of the Legislature. 
Mr. C. Fournier presided. He made a few 
brief remarks, in which he said that the 
movement in favor of early closing was op- 
posed on the ground that it was an infringe- 
ment of personal liberty. The liberty claim- 
ed by their opponents, however, was only 
the liberty to tyrannize over their employes. 
L. J. Dzois, A. Rouleau and O. Legendre 
were appointed a delegation to go to Quebec 
to urge the passage of the bill. Copies of 
resolutions adopted by several organizations 
have been printed and will be sent to all the 
members of the Legislature. The meeting 
was largely attended. Subscription lists to 
help the cause will be circulated. 



A customer secured is a promise of greater sal- 
ary in time. 

If you want books, it is rarely wise to pay 
double price (or them to a travelling book-seller 

The neglect to look after minute details in the 
factory is a source of great loss to many pro- 
ducers. 



MOST PERFECT MADE. 

It contains neither Ammonia, Alum, or 
any other injurious ingredients. 

It is the lightest and fluffiest of all pow- 
ders. 

DBPRICE'S 

OiMen 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



John Jamieson & Co's 
LOCHFYNE 

HERRINGS 

56-60 E. Howard Street, GLASGOW. 

Agent, W. S. KENNEDY, 

463 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 

^ DAIRY . ' 

BUTTER 

^ DRESSED . ' 

Write or Wire £ UUL1 KY 

ARSONS . . 

RODUCE CO. 



p 



WINNIPEG 



MANITOBA 



W. F. BUCHANAN, 

BROKER, COMMISSION MERCHANT 

AND 

GENERAL PURCHASING AGENT, 

WINNIPEG. 

REPRESENTING: 

ARMOUR & Co., Chicago, 111. 

THE ARMOUR PACKING CO., Kansas City, Mo. 

THE S. C. SUGAR REFINING CO., Ltd., Van- 
couver, B. C. 

BUCHANAN & CO., Saltcoats, N. W. T. 

HIRAM WALKER <fc SONS, Ltd., Walkerville, 
Ont. 

JOHN DEWAR & SONS, Tullymet Distillery, 
Perth, N. B. 

PERINET ET PILS, Reims. 

Warehouses on C. P. R. Track. 

Excise, Customs and Free, 

and Low Rates Storage. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

N OTIOE. 

The British Columbia Fruit Canning and 
Coffee Co'j, Lt'd. 

VANCOUVER. B.C. 

Having largely increased their capacity. We ad- 
vise all dealers to see their price list before plac- 
ing their ordeis for Jams, Jellies, Canned Fruits, 
and Canned Vegetables. 

Besides their regular brands of Ground Coffee, 
now so favorably Known, they quote ; 
Blend No. 1 at 35c, either ground or whole roasted 
" 2 at 33c., " " 
" 3 at 30c., " " " 
Their Flavoring Extracts are of the choicest 
quality. 

EPPS'S GOGOA 

H lb. packets, 14 lb. boxes secured in tin 
Special Agent for the Dominion; 

'C. E. Colson, Montreal 



LAURENCE GIBB 

Provision Merchant, 

83 COLBORNE STREET, - TORONTO 

All kinds of Hog Products handled. Also Butter 
Cheese, Poultry, Tallow, Etc. 

PATENT EGG CARRIERS SUPPLIED. 
Good Prices paid for Good Dairy Butter. 

Meglaughiin, Marshall & Co,, 

Wholesale Provision Merchants, 
3 and 4 Corn Exchange, 

Manchester, 

Also at ' 

Liverpool and Glasgow. p nQ*l3 nfl 

Are prepared to receive Consignments of Eggs, 
Bacon, Hams, etc. Having been established more 
than 40 years, they are in connection with all the 
best buyers in the North of England. 

W. GIBBINS &, CO., 

Commission and 

Manufacturers' Agent, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



We are open for Consignments of Dried 
and Evaporated Apples, Beans, Peas, &c, 
or will take orders for packers and others. 

JAS. DICKSON & CO., 

26 WEST MARKET STREET, 
Provision and Commission Merchant?. 

Eggs, Butter, Hams, Lard, Bacon, Cheese, Dried 
Apples, Finnan Haddies, Dried Cod Fish, bought 
or sold on commission. Agents for all lines of 
Canned Corned Beef. Egg Carriers supplied. 

Butter a little easier, though really no de- 
cline. We quote 18 to 22c. for good to 
choice Eggs are firm at 22 to 25c. for fresh 
and 19 to 20c. for good limed. Potatoes are 
scarce at 90c. to $1. Beans, $1.20 to $1.40. 
Dried apples in demand at 5 to S'/ic. Green 
apples 50c. to $2.00. 

Consignments of above Solicited 

J. F. Young & Co. 

Produce Commissions, 

tJ^SSit 74 Front St East 

. . TORONTO . . 

PARK. BLACKWELL & CO. 



(Limited.) 



— SUCCESSORS TO - 

oT^-S. :p.a.:r:k: & soisr 

TOEONTO. 

Full lines of Superior Cured Hams, Break- 
fast Bacon, New Special Rolls, 
Beef Hams, Long Clear Bacon, 
Butter, Cheese, Lard, Eggs, 
Etc. 
Write for Price List. 



PUT 

TEXAS BALSAM 

I3ST STOCK 

The Qreat Hea'er for all kinds of wounds on 
Horses and Cattle. $3.00 worth only costs you 
$1.80. Express prepaid. Cash with order. 
C. F. SE'JSWORTH, 
6 Wellington St. East, 
Sample 25c. postpaid. Toronto. 

S. K. MOYER, 

Commission Merchant 

And dealer in foreign and 

domestic fruits, fish, 

poultry, etc. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Oysters, Oyster Carriers, 
Smoked, Salt and Fresh 
Fish. Consignments and 
Orders solicited. 

76 Colborne St., 

Toronto, Ont. 

Geokge Mo William. Fbank Everist. 

MGWlLUAM & EVERIST 

Fruit and Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 

TORONTO, ONT. 




FIGS, DATES, NUTS, 

ALMERIA GRAPES, Etc, 

Florida Oranges are now arriving in car lots, 
stock fine, also Messina Lemons. Will fill 
all orders at lowest possible price. 

J. Cleghorn & Son, 

94 Yonge St., TORONTO. 
Fancy Florida Oranges — 

Car arriving weekly. 

Car Messina Lemons — 

Just arrived. 



We are handling best brands Bulk and Cannec 
Oysters, Haddies— Portland and St. Johns, 
Fancy Bloaters and all kinds Fresh Fish, New 
Golden Dates, Figs, Nuts, etc. 



WILLIAM RYAN, 

PORK PACKER 

Toronto, Ont. 

HAMS, MESS PORK, 

BREAKFAST BACON, SHORT GUT, 

ROLLS, LARD. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



McLAREN'S 



Is Honest Goods and just 

the Thing on Which to 

make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, and as prices are modified by both 
quantity and quality, the quotations given below 
and ino'ur Prices Current necessarily take a wide 
range.] 

TORONTO MARKETS. 

Toronto, fan. 26, 1893. 

GROCERIES. 

Trade is quiet. In sugar there is some 
activity, but the movement is probably not 
above what will become the average for this 
time of year under the conditions created by 
the free admission of raw. Until we have a 
periodof several yearsof free raw to look back 
over,itwill behardto say how much an expan- 
sion in the demand may be regular or due to 
some exciting circumstance. Of course there 
is much more sugar sold than what would 
be deemed an average quantity two years 
ago. Tea is moving into current interest, 
and the price is going farther upward. 
Canned" goods are in more active request, 
and holders of stock are in a more cheerful 
frame of mind. Dried fruits are quiet and 
unchanged. The stock of Valencia raisins 
is kept down to limits necessary for current 
business, and current business is small. 
Syrups are quiet, but are expected to come 
into practical trade in a few weeks. Coffees 
lose none of their firmness, stocks are light 
on spot, and all held here were bought since 
the market began its upward course. Pay- 
ments are not an object of much comment. 
They are probably as deserving of a good 
report as of a bad one. The reports vary, 
according as the run of accounts is held 
against good or bad payers. 

COFFEE. 

The report of the market for Brazil coffees 
is like an oft-told tale, it is tediously same. 
The primary market is strong, and its 
strength is reflected in New York. The 
price is steady here at from 20 to 22c. 
Stocks are light in Toronto hands, the bulk 
of those held being of rather low grade. 
There are some choice coffees, however, 
quoted at 21^ to 22c. Mild coffees are un- 
changed and firm at 25 to 30c. for green 
Javas, 28 to 35c. for Padang, 40c. for colory 
V.O.G. Javas. Mochas are quiet at from 
28c. up. 

DRIED FRUIT. 
Merchants are not sending in orders very 
freely ior dried fruit, and that staple is hav . 
ing a quiet time. The Valencia raisin mar- 
ket is very little changed. There is some 
off-stalk fruit obtainable at 5c, but it is of 
very common quality For good fruit job- 
bers are firm at S l A c - upwards. Selected is 
quoted at 7 to lYzC The stock of blue fruit 
remaining unsold is very inert merchandise 
at this time of year, and although it is of- 
fered at a concession on former prices, buy- 
ers are not forthcoming. The shading of a 
price sometimes has the effect of closing off 
the demand, which becomes mistrustful of 



the stability of current prices and reserves 
itself for further breaks. London layers can 
be bought under $2.25. Currants remain 
steady at from 5^c. upwards. There is a 
large stock in New York, but it is held in 
pretty firm hands at the moment, holders 
looking forward to a sufficient development 
of the demand by spring to take up all they 
control. Prunes are firm and stocks are not 
likely to be so slow moving as they were a 
year ago, the scarcity of dried and evapor- 
ated apples being a factor in favor of large 
consumption. U's are 7^ to 8c, B's 8 to 
8#c, C's 8Xc, D's 8#c. Figs are steady 
at 4'<£ to 5c. in bags, and 11 to 16c. in boxes. 
The demand for nuts is of small volume, the 
prices remaining as quoted in Prices Cur- 
rent. 

RICE AND SPICES. 

The rice market is steady and, as usual, 
unchanged. Purchases are of the average 
magnitude on the whole, but they are mostly 
in the way of small parcels. Common rice 
is-3^ to 4c, Japan 5 to 5^c, and all other 
sorts are as they were. 

Both pepper and gingec are firm just now 
and in very good demand. Cloves are quiet, 
but they are firm. In all other lines the spice 
market is very quiet. 

SUGAR. 

The sugar market retains all the firmness 
it acquired with the last advance. Refiners 
still refuse to book orders ahead on the 
basis of present prices. Both those that are 
shut down and those that are still running 
keep strictly to present business. Whole- 
salers do not evince much desire to specu- 
late. They doubtless remember the issue 
of former attempts of this sort and refrain 
from repeating them and reaping the same 
experience. Nor do retailers manifest much 
inclination to get hold of stock at current 
prices. They find it hard enough to get pro- 
fits adequate to repay them for handling, 
without trying to add the cost of carrying to 
their selling price. There has been a con- 
siderable movement of sugar, but it has 
probably been all called for by the increase 
in the consumptive capacity which low prices 
have brought about. Granulated is unchanged 
at 4^ to 4^c, yellow at 3%c. upwards. 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

The lowest price for good merchantable 
syrup is 2>ic. Anything offered at a much 
lower figure is seldom taken twice, and is in 
nearly every case United States syrup. The 
demand is limited, but is expected to in- 
crease considerably in the near future. 

Molasses is quiet. The call for New 
Orleans stock is probably stronger than for 
any other description. The price is 32c. up- 
wards. West Indian quotes from 35c. 

TEA. 

Tea is now receiving more attention than 
any other commodity handled by grocers. 
The attention is mostly confined, however, 
to enquiry, orders, for some unaccountable 
reason, being held back by retailers. They 
have nothing to gain by continuing this 
policy ; it has brought them nothing but 
higher prices up to the present, and it will 
do them no better service in the future. Job- 
bers who a month ago would have shaded a 
cent on large blocks are more likely to go 
as much in the other direction now. Teas 
of all kinds, whose value is included any- 
where in the range between 18 and 33c, are 
very desirable property aDd are firmly held. 
Inquiry is again cropping up from the Unit- 
ed States, and samples of Japan tea held at 
about 1 8c. have been forwarded. Other 
points in the Union have likewise signified a 
want for teas, and have asked prices on 



somewhat higher grades. One broker here 
held a round lot of Japans up till the end of 
last week for a New York house, to which 
he has shipped it. The market is likely to 
be a very bare one by next June. All teas 
at about 18c. are wanted. The London mar- 
ket has made another advance. The most 
common China tea, stock that the Canadian 
trade would not handle, could not be laid 
down here now under 15c. up to next May. 
Indian tea that quoted 5^d. last January is . 
now 9d., or equal to about 19c. here. 



MARKET NOTES. 



[Importers, wholesale merchants and manufac- 
turers should send any items intended for this 
department so that they may reach the head 
office not later than Wednesday morning. The 
•ditor will always welcome such information.] 

The Pure Gold Manufacturing Co. finds 
an increasing demand for its Pure Gold 
Baking Powder. 

Clemes Bros, have received a car of extra 
fancy Palermo lemons, of the same descrip- 
tion as those that took so well last year. 

Tomatoes ranking about equal to Bowlby's 
Little Chief were sold in London, England, 
a short time ago at a price equal to 93c. 

W. T. Harris, Chatham, N. B., dealer in 
general merchandise, offers 200 cases 
canned lobsters, also dried cod of finest 
quality. 

Sloan & Crowther received on Tuesday 
their first shipment of Aylmer chicken soup. 
A shipment of Little Chief Faultless tom- 
atoes has also just arrived. 

Messrs. Regan, White & Co., of Montreal, 
are offering a large lot of their well-known 
white clover brand pure cane sugar syrup. 
It should prove a seller at this season. 

The packers have turned down additional 
orders recently for " Star " brand canned 
lobster, 1893 season pack, and give it to be 
understood that they are "out of the mar- 
ket." 

Eby, Blain & Co. are receiving numerous 
repeat and special orders for five and ten 
case lots of their Orient brand of package 
tea. This is due to the self- selling merit of 
the goods. 

Eby, Blain & Co. have received another 
large consignment of Sphinx prunes. These 
goods are just now in seasonable demand, 
and are in especial request owing to the 
scarcity of evaporated apples. 

Seven or more carloads of sun-dried apples 
have been purchased by exporters during 
the past week. Prices not transpired. Some 
parcels of evaporated were taken at ice. for 
prime quality. — N. Y. Commercial Bulletin. 

Lucas, Steele & Bristol report a very fair i 
sorting up in teas during tris month. Their 
stock is still large and well sorted, and they 
will be pleased to for ward samples at anytime. 
L. S. & B. do not think there are enough 
Japans in the country to last until new crops 
arrive. 

The new season's make of Cairn's Home- 
Made Marmalade is now being offered to 
the trade by Messrs. Blackstock Bros., Mon- 
treal, the Canadian Agents. They report 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




NO TRAVELLERS 



-r 



-ON— 

-THE- 

ROAD— 

F your wholesale 
house does not keep 
"KENT" Pickles in 
stock, order Direct from 
us. You cannot afford in 
your own interests to sell 
poor goods, or goods that 
your customers may not 
like. "KENT" Pickles 
always please. Try them. 

THE KENT CANNING 4 PICKLING CO. 

CHATHAM, ONT. 

the "Lion Brand" 

is so popular that UNSCRUPULOUS 
packers have adopted it. To prevent the 
public from being imposed on we have in 
addition lithographed the word "BOULTER" 
across the face of each label in a distinctive 
color. Look out for the word "BOULTER" 
if you want first class " canned goods." 

Bay of Quinte 

Canning Factories. 

PICTON and DEMQRESTVILLE. 

W. BOULTER & SONS, 

PROPRIETORS, 

PICTON, ONT. 



FINNAN- 



HADDIES 



Direct from Packers. 

BEFORE PLACING YOUR ORDERS GET 
QUOTATIONS FROM 

L. H. DOBBIN, - MONTREAL. 




^Jvilp fO-PAV "fH£rJ, 
UJifH A f^i Br*\ amp 

"DO YOlJ? 

advertCsemen i~ 
4» in the 4* 

COJsfTr^JCr- 

fJECORO, 

Tof^Olsl-fO 
will bring yocc 
tenders/ ram the 
&€ft contractors. 



It always pays to 

BUY THE BEST 

Goods. Fresh Fruits and Vegetables can 
be had every day, by using the Lakeport 
Preserving Co's Canned Goods. All goods 
guaranteed. Try them once and you will 
use no other. 

Lakeport Preserving Co., 

Lakeport, Ont. 

Factories at Lakeport and Trenton 



Nothing succeeds like success.' 




The sale of our 

BEAVER BRAND 

PICKLES 

INCREASED 

79 PER CENT. 

DURING THE LAST YEAR. 



Wishing all our Friends a 
Happy and Prosperous New Year. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO., 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 

TORONTO. 



JWAPliE PRODUCTS. 

Having large warehouses at Sherbrooke, the centre of the 
largest Maple product territory in the world. We offer to the trade, 
all Maple products of the finest quality, in quantities and packages 
suited to any locality. Special inducements on car lots. 

Address 

Sherbrooke Maple Product Co., 

Sherbrooke, P. Q., Canada. 




DAILEY'S 



Please try them. 
His boys eat them. 

Prepared by the 

Kingsville 
Preserving Co., 

(LIMITED.) 

KINGSVILLE, ONT. 



Boy 

Brand 

Tomatoes 





BUYERS! 



OUR interests are identi- 
cal. It has paid us to pack 
a superior quality of Canned 
Goods. It will pay you to 
sell them. Our sales for 
1892 have doubled 1891. 
You may double yours by securing now, while the 
price is right and stock fresh and complete, a full 
assortment of our leading lines. 

All of which is guaranteed strictly Al. 

Delhi Fruit ^Vegetable Canning Co., 

FACTORIES : Delhi, Ont, and Niagara on the Lake, 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MARKETS— Continued 

that the official awarding of the title of 
" Purveyor of Marmalade to Her Majesty 
the Queen " seems to have drawn the atten- 
tion of the public very forcibly to this favoiite 
brand. Though for two seasons there had 
been none available for this market, yet last 
season's sales were very satisfactory. 

A. E. Carpenter, of the Ontario Canning 
Co., Hamilton, has just returned from Great 
Britain, where he has been making enquiries 
as to the probabilities of a market for Cana- 
dian canned goods. He is very much taken 
with the idea that there is a great future 
ahead tor the trade in tomatoes and peas, 
but not for corn as the British taste has not 
been cultivated in that direction yet. They 
are now extensive importers of tomatoes 
from the States and from Portugal. One 
firm alone imported 52,ooofrom Philadelphia. 
The Portuguese tomatoes are the best and 
in the green state slow better color than 
Canadian, but in cans the Ontario pack is 
equal in flavor and better in quality, there 
being less water in it. Mr. Carpenter sold a 
trial shipment of 1,000 cases. 

PETROLEUM. 

In the oil market prices remain unchanged 
and business quiet. Canadian refined quotes 
at 14 to I4j^c, and other grades at the 
figures given in our Prices Current. 

The Petrolia Advertiser reports : Petrolia 
crude $1.18 per barrel ; Oil Springs crude 
$1.19 per barrel. Avery firm feeling prevails 
all along the line. Crude continues at $1.18 
with very little business doing. The v eather 
has been so cold the past few weeks that it 
keeps producers busy keeping their wells 
going, the blizzard having hidden most of 
them from view. Refined is moving out 
rather freely, with quotations the same as 
last week, io}4 to 11c, car lots. As soon as 
the weather moderates some of the more 
prominent drillers will have their hands full, 
as in interviews with several the past week 
we find them with contracts ahead for close 
on two hundred wells, with our Oil Springs 
friends busy right along as well. 

BTJTTEK AND CHEESE. 

The market is still sparingly supplied. 
The price of large rolls is 16 to 18c. for good 
stock and 14 to 16c. for anything not of 
prime quality. The deliveries continue to 
be nearly altogether in the form of rolls. 
Choice dairy tub butter is very scarce and is 
firm at 18 to 20c. 

The cheese market has taken a strong up- 
ward turn in England. Prices are therefore 
very firm here. Good fall stock is quoted at 

12c. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Are offered out of store at $1.20 
to $1.35. The former price is for a very com- 
mon grade. 



5<;j 

While the best for all household use, has 
peculiar qualities for easy and quick 
washing of clothes. 

We sell it ! So do all the best Wholesale Grocers in Canada. 

The St. Croix Soap Mfg Co., 

Branches : St. Stephen, N.B., 

MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO : Wright & Copp, 40 Wellington St. East. 
WINNIPEG: E. W. Ashley. 



Dried Apples — The country is quite 
bare of stock. Buyers are going as high as 
5>£c., and jobbers are getting S^c. 

Evaporated Apples— The stock now 
available is of small proportions. The prices 
quoted range from jyi to 9c. tor new stock 
and as low as 6c. on old. 

Eggs -Strictly fresh are 25c, cold stored 
are 19c, limed 16 to i6j£c. 

Honey — The demand is small, and prices 
are steady at from 7 to 10c. for extracted and 
13 to 1 6c. for sections. 

Hops — Jobbing goes on at 18 to 20c, but 
brewers' orders are held back. The market 
appears to be in sellers' favor, however, as 
the stock is unusually good, and there does 
not seem to be an excess of it. 

Onions — Not many are to be seen in 
stock, owing to the difficulty of keeping them 
in cold weather. The price is $2.25 to $2 50 
per barrel. 

Potatoes — Are scarce, and not all that 
are offering can be classed as good. The 
best is worth as high as Soc. on track, and 
from that the prjce ranges down to 75c. Out 
of store lots are 90c. per bag. 

DRESsed Poultry— Chickens are 40 to 
60c. a pair, ducks are 55 to 85c. a pair, tur- 
keys are 12^ to 13c. per lb., geese 8}4 to 9c 
per lb. 

GREEN FRUIT. 

The weather has been more favorable to 
business. Retailers' orders are now both 
large and numerous, the time of year being 
considered. They evidently are getting in 
supplies, not only for present requirements 
but in preparation for another cold snap. It 



they are without the fruit when the weather 
is very cold they usually remain without un- 
til the weather moderates enough to make 
shipping safe. Valencias oranges are $4.50 
per box, Jamaicas $2.50 to $3 per box, 
Floridas $3 to $3.25 per box, Mandarines 
and Tangerines $3.25 to $3.75 per box, 
bananas are scarce at $1.75 to $2, pineapples 
are 20 to 30c, Malaga grapes are $8 to $9, 
fancy cranberries $10 per barrel, common 
$1 per basket, apples $1.50 to $2.85 per 
barrel. 



CANNED GOODS. 

TORONTO. 

There is a better feeling in the canned 
goods market. All this signifies is that buy- 
ers are not hammering so hard at prices as 
they were awhile ago. They realize that 
prices are remarkably low, and that success 
in efforts to depreciate them farther does 
not beget confidence. Every concession 
they obtained in the past made them more 
chary of parting with their big orders. They 
have consequently been less grudging of 
their orders recently and have gone out a 
little farther than the strict measure of the 
moment's needs. The price is rather steady 
at from 85c. to $1. No report of the result 
of the trial shipment sent to England has 
yet been received. Fruits are in slightly 
better request. Salmon is rather a slow- 
selling line, but it is firm at from $1.45 up. 



TORONTO, - - Jan. 27, '93. 

we-paYING are 

.'4f.'o.B. 

BRIGf\T--DRY--SOUND 
NEW CROP 

DRIED APPLES. 



4 



WE ARE 



BUYING 




Address 



STANWAY & BAYLEY 

42 FBONT ST., EAST, TORONTO. 



-TERMS- 

PRICE— Good for one week from 
date, for not exceeding 10 Bar- 
rels from any one shipper. Lar- 
ger lots subject to confirmation 
before shipment. All others can 
be made without advice, bat 
subject terms stated. 

SIGHT DRAFT— Or local pay-or- 
ders honoured, 10 days after 
shipment made. 

QUALITY.-Bright, dry, and sound 
new -crop stock. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



2L 



^fc #"^ Choice Natural 
in bags 
about 55 lbs. 






10 lb. boxes 

Choice Elenie 

4 Row 



44c 
10k 



. . (lenies Bros . . 



Phone. 1766 



Toronto 




Daniel G. Trench & Co., 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
CANNING FACTORY OUTFITTERS. 

GENERAL AOEKTS FOB 

SPRACUE MFC. CO., FAKNHAM, N. Y 
CANNING MACHINERY of all kinds. 




THEY ARE RIGHT. 

We have packed all kinds of Vegetables, Fruits, 
etc , and our CANNED GOODS are in the hands 
of the wholesalers. 

Our Factory New Throughout. 

The Strathroy Canning and Pre- 
serving Co., Ltd., 

STRATHROY, - ONT. 



UY THE BEST. 

SEELY'S 

Celebrated 
Flavoring 
Extracts. 

VANILLA, LEMON, 

and Assorted Flavors. 
Standard Goods of Am- 
erica (established in 
1862). Once tried, al- 
ways used. 

Seely Manufacturing Co, 

Detroit, Mich. - Windsor, Ont. 




PRESH FISH 

: : Sptendid 



Stock 



MANITOBA WHITEFISH, 
SALMON TROUT, 
CODFISH, HADDOCK, 
MACKEREL' SMELTS, 
FLOUNDERS, Etc. 

fe. y D. W. PORT & CO., 

Filled. Wholesale Fish Agents, 

Esplanade, - - TORONTO. 



THE FINEST 

IN THE LAND. 




EVERY CHOCOLATE IS STAMPED 

G-. IB. 



GANONG BROS., Ltd. 

ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



English 
Malt 

Six GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO.,* Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

GILLARDS Specialties 

High Class, English Made, 

"ZEsTZE^W" Pickles and "HSriE^T" Sauce, 

/"* 1 A pr\ Qj ("*("} Wallhamstow, London, Eng., and of 

^* LLnnJJ 00 "0\-f., Wholesale Grocers in the Dominion. 

"J ersey B rand" C ondensed Milk, 

It is guaranteed Pure and Unskimmed. 

An excellent food for Infants. 

We make only the one quality — THE BEST. 

Buy only the JERSEY BRAND for all pur 

poses. Sold by Grocers, Outfitters and others. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FORREST CANNING CO'Y, 

HALIFAX, N.S 
STANWAY & BAYLEY, Agents, Toronto. 





W. A. Carson. 



R. B. Morden. 



J. AnninR. 



BELLEVILLE CANNING CO. 



-PACKERS OF THE- 



"Queen Brand" 

Fruits and Vegetables. 

All our goods are packed with the greatest care and clean- 
liness, and as we are on the market to stay we will only 



put out 

FIRST-CLASS GOODS. 

We respectfully ask the trade to recom- 
mend this brand to their customers; 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MA RKBTS. — Continual 

HOGS AND PROVISIONS. 

Hogs are still scarce, but the rate of de- 
livery has risen above last week's point. 
Prices are consequently easier, cars quoting 
$8.40 to $8.60. All products are firm at for- 
mer prices. 

Bacon — Long clear io}4 to 11c. Smoked 
backs are 12^ to 13c, bellies I3^c., rolls 
10c. 

Hams— Are 13c. 

Lard — Pure Canadian is uc. in tubs, 
and I2^c. in pails. Compound is 10 to 
io#c. . 

Barrel Pork— U. S. heavy mess is $20 
to $21. Canadian short cut is $21.50 to 
$22. 

Dressed Meats — Beef feres are 5 to 6c. 
hindquarters 7 to 8)4c, veal 6% to 8c, mut- 
ton byi to 7c, lamb 7c. to 8j£c. 
FISH AND OYSTERS. 

The demand for fresh fish appears to be 
on the increase, though the outward move- 
ment of stock is still too slow to satisfy sell- 
ers. Prices of all descriptions remain as they 
were, that is as follows : 7c. for trout and 
ordinary whitefish, 7}4c. for Manitoba 
whitefish, 4c. per lb. or $2 to $2.25 per hund- 
red for Lake herring, 10c. for mackerel, 13c. 
for B. C. salmon, 7c. for smelts, 5 to 5^c. 
for haddock, 4 to 4^c. for market cod, 7c. 
for steak cod, 4c. for flounders, 6>£c. for 
skinned and boned codfish, $6, for Labra- 
dor herring, $5 to $5.50 for shore herring, 
11 to I2^c. for Digby herring, 4c. for 
boneless fish, 7 to 8c. for boneless cod, 
oysters are scarce, and the price has been 
advanced to $1.75. 

HIDES, SKINS, WOOL,, [TALLOW. 

Wool — Fleeces are steady at 18 to 19c. 
Pulled wools are worth 22 to 23c. for super, 

6to 27c. for extra. 

Skins — Sheepskins are scarce at $1 to 
si. 1 5. Calfskins are unchanged at 5 to 7c. 

Hides — No. 1 green cows' are 4>£c. 
Cured are $%c. 

Tallow — Is quiet at 5#c for rendered 
and 2c. for rough. 



MONTREAL MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 26, 1893. 

[As there is often inequality in the prices of the 
various sellers on this market, owing to differ- 
ences in buying conditions and other circum- 
stances, and as prices are modified by both quan- 
tity and quality, the quotations §iven below, and 
in our Prices Current, necessarily take a wide 
ranee.] 

GROCERIES. 

The grocery trade has furnished a satis- 
factory volume of business during the week, 
refined sugar having been placed in fair 
quantities at the late advance in prices. In 
fact refiners are compelled to pursue a 
conservative course about taking orders 
ahead by the position of the raw sugar 
market. The product keeps very firm, and 
those buyers who are waiting for a decline 
in values before securing the cargoes are not 
meeting with much encouragement at any 
of the sources of supply, either in Brazil, the 
West Indiesjava, or the Philippine Islands. 
Syrups are somewhat lower owing to lower 
offerings of American and Barbadoes. Mol- 
asses is very firm and stocks are in except- 
ionally small compass. Teas exhibit marked 
firmness, and in lines of produce, the same 
feeling prevails notably in the case of hogs, 
eggs, and potatoes. On the whole the new 



year is opening on a strong situation with 
the prospects of a good spring trade becom- 
ing more prominent every day. 
SUGAR. 
The week has not deveveloped any change 
of great importance either in refined or raw 
sugar, but there has been a fair volume of 
trade in the former from the refineries at a 
steady range. In fact buyers show more 
and more disposition to operate ahead, but 
the state of the market for raw material calls 
for a conservative course, and refiners are 
following it at present and booking orders 
only for a very short time ahead. Buyers of 
raw stock have been hoping that the market 
will shape itself to permit of cost and freight 
business for spring delivery on a lower basis, 
but it refuses decidedly to be accommodat- 
ing in this respect, and no cargoes can be 
booked either at Java or the Philippine Isl- 
ands at the reduction which buyers wish. 
Advices from New York to brokers here cite 
a very firm disposition on raw, a part cargo 
of Muscavado leaving first hands there at 
an advance of i-i6c, at 3 i-i6c. for .89 test. 
Two other small cargoes of China and St. 
Domingo centrifugal stock were sold at 
3 7- 1 6c. for 96 test. The tone on the whole, 
therefore, is very firm, and we quote from the 
refineries here in straight lots as follows : — 
Granulated, 4Hc; bright yellows, 4 to 4J-£c, 
and lower grade 3>£c. 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

The market for syrups is quiet, but with 
the approach of Lent a freer movement is 
anticipated. A fair quantity of Canadian in 
the wood has been moved at 1% to 2>£c., 
while American has been sold lower for poor 
stock at 19 to 20c. 

With stocks of Barbadoes molasses in re- 
markably small compass holders are firm 
and will not part with any large quantity, 
being fully satisfied that the regular jobbing 
movement from now out will be more than 
sufficient to absorb the remaining stock. 
The best figure now is 34c. 

TEAS. 

There has been a good demand for tea 
both on home and United States account on 
this market and the firmness of the previous 
week is intensified if anything. Japans have 
furnished most ot the sales, a round lot of 
1,600 packages being disposed of on Chicago 
account. We note fair local sales also at 14 
to I4>£c. for common, i6>£c for medium 
while fine has been taken at 21 to 22c. with 
sales of choice goods as high as 3o^c. In 
fact holders are disposed to ask for an ad- 
vance, and higher volumes are not improb- 
able in the near future in view of the light 
supplies while it is certain that orders could 
not be placed now at anything like the figures 
possible at the first of the year. For black 
teas a fair demand is reported and a few in- 
voices have been put through on English ac- 
count at from 7d. to is. In fact buyers all 
round are beginning, as the GROCER pointed 
out last week — to realize that it is useless 
to hold off for lower prices. 

COFFEES AND SPICES. 

A good deal of business has transpired in 
coffee during the past week, any lots of Rio 
offering being eagerly picked up at 18 to 21c. 
as to quality. Maracaibo has sold quite 
freely at 18^ to 19,^ c. in round lots for these 
figures would have to be advanced upon for 
jobbing parcels. We quote Jamaica and 
Rios i8j£ to 20c; Maracaibo 18^ t0 20>£c., 
Java 25 to 27c; and Mocha 25 to 30c. 

The spice market continues strong and 
buyers show more disposition to operate. 
We quote black pepper 7}ic. % cloves 7% to 



8>£c. and nutmegs 50c. to $1 according to 
quality. 

RICE. 
A small jobbing trade is doing in rice, but 
there is no movement from first hands. We 
quote standard $3.85, choice $4.25 and high- 
er grades $5 to $7. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

The demand for dried fruit has shown 
some improvement during the week, but 
only for good sound stock, the cheap trashy 
stuff going a begging as usual. Almost any 
price would be accepted for it, and this fact 
acts as a check with some buyers, and there- 
fore does considerable damage to business. 
Round lots of good sound Valencia off stock 
seconds have moved at 4^ to 4j£c, while 
the offerings of prime are light and firmly 
held, 5c. net for a straight wholesale lot be- 
ing the idea. Layers are meeting a fair call, 
a round lot of Valencia changing hands the 
other day at 6 to 6%c. 

The currant market is quiet but distinctly 
firm, and we note some sales at 5 to ^%c. as 
to quality. Practically all the stock here is 
in the hands of a leading wholesale firm. 
NUTS. 

Trade in nuts has been slow, but prices 
are steady an4 unchanged. We quote : — 
Pecans 1 itoi2Xc,Terragona almondsi6^c, 
Grenoble walnuts 13^ to I4j£c.,filberts 10 to 
ioj^c, Ivica i4K c -» Brazil 15c, marbots 
i2)4c, cocoa nuts $3.50 to $4.50 per bag of 
100 for old, new $5 to $5.50. 

FRUIT. 

Trade in fruit has been fair during the 
week, but there have been no specially strik- 
ing features. 

Lemons have met a good demand, and we 
quote Messina $3.30 to $3.50, prime $2.75 to 
$3, and common $2 to $2.25 as to quality. 

Oranges have furnished a fair business. 
We quote fancy Floridas $3.2$ to $3. 50, Va- 
lencias $4 to $4.25, Messina $2.50 to $2.75 
per box, and Jamafcas $5 to $6 per barrel. 

Figs have met a good demand at 5 to 
5>£c. per lb. Sales of crystalized have been 
made at $1 per 5 lb. box. 

Dates have ruled quiet at $ l /% to 6c. for 
new and y/z to 5c. for old. 

There is no change in dried stock, which 
we quote as follows : Dried apples i,% to 
5c, evaporated 6 to 7^c. 
FISH. 

The fish market continues in very good 
shape under a good demand and very mod- 
erate supplies. The feeling is very firm 
therefore at the following quotations: Had- 
dock 4:., cod 3 to 3}4c, steak cod 4)£ to 5c, 
lake trout 7c, white fish 7 to 7'/z^-> pickerel 
or dore 8c; dried cod, $5.50; No. 1 green 
cod, $5-75 to 6$; B.C.salmon,$i3perbrl.; La- 
brador salmon, $13 to $14; No. 2 mackerel, 
$14 per brl.; do. $7 per halfbrl.; Labrador 
herring, $5. 2 5 to $5.50 per brl.; C.B. and N. 
S. herring, $5.25 per brl.; tommy cods, $2 to 
$2.2r per brl.; fresh herring, $1.85 per hun- 
dred'; haddies, 7to7^c; Yarmouth bloat- 
ers, $1.25 to $1.50; common do., $1; fresh 
frozen mackerel, 10 to ioj^c. each; No. 1 
lake trout, $4.75 to $5 per keg. 
APPLES. 

The market is quiet and unchanged at $2 
to $2.75, as to size of lot and quality. More 
poor returns have been received from Liver- 
pool. 

POTATOES. 

The potato market continues firm and 

prices show a still further advance under 

light supplies. Car lots have changedhands 

here at 95c. to $1.05, an advance of 5 to 15c, 

(Continued on page 24.) 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



23 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

TORONTO. 

The flour market is both dull and easy, 
and shippers are rather depressed with the 
state of the market, which they had calcu- 
lated on making a turn in their favor before 
this. The hopeful tendencies observed some 
time ago have proved disappointing, how- 
ever, and now the condition of the market is 
as bad as it was before. 

Flour. — City millers' and dealers' prices 
are: Manitoba patents, $4.60; strong bakers' 
$4.25 ; white wheat patents, $4.50 ; straight 
roller, $3.40; low grades, per bag, $1.25 to 
$1.50. 

Car prices are : Toronto freights — Mani- 
toba patents, $4.30 to$4-4o ; Manitoba 
strong bakers' $3.75 to $3.90; Ontario 
patents, $3.25 to $3.50 ; straight roller, $3.15 
to $3.30 ; extra, $2.60 tc $2.70; low grades, 
per bag, $1.00 to $1.25. 

Meal— Oatmeal is $3.80. Cornmeal is 
$3.50. 

Feed— Bran is $12, shorts is $13.00 
to $15 mixed feed $22, feeding corn 57 to 
58c, oats 30 to lie. 

Hay— Baled timothy is $9. 

Straw— Is steady at $5.50 to $5-75- 

MONTREAL. 

There is a very fair local movement in flour 
with several export enquiries that promise to 
result in something Winter wheat $4.25 
to $4.50; spring patent, $3.25 to $4.50 ; 
straight rollers $3.55 to $3.75. extra $3.20 to 
$3.25 ; superfine $2.65 to 2.90; city strong 
bakers $4. 10 to 0.00 ; strong bakers $4.00 
to $4.10. 

ST. JOHN, N. B., 

The advance in breadstuffs, which was no- 
ticed in our last, has not had the affect anti- 
cipated, as, beyond a few sales made at first, 
very little seems to be moving. Buyers are 
evidently of opinion that the time is not ripe 
for higher prices. Dealers still claim they 
are selling below what can be landed at, 
and quotations are : Manitoba, $5.20 to $5.- 
30 ; High grade Ontario, $430 to $445 ; 
Medium patents, $4.10 to $4.25. 

Oatmeal — Not much moving, and prices 
steady at advance $4.15 to $4 25. 

Cornmeal — No change. Sales made are 
$2.75 to $2.85. 

Feed is quoted at $20 to $21 per ton. 




Brantford 

and 

Pelee Island 



J. 8. HAMILTON & CO'T, 

Brantford, Ont 
Sole Agents for Canada. 



PURE CONFECTIONERY, 

FINEST BISCUITS. 

Manufactured by 

J. McLAUGHLAN & SONS, 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters translated from or written in any 
foreign language. 

J. H. CAMERON, 10 Front St. E. 

The Western Milling Company 

(Limited.) 

REGINA, ASSA. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

High Grade Flours, 
Hungarian Patent, 
and Strong Bakers. 

We also handle Hard Wheat Oats, and 
other kinds of feed. 

We would solicit the patronage of the 
Millers' of the Eastern Provinces, wanting 
Manitoba Hard Wheat. All orders en- 
trusted to us will be carefully and promptly 
filled. 



Correspondence Solicited. 

Embro 
Oatmeal 
Mills 

D. R. ROSS, - - EMBRO, ONT. 

A CHOICE QUALITY OF 

Roller, Standard and Granulated 

Oatmeal 

IN BARRELS , HALF BARR ELS OR BACS. 

Selected WHITE OATS only used. For prices 
ol Oatmeal or OathulJsin Car-loadsorless quan- 
tities, write or wire, and will reply promptly. 
Can ship via Canadian Pacific or Grand Trunk 



OATMEAL 



Dominion Mills. 

LONDON. 

Excelsior Mills. 

MITCHELL. 

Write or wire for Thomson's Brands 

ROLLED OATS, PINHEAD & STANDARD MEALS. 

SPLIT PEAS, POT BARLEY, CORN MEAL, ETC. 

Ail kinds of Chop and Mill Feed. 

ceNeral craiH dealer. 

Highest price paid for Oats and Peas in car lots. 

WALTER THOMSON, 



London and 

Mitchell. 



Railways. 



BRANDON ROLLER MILLS. 

Brandon, Man. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

Hungarian, Patent, Strong 1 Bakers 

- FLOUR - 

Also Oatmeal, Rolled Oats, Rolled Oatmea 

Granulated and Standard. 

Dealers in all kinds of grain and feed. 

ALEXANDER, KELLY & COY, 

PROPRIETORS. 

N.WENGER&BROS., 

AYTON, ONT. 

- - MILLERS - - 

(Hungarian Process) 



BRANDS = 

KLEBER, MAY BL OSSOM. 

AGENTS = 
J. L. SMITH & SON, - Montreal. 
EPHRAIM ERB, - Halifax. 



R. M. PINCOMBE. 



W. W. SUTHERLAND. 



STRATHROY OATMEAL AND CORNMEAL MILLS. 

Pincombe & Sutherland, 

STEATHROT, OZDTT.A.IRIO- 

Manufacture by the latest improved process 

The Celebrated White Eagle Brand of Rolled Oatmeal, 

also Standard and Granulated Oatmeal, CORNMEAL, Dessicated Rolled Wheat and 
Wheat Germ, put up in barrels, half barrels and bags. Write or wire us for samples and 
prices. 

N.B.— The only mills putting up Rolled Oatmeal in Cotton Bags. 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



GENUINE CREAMERY BUTTER 

In lots of 5 tubs and upwards, price 23^2 cts. per lb., cash ; single 
tubs 50 lbs. each, will be shipped as samples on receipt of $12. 

JACKSON & HALLETT ^°^«|o E ^^^ BOT ™» 



MONTREAL ifarktti Continued. 

and jobbing quantities cannot now be had 
for less than $1.10 to $1.15. 

DRESSED POULTRY 
Light receipts and a good demand are the 
features and prices are somewhat higher. 
We quote turkeys, \yA to 14c. for finest, 
poorer kinds selling at 12 to 13c. Chickens 
have sold all the way from g)4 to 12c. and 
geese 10 to 11c. Ducks are scarce and firm 
at 12 to 13c. 

DRESSED HOGS. 
The market remains firm with sales of car 
lots at $8.80 to $8.90 per 100 lbs. 
PROVISIONS. 
The demand for provisions is not large 
but very fair for this season of the year. 
We quote as follows : Canadian short cut, 
per brl. $21 to $22 ; Mess pork, Western, 
new, per brl $21 to $22.00 ; Hams, city 
cured, per brl. I2j£ to 13c. ; Lard, Canadian, 
in pails 10X toio^c. ; Bacon, per lb., 11 yi 
to 12c. ; Lard, com, refined, per lb., 9 to 

EGGS. 

The egg market holds very firm under a 
good enquiry from the United States, but 
the local demand is slow. We quote Mont- 
treal limed 21 to 22c, good held fresh 23 to 
25c. and choice boiling 30c. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

Butter remains as before under a moder- 
ate jobbing call. We quote as follow : — 
Creamery, 22 to 23c; Townships 20 to 22c; 
Morrisburg andBrockville 18 to 19c; West- 
ern dairy 17 to 18c. 

The stock of cheese here is now so re- 
duced that the market is fixed practically 
until the new season. 



ST. JOHN, N. B., MARKETS. 

St. John, N. B., Jan. 26, 1893. 

GROCERIES. 

" Trade is quiet," was the reply to your 
correspondent in his search for news among 
the grocers. Everyone seems frozen in, as 
the very steady low temperature for several 
weeks has been unprecedented. Old Probs 
says warmer weather, and hopes are enter- 
tained for improvement in the grocery line. 
Values in all staples are not much changed. 
Collections are slower than might be expect- 
ed, while all are preparing for taking stock, 
which is usually done the last week in Janu- 
ary or the first in February. 

SUGAR — The market is firm and prices 
have advanced somewhat, the quotations 
given are : Granulated 4.40 to 4#c, yellows 
3 l A to 3Kc, extra C. 3H to 4c. 

Syrups— Are dull and likely to remain 
quiet. 

Provisions— The market is very firm at 
late advances, and in some lines stocks are 
decidedly low. Pork is quoted $21 to $25 
per bbl., beef $14 to $15. Lard, pure 13 to 
14c, compound 11 to 12c; smoked hams 13 
to 14c, rolls 11 to 12c. 



TINNED SALMON DANGERS. 

Yesterday week the Birmingham City 
Coroner, Mr, Oliver Pemberton, held an in- 
quest at the Victoria Courts, touching the 
death of Joseph Mason Robinson (43), who 
died at his residence in St. George street, St. 
George's, on December 30th. Mrs. Robin- 
son, the widow, stated that on the 28th ult. 
she bought a tin of salmon, as several friends 
were to take tea with the family that after- 
noon. She paid sevenpence for the fish, 
which she purchased from Mrs. Butler, in 
Summer Lane. The shopkeeper opened the 
tin. When buying it she asked Mrs. Butler 
if the salmon was good. There was a white 
frothy substonce at the top, and witness said, 
"I don't-care for the looks of this." Mrs 
Butler replied, " It's all right," and added 
that she sold a large quantity of the salmon 
every year. The deceased, witness and their 
friends all partook heartily of the salmon, 
and after tea witness and her husband 
went out together for a walk. They 
had three or four glasses of brandy 
and water, reached home again at half- 
past ten, and went to bed at midnight. 
On the next morning deceased complained 
of illness, and vomited excessively during 
that and the succeeding days. Medical 
assistance was procured, but deceased died 
on the 30th. Albert Slinn, a brother-in-law 
of the deceased, said he was present at the 
tea and partook of the tinned salmon. The 
Coroner : And was there bread and butter 
on the table? Witness : Yes. The Coroner: 
And did you eat some? Witness: Yes; 
twelve or fourteen lengths. (Laughter.) 
Witness added thai he took the largest share 
of the salmon and felt no ill effects. The 
Coroner : No ; you were wise enough to eat 
a quantity of other food with it. That 
probably saved your life. Witness : Well, 
I felt very hungry, sir. (Laughter.) When 
we were eating the salmon we all said it 
was rather cold. After the salmon witness 
had five or six glasses of ale to drink. The 
wife of this witness gave similar evidence. 
She said she felt none the worse for the 
salmon, oi which she took two tables poonfuls. 
Further evidence showed that the salmon was 
purchased by Mrs. Butler a fortnight pre- 
viously from Thomas Hiram, 365, New John 
street West. This gentlemen was called and 
stated that he had kept tinned salmon for 
ten years in order to test it, and found the 
fish perfectly sound. The tin in question was 
part of a quantity of 200 dozen he bought 
from a Liverpool firm. It might have been 
in his warehouse a few months, or two years; 
it was impossible to say how long. He had 



another tin from the same case, and was pre- 
pared to open it, and eat part of it in court. 
The Coroner : No, thank you. The result 
might be unpleasant. Mr. Astley Prosser, 
surgeon, Brearley street, stated that he was 
called in to see the deceased on the evening 
of the 28th ult. The man was suffering from 
the effects of irritant poison, and died in spite 
of the remedies applied. A post-mortem 
examination revealed the fact that deceased 
only had one kidney, and that very much 
diseased. The stomach was distended and 
ulcerated by a recent irritation. It contained 
four ounces of yellow thick fluid. No doubt 
the condition described was due to partak- 
ing of animal poison, such as decomposed 
salmon. Owing to the condition of his one 
kidney such a man as the diseased would be 
more seriously affected by unwholesome food. 
If his kidney organs had been in a natural 
condition he would most probably have got 
over the illness . Death was due to exhaus- 
tion following the vomiting and purging. 
The Coroner, in summing up the case, said 
that no doubt the process of sealing up tin- 
ned food was at times faulty, and hence oc- 
casionally we heard of people being poisoned 
as the diseased had been. High game was 
a great mistake, for it was a poison, a single, 
mouthful of which might poison anyone. Of 
course, as with any other putrid food, if it 
was eaten with wholesome food the danger 
was less. The jury found a verdict that de- 
ceased "Died from eating tinned salmon in 
an unwholesome state, he suffering at the 
time from organic disease of one kidney." 
— Manchester Grocers' Review. 




N. B.— The old Standard Brand of 
HORSESHOE Canned Salmon still 
cakes the lead, and affords the greatest satis- 
faction to both dealer and consumer, and for 
uniform excellence in quality and weight 
has no equal. 

EVERY CAN WARRANTED. 



J. H. TODD & SON, 

Victoria, B.C., Owners. 

AGENTS, Stanway & Bayley, Toronto. 

Agents (or Ontario 

W. S. Goodhugh & Co., Montreal. 

" Tees & Perss*, Winnipeg. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



FAMOUS 

" STAR " 

Sugar Cured Meats 

Mild, Sweet, Delicious Flavor. 

All live dealers have them. 

Be sure you have fresh stock 



F. W. FEARMAN, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



JUST RECEIVED 

4,500 Boxes 

Valencia Raisins 

WRITE FOR OUR PRICES. 



N. QUINTAL & FILS, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

2,4 St, Paul Street, Montreal. 



BALFOUR & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF TEAS 



-AND- 



WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

HAMILTON. 



WESTERN ONTARIO AGENTS FOR THE 

Irish Mustard. 

Cherry's DUBLIN Mustard is guaranteed ab- 
solutely PURE, and sold cheaper than the com- 
pound. Send for Prices. 



Special Tea 
Sale 



fturing thjs UJftonth, U»e 
fyaVe becibeb to cut ttje 
prices on all our 'Ceas 
qti6 l^ill styoU> ttye 1ro.be 
some splenbib lines at 
from 10 per cent, to 
1 5 per cent, belolu 
usual prices 



Don' fall to get our Prices 
and Samples 



J. W. LANC « (0. 



59, 61 and 63 

FRONT ST., B. 

Cor. Church 



COOKING FIGS. 

In Bags about 50 lbs. each. 
Fine Quality and Cheap. 

Sloan & Crowther, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

I 9 Front St. E., Toronto. 

ILlcil 

Our shipments now arriving ex S. S. Ar- 
dengorm and Broomhaugh, were purchased 
at the lowest point. 

Layers, very choicest quality. 

Best value in market. 



.& 



35 and 37 Front St. East, 

TORONTO, - ONT. 

— : We are offering a : — 

Blended Tea-25- - 

For Strength and Flavor it is Unequalled. 

Ask our Travellers to show it, or 
write us for Samples. 




SlTlith and 

Keighley 

9 Front St. E., Toronto. 



TEAS - - 



-« A SPECIALTY*. 



PERKINS, INCE & Co., 

41-43 Front St, East, 
TORONTO. 



JOHN BURGESS & SON 



SAUCE 

AND 

PICKLE 



MANUFACTURERS, 

\(YJ OTDAMn Corner of the Savoy 
III/ I II All U Steps, London, W.C 



Vide Sir Walter Scott's "St. 
Ronan's Well," Chaps. XVI. and 

XXX. 
Lord Byron's " Beppo," VIII. 

EDWARD ADAMS 

& CO. 

Importers of Teas 

AND 

Wholesale Grocers 

LONDON, ONT. 

SPECIAL BRAND TEA. 

LOOK OUT FOR 

G-O^T 

JAPAN TEA 
Nothing equal to it at the price. 
See our travellers. 

Write for samples and prices 

THUS. KINNEAR & CO. 

Wholesale Grocers, 

49 Front Street East, 
TOZROILTTO. 



Elliott, IM Co., 

Importers of Teas 



-AND- 



Wholesale Grocers. 



LONDON, ONT. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BLENDED TEA. 

It is sometimes asked by those who 
are not acquainted with the trade why 
various sorts of tea should be mixed to- 
gether before they are offered to the pub- 
lic, any more than it is found necessary 
to mix different wines together, such as 
ports with sherries or with clarets. The 
difference, however, is clear. The public 
require a distinctive flavor with wine, 
which can be readily maintained through 
the skill acquired in centuries of experi- 
ence in the vineyards. The industry is 
also conducted on a large scale, so that 
In reality the ports, sherries, or cham- 
pagnes of commerce represent, as a rule, 
a number of blends made before the wines 
reach this country ; but with tea, on the 
other hand, it is perfectly impossible 
from the novelty of the industry, and its 
small scale among the Indian or Ceylon 
planters who now mainly supply us, to 
ensure uniformity of quality from year 
to year. In fact, as is well known, hard- 
ly two chests are alike in a parcel of 
Indian teas when they originally reach 
this country. As retailers cannot there- 
fore secure continuity in any distinctive 
flavor from any special growth, they 
have to obtain it by blending. The rem- 
edy suggested by some, to the infinite 
amusement of those acquainted with the 
subject, is that the grocers should grow 
their own teas. The economical value of 
this suggestion would be only equalled 
by the grocer being advised to make his 
own boots or hat. But, putting that 
aside, such a remedy would only add 
tenfold to the existing necessity for 
blending, as the tea crop of any particu- 
lar estate is, broadly speaking, never 
alike two years running. 

Tea, indeed, varies almost infinitely in 
flavor, quality and strength, while on 
the other hand, the public demands al- 
most absolute uniformity in these re- 
spects. The produce of any one estate 
or group of estates is rarely alike two 
years running, and even were this diffi- 
culty possible to remove, little would be 
gained. The public demand runs upon 
a sort of neutral flavor in tea, which can 
only be secured by mixing together the 
produce of various districts, or even of 
countries, so far apart as India, Ceylon, 
China and Java. Further, while the pub- 
lic objects to any pronounced or distinc- 
tive flavor in tea, it still more strongly 
objects to any alteration in the char- 
acter of the flavor of the infusion sup- 
plied. Hence, before the consumer's cup 
is reached, the leaf must of necessity be 
very extensively mixed, and in the mix- 
ture lies the whole secret of 
success or failure in the tea 
trade. Nor Is blending likely to 
decrease, but, on the contrary, it is like- 
ly to increase, when teas of such marked 
different characters are offered as the 
fine, delicate Congous of China, the 
strong, flavory Darjeelings, the thick, 
pungent Assams, and all the varieties 
produced in Ceylon, in Java or in Japan. 
When teas came chiefly from China, there 
were not nearly the differences which 
now exist, when India and Ceylon supply 
the bulk of our consumption. If so, there 
is more than ever room for the skill of 
the blender. It must be remembered that 
the old "chops" of 300 or 600 chests of 
China tea, really represented an exten- 
sive and elaborate system of blending, 
carried out first in the interior, and then 



at the hongs or warehouses at the ship- 
ping ports. 

The old idea of tea mixing was to mix 
several kinds of China Congou together, 
and to add Scented Orange Pekoe and 
Oolongs in certain traditional propor- 
tions. Then came the day of thick Indian 
tea, and of the infusion which its enemies 
call tanin. The charge is partly just, 
but whether it be so or not, if the public 
like that substance in their tea, those 
who cater for them must supply it. The 
result, at any rate, of the new supply, is 
that the public have to a great degree 
turned from the old and more delicate 
flavors and gone on to something much 
stronger. Those who have not been quick 
enough to swim with the stream, have 
suffered materially in their trade. There 
is also little doubt that a great many 
retailers who undertake to blend teas, 
are, to put it gently, not successful in 
their mixtures, and thus give an opening 
to more skilled opponents. In these days 
when specialization is more and more es- 
sential in business, such openings are 
eagerly sought, and the amount of com- 
petition in the tea trade has been of 
late years increased a hundredfold. 

In the old days of high duties and small 
supplies, when the leading retail price 
was 4s., 5s., or even Gs. per pound, tea 
was naturally the sheet anchor of the 
grocer, particularly as it was then the 
custom to sell sugar at a loss. Now 
that tea has fallen to a quarter of such 
prices, the old percentage of profit, even 
if It could have been maintained, would 
obviously have yielded only one quarter 
of what it used to do. But the old per- 
centage of profit, far from being main- 
tained, has probably been reduced by 
quite one half, so that the grocer prob- 
ably does not on the average get more 
than a fourth, or even a fifth, of what 
he used to get out of a pound of tea ; 
the labor and many other expenses, be 
it noted, being still the same, or more. 

The increased competition is not al- 
ways of an unskilled nature. A tailor 
or a bookseller, or even a butter man 
might not make much of tea blending, 
but many of the wholesale dealers who 
have carefu'ly studi?rl i,he subject are be- 
yond doubt masters in their art. It fol- 
lows from the above that there is less in- 
ducement for the grocers to study the 
tea trade, and, on the other hand, an 
increasing necessity for them to do so, if 
they are to blend successfully the grow- 
ing varieties of tea, so as to meet the 
newer forms of competition. 

Grocers having a large connection and 
sufficient capital find no difficulty at all 
in coping with the new conditions. They 
can buy at the right moment, and hold 
their hundreds or thousands of pounds' 
worth of suitable stocks; they can blend 
tea successfully, keep it long enough in 
the bins to assimilate, study the tastes 
of their locality and defy external compe- 
tition. But all this has to be done on a 
sufficient scale and presupposes a rela- 
tively large capital and much skill and 
personal attention. 

At the present time the grocer is be- 
coming more a general storekeeper, sell- 
ing all non-perishable articles of food and 
drink. This tends to lock up an. increas- 
ing amount of capital, and to be a se- 
vere drain upon a man's time and abil- 
ities. Hence, the increasing practice of 
delivering goods ready for use to the re- 
tailer, and no longer requiring prepara- 
tion by him. The grocer does not now 
mix his yellow sugar or chop up his tit- 
lers, and the infinite variety of ready- 
packed or bottled goods in a shop would 
amaze the tradesman of a former gen- 
eration. 

For the reasons named above, the tea 



trade has begun to undergo a similar 
change with all but the larger buyers. 
The blending, and even the packing, are 
done for the grocer, and the tea is hand- 
ed to him ready for sale. 

We have more than once pointed out 
in these columns that it seems a serious 
error for grocers to sell tea in packets, 
and especially to act as agents for the 
sale for others. Tea fresh out of the chest 
must not only be cheaper and better than 
in packets, but it seems a short-sighted 
policy for the grocer to abandon his posi- 
tion as the direct caterer to the public 
and to become a servant to another. 
Besides, if packed tea at once becomes 
known by any special mark, it can just 
as well be sold by the draper, the book- 
seller, or the chemist, or, indeed, by any 
other retailer. Blended teas, however, 
stand in quite a different position. The 
grocer can buy and sell it while preserv- 
ing his complete independence of action 
and of position, and his hold upon the 
public. 

That portion of the trade who do not 
deal largely in tea, and a good many 
of those who do, but who do not find It 
worth their while to take much trouble, 
and to lock up touch capital on thia, 
branch of their trade, have, therefore, 
of late, taken to the purchase of blended 
tea, and there seems every possibility 
of the practice rapidly growing. Indeed, 
the demand from even large buyers for 
teas ready for use has been so great* 
for some time past that the leading Lon-. 
don wholesale dealers have been unable 
to meet the enquiry. The saving of 
money is to many a material consid- 
eration, for a man can buy his three or 
six or more chests, when and as he wants 
them ; instead of keeping in stock and in- 
curring rent upon hundreds of pounds' 
worth of tea at a time. Further, the 
turning of some part of his premises at 
intervals into a dust-bin and his men 
into dust-men, all comes to an end, if tea 
arrives ready blended. Again, done on 
a large scale, and by machinery, the 
blending process is necessarily cheaper, 
while the product is more even and bet- 
ter matured when dealt with and stored 
in greater masses. Above all, when the 
mixing is done by a dealer in a large 
way of business, with skilled tasters, 
large capital, and the command of the 
chief market in the world, the result is 
better than if a retailer, with much few- 
er opportunities, attempts the same 
thing. 

As was natural, the new demand for 
blended teas from the grocer was at 
first met, not by the larger and older 
wholesale houses— for the trade is emin- 
ently a conservative one— but by small- 
er dealers, who, having less to lose from 
any new departure, were more venture- 
some. The older and larger houses have 
now entered the field also. In these days 
every new want -has to be met, and while 
meeting as energetically as ever the old 
demand for original parcels by those who 
have the money, skill and time necessary 
to blend their own tea, there can be no 
reason why the large wholesale dealers 
should not sell blended tea to those who 
want it. The two classes of buyers are 
to *a considerable degree, it is true, dis- 
tinct, but that is no reason why the re- 
quirements of both should not be met 
from the same source. Some, no doubt, 
of the older houses may hesitate In pub- 
licly taking a new departure of this 
sort, but it is no secret in the trade that 
almost without exception they are glad 
enough to do the same thing privately. 
For out part we see no reason whatever 
for any secrecy about it.— Produce Mar- 
kets Eevlew. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



TRADE SALES. 

At Suckling's auction rooms, Toronto, on 
Tuesday afternoon the stock of J. Leaf, gen- 
eral storekeeper, Orillia, was sold to Chris- 
topher Moore of that town at 64c. on the 
dollar. 

The stock of J. F. Copland, the Toronto 
grocer, who assigned a short time ago, valu- 
ed at $10,000, was sold to R. Peters, Toron- 
to, at 66c. on the dollar. 

Dawson & Co's weekly fruit sale was held 
on Tuesday at 45 front St. east, in this city. 
They sold about 700 boxes of Florida 
oranges at prices ranging from $2.15 to $3, 
or averaging $2 65. Their Jamaica oranges 
averaged $2.25. About the same range of 
prices was obtained for lemons as for Florida 
oranges. About half the stock was taken 
by local retailers, the other half by whole- 
salers for out of town shipping. Their next 
sale will be held on Tuesday the 31st inst. 



CANADIAN PORK PACKERS. 

Hon. Messrs. iJowell and Angers have 
been waited upon by a deputation represent- 
ing the pork packing interests of Ontario. 
They represented that the pork packers of 
Canada are not able to obtain a continuous 
supply of hogs of Canadian growth for the 
purpose of keeping their factories running 
all the year round. In fact this point was 
recognized by the Government some years 
ago, and in order to meet the needs of the 
pork packing interest a concession was made 
by which they were enabled to import 
hogs from the United States in bond 
and ship the pork out of the country 
on the basis of sixty pounds for every 
hundred pounds live-weight on hogs up to 
200 pounds, and 65 pounds on hogs over 200 
pounds. About six months ago an inspector 
was sent through western Ontario on the 
report of the prevalence of hog cholera in 
the United States to see that the quarantine 
regulations were strictly enforced, and the 
object of the deputation to the Ministers last 
week was to urge some relaxation of these 
regulations in order to enable them to keep 
their establishments running during the 
winter. They promised that every care 
should be taken that the animals would be 
properly handled and be put through their 
establishments with the least possible delay. 
Both Ministers promised that the request 
would be taken into consideration. 



/fited the country very materially and they 

1 had the local and English markets for good 
butter. It was the custom of United States 
dairymen to ship cheese through Canada to 
England without having the place of manu- 
facture branded on the goods. People in 

} England were led to believe that this cheese 
was manufactured in Canada and sold more 
readily in consequence. He had a regula- 
tion passed by the Government to the effect 
that all United States cheese passing through 
Canada in bond for England must be brand 

v ed the product of the United States. 

H. P. Eckhardt & Co. are offering a ship- 
ment of oranges and lemons at low prices. 
Quality very fine. 

H. N. Baird, the retiring President of To- 
ronto Board of Trade, entertained the mem- 
bers of the Board of Trade Council and a 
few other friends at a banquet in the council 
room of the Board of Trade building on 
Tuesday evening. 

Brown & Rittenhouse expect a carload of 
Canada limed eggs to arrive to-day. The 
shipper has placed a stove in the car and a 
man in charge, and they will probably reach 
here free from frost, and no doubt will net a 
handsome margin notwithstanding the duty 
of 5c. per dozen. — N. Y. Commercial Bulletin 
(Monday). 

The ample premises of James A. Skinner 
& Co., on Wellington street, just west of Bay 
street, in this city, are stored with' some of 
the very finest goods carried in the stocks 
of wholesale dealers in crockery, porcelain, 
chinaware and glass goods. The seven 
floors of the large double building occupied 
by them are all needed to accommodate 
the large and varied stock. The appliances 
and equipment of the warehouse make the 
handling of vast bodies of goods in and 
out easy and rapid. They have two ele- 
vators — one for passengers, the other fo* 
freight — both run by electricity. Their ship- 
ping room opens on two well-paved lanes, 
and is very convenient for loading and un- 






/ Beforethe Dairymen's Associationat King- 

I ston, Mr. Taylor M. P. for Leeds, said that 

• /I through his efforts in Parliament he had got 

V^ a law passed preventing the manufacture of 

\ oleomargarine in Canada and the lmporta- 

I tion of it into the country. This had bene- 



loading. Their wares comprise all staple 
goods and many of the costly lines carried 
in special stocks as fancy goods. They 
show some treasures in French china and 
Doulton ware. A trip through their premises 
will open the eyes of buyers to some fine 
openings for trade. The house has dealt 
since 1850 with the Canadian trade and 
knows their wants. James A. Skinner & 
Co. came from Hamilton to this city nearly 
a year ago. 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 

Advertisements for assistants in retail and 
wholesale bouses, under this head, free. 

SALESMAN WANTED- A GOOD GROCERY 
hand ; one who is acquainted with general 
trade ; must be sober and well recommended ; 
no other need apply. Address C. Moore, Orillia. 

WANTED-BY NOV. 1ST-ENERGETIO, Ex- 
perienced salesman for general store ; well 
up in dry goods ; not afraid of work ; state 
salary; must have Al references. Address Rox 
342, Woodstock, Ont. 

BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Advertisements inserted under this heading 
one cent per word each insertion. 

WANTED— 1,COO,010 LBS. EVAPORATED AND 
sun dried apples, for which highest cash 
prices will be paid, delivered on cars. Special 
arrangements with large dealers. Send samples, 
stating quantity, etc., promptly to Michael Do vie 
& Co., Exporters and Jobbers, Evaporated and 
Dried Fruits, Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

GOOD BUSINESS CHANCE— FOR SALE— 
Gener.il Store, Building and Stock, Dwell- 
ing House and Grain Elevator, at Kippen, on 
London, Huron and Bruce R. R. Well situa- 
ted in an excellent section and enjoys a splendid 
patronage. For further particulars apply to D. 
Weisrnilier, Kippen, Out. 

SITUATION WANTED. 



WANTED SITUATION — BY YOUNG MAN, 
in the wholesale grocery and provision 
trade, as an assistant or traveller. Ten years 
experience in London, England. Will take 
small wages to commence. Good references. 
G. W. G. £>., Oak Lake, Man. 

YOUNG MAN WITH TEN YEARS EXPERI- 
ence in grocery lines wishes to secure posi- 
tion in general store in country. Good refer- 
ences. F. W. B , Canadian Gbocer. 



CriAS. SOUTHWELL * CO., w fto. 

ENCLISH JAMS, JELLIES, PRESERVES, AND MARMALADES. 

specialty in CLEAR JELLT ndRnrtLdbES 

» Scotch Home Made," j Made from Sevi „ e Oranges. 

" Perfection." J 

» Lemon Jelly Marmalade," «« flessina Lemons. 

PUT UP IN GLASS JARS SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR EXPORT. 



Chas. Southwell & Co. are also manufacturers of Candied Peels, Excelsior 
Packet Concentrated Jellies, etc. etc. All goods having 
their brand are exceptionally choice quality. 



Fill I PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. WORKS: D0<KHEAi>, LONDON, ENCLAlfD. 



It Pays to 

keep a 
Stock of 



PERRIN'S COUGH DROPS 



Write for quotations to 
D. S. PERRIN & CO., 
LONDON, CANADA; 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MANITOBA WHEAT FOR MACARONI 

The manufacture of macaroni is an in- 
dustry which might be carried on to 
good advantage in this part of Canada. 
Macaroni is manufactured from wheat, 
but only a particular class of wheat is 
suitable for the purpose, and our north- 
ern wheat should possess the required 
properties to a remarkable degree. Mac- 
aroni is made more largely in Italy than 
anywhere else, and on this account 
some may suppose that it requires a soft 
southern wheat to make macaroni. The 
fact is, exactly the opposite is the case. 
The Italian and French manufacturers 
bring their wheat from a province in 
Russia, which produces a very hard and 
flinty wheat. The flintier the wheat, the 
better the quality of macaroni produced. 
We should be able to produce a wheat 
here which would excel even the Rus- 
sian wheat in these properties. 

Large quantities of macaroni are con- 
sumed in various parts of the world, and 
the industry is an important one. It 
would therefore seem worth while en- 
quiring into the possibilities of estab- 
lishing a paying macaroni industry here. 
Manitoba wheat already has a wide re- 
putation, and, perhaps, with a little ef- 
fort, we might be able to secure the same 
reputation for Manitoba macaroni.— 
Winnipeg Commercial. 



PISTACHIO NUTS— WHAT MAY BE 
DONE WITH THEM. 

There are a great many good cooks 
and housekeepers who are entirely unac- 
quainted with pistachio nuts or the pos- 
sibilities in the way of decorative and 
delightful desserts that may be made 
with them. The true pistachio is of a 
pale and beautiful green color. The nut 
is usually sold in this country, shelled, at 
from 75 cents to $1 a pound. It may 
usually be found at the large downtown 
dealers in caterers' supplies ; but even 
our chief grocers do not often keep a sup- 
ply of these nuts in any but the bottled 
form. The nut is considerably sweeter 
and finer in flavor than the almond, but 
is also more oily, and for this reason it 
easily spoils and becomes unfit for use. 
It is much safer to buy these nuts in a 
loose condition by the pound than in a 
bottle, for one can test them and see if 
they are fit for use. The pistachio nut is 
very highly esteemed among the Turks, 
who use it not only for sweetmeats and 
confections, but are said to employ them 
in garnishing and stuffing meats. 

A pistachio ice cream is one of the most 
delicious of deserts, especially when serv- 
ed a la neapolitaine, with a layer of 
pale strawberry and one of vanilla. No 
cream is more easily made. Taking a 
quarter of a pound of fine dried pista- 
chio nuts, blanch them, and test them 
carefully to see if they are sweet and 
sound. Put them on a tin plate in the 
oven and let them become crisp and deli- 
cately brown. This will take about sev- 
en or eight minutes. As soon as they are 
done, put them in a mortar with two 
tablespoonfuls of granulated sugar and 
pound them fine. Mix a large cup of 
granulated sugar with the yolks of six 
eggs, add a quart of boiling milk very 
gradually, beating it in as you do so. 
turn the mixture into a porcelain lined 
pail and stir it continually till it is just 
scalded up. Then add the pounded pistac- 
chio, beating it in carefully, and finally 
a quart of sweet cream. Beat the mix- 



ture well and set it away to cool ; when 
It is cold, and ten drops of spinach green, 
The French vegetable colors, put up by 
Breton, of Paris ,are generally used by 
confectioners for this purpose. It is not 
safe to trust any more ordinary make, 
though, if you wish, you can make this 
spinach green yourself. It is, however, 
considerable trouble to do so. 

When the cream is all ready, put it 
in the freezer and freeze it carefully. It 
is, of course, necessary to success in mak- 
ing an ice cream to remove the cover. 
After the beater has been turned for four 
or five minutes, scrape off the frozen 
cream that adheres to the bottom and 
sides of the freezer and beat it into the 
liquid cream in the centre. Then cover it 
up, turn the beater for about four min- 
utes longer, and repeat the process of 
scraping the cream from the bottom and 
sides and beating it in with the rest. Cov- 
er it again, and after turning it five min- 
utes more it will usually be frozen 
enough to remove the beater. Now 
scrape the cream from the sides and bot- 
tom once more and beat it vigorously 
and thoroughly, working it up and down 
to press it into every part of the can, if 
it is to be left in the can ; or into every 
part of the mould, if it is packed in 
a fancy mould. Press a sheet of clean 
white tea-paper evenly over the top of 
the cream and put on the cover of the can 
or mould. In the case of a mould, it is 
well enough to seal the cover with a 
little butter or tallow, which, however, 
must be scraped off carefully before the 
cover is lifted, to prevent it falling into 
the cream. If the cream is packed in the 
can of the freezer, all that is necessary 
is to cork up the cover. 

A Bavarian cream may also be made 
with pistachio nuts, which is a delight- 
ful and delicate dessert. Blanch, dry and 
crisp in the oven a quarter of a pound 
of pistachio kernels in the same way 
you do for ice cream. Soak a quarter 
of a box of gelatine or half an ounce of 
isinglass in a gill of water for two 
hours. Meantime whip a pint of rich 
cream until it is a stiff froth. Then 
drain it carefully. There will be about 
half a cup of cream which will drain 
away and remain liquid. Take this li- 
quid cream, scald it, and pour it over 
the soaked gelatine or isinglass. Add al- 
so about five drops of spinach green, only 
enough to give a very delicate color. 
Mix the dissolved isinglass or gelatine 
with the pounded pistachio kernels ; add 
about four tablespoonfuls of sugar, and 
pour all these ingredients gradually in- 
to the beaten cream, which should be set 
in a pan of ice. It is best to have tyw,o 
persons to do this, one to heat the cream, 
while the other pours the ingredients in 
gradually. Continue to heat the cream 
until it begins to thicken, and then pour 
it into the mould and set it away to be- 
come hard. It requires a little judgment 
and experience to know just when to 
pour the cream into the mould. If it is 
done before the gelatine begins to show- 
its thickening power, the cream will rise 
to the top of the mould. If it is beaten 
too long it will not form a compact mass 
in the mould, and will be likely to crack 
when it is turned out. 

Pistachio nuts may also be salted in 
the same way that almonds are salted. 
They may be cut into strips and used in 
connection with candied and sliced limes, 
strips of angelica and candied Malaga 
grapes to decorate a mould of Wamo 
mange. Wherever the almond is used the 
pistachio may usually be substituted, 
though it is not worth while to use this 
more expensive nut in macaroons or any 
baked dish, where the delicate flavor 
would be destroyed by cooking.-»Ex. 



SANITARY GROCERS. 

The fact is continually being developed 
that the retail grocer has it in his power to 
do great good and get paid for it as he goes 
along, by calling the attention of his custom- 
ers to the healthfulness of certain products 
that he keeps in stock. The grocer who 
reads and thinks (and every grocer should 
take time to do both) will find that his vari- 
ous cereal foods, fruits, vegetables, etc., pos- 
sess rare medical virtues and peculiar heal- 
ing and sanitary powers, far superior in 
many cases to drugs ; while as accessories 
to health, and in relation to palatable diet 
or nutriment, they are always of service. 

Often some of the most seemingly trifling 
substances have virtues that the thoughtless 
seldom ascribe to them. The latest and 
most simple of articles the retailer daily 
handles is chewing gum, the gum trade 
having reached enormous proportions. Chew- 
ing gum (setting aside what may be the 
abuse of the chewing gum habit) is proving 
highly serviceable in some cases of dyspep- 
sia, by exciting the salivary glands to action. 

Recently the fact has become apparent 
that chewing gum is serviceable in feverish 
conditions of the system and plays a part 
not to be despised in regulating the salivary 
secretions. 

Dr. R. I. Bond, of Hartshorn, I. T., writes 
to the Medical Record: "The salivary 
glands play quite an important part in con- 
tinued fevers, yet they are not considered in 
thetreaiment of the case. One of the first 
and most important restrictions in the 
patient's dietary is to drop all solid food 
from the list at the physician's first request, 
and just then the salivary glands begin to 
lapse into a torpid condition which very 
often results in an inflammation and, finally, 
suppuration, and that disagreeable dryness 
of the tongue and fauces so uncomfortable 
to the patient. For the relief of this trouble 
I have found nothing of so much importance 
as some nice form of aromatic chewing gum, 
which relieves the thirst and dry mouth, im- 
proves the appetite and digestion, and re- 
strains nausea, if any." — Detroit Herald of 
Commerce. 

The shipping circular of a British Colum- 
bia company says : As 1892 was a fourth, or 
" off" year a small pack of salmon was anti- 
cipated and this has proved to be the case, 
as there were packed about 86,000 cases less 
than last year, 181,000 less than in 1891. As 
the shortage is general along the coast, the 
salmon market has been entirely relieved 
from previous excessive stocks and is now 
in a healthier condition than it has been for 
a lon£ time, while prices are good and show 
an upward tendency. The entire pack of 
the Province has been exported at an un- 
usually early date, and stocks on hand will 
barely suffice for local consumption. The 
coming season, therefore, will open with 
very fair prospects of an adequate pack, and 
a good market for it, at satisfactory prices. 



PARAGON 
CANADIAN 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 



jwmuAR's . . 



Cheese 



, , Ingersoll, Canada . , 



Millar's Canadian (Ingersoll) Paragon, Cheese. Finest 
article in the market. Put up in jars,' hermetically sealed. 



DAVIDSON <£ HAY. T°"°nto 



SOLE 

AGENTS 




^HIGHLAND . . 
EVAPORATED 
" 71 CREAM 



A NEW SOURCE OF 

REVENUE 

TO THE GROCERS 



t[nsU'eetene& 



Add two parts of water to one of Evaporated Cream 
and it will answer perfectly for Dairy Cream. 
Dilute it with three parts of water, and you have an 
excellent quality of milk. Always pare and taintless. 



Prepared by . 



FOR SALE BY ALL WHOLESALE GROCERS 



Helvetia |V|ilk (ondemsiMc (o., 



highland, ill 
u. s. a. 



WEIGHT & COPP. Ontario Agents. 

Toronto 



L. H. DOBBIN, Montreal, 

Quebec Agent. 



K 


T 


lil B^ 1 


K 


■ .1 


PTn iiiiin 



IT IS A GREAT SUCCESS. 

Grocers from all parts of the country report that it is a quick seller 
from the start. Order a case from your jobber at once. Every cus- 
tomer you sella bottle to will thank you after using it. Delicious 
Clam Broth can be made from it in one minute, with Hot water. 
Three sizes, retails at 25c, 50c, and 90c, in bottles only. Order from 

James Turner & Co., Hamilton, Ont., or write E. S. Burn- 
ham Company, "Manufacturers," 120 Gansevort St., New York, U.S.A. 

R. H. HOWARD & CO., Toronto. ROBT. MOORE, Travelling Agent, London, Ont. 



ARE THE FINEST QUALITY AND GUARANTEED PURE. 

BATTY^CO'S 




PICKLES . . . 
SAUCES . . . . 
MARMALADES 



JAMS 

;^ and — 

' JELLIES 



A TRIAL ORDER WILL SATISFY THE BUYER 
THAT BATTY'S ARE THE BEST. :::::: 

123 and 125 F1NSBURY PAVEMENT, I 

LONDON, ENGLAND. | 




WRIGHT & COPP, 



D S° s N TORONTO. 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



DO NOT BUY POOR GOODS. 

In these days of intense competition 
the country is flooded by catch-penny an- 
nouncements of goods for sale far below 
the regular market for such commodi- 
ties. It is a great temptation to dealers 
to handle such.as the profits are so much 
larger. But, like all temptations, they 
should be resolutely put behind you. The 
very fact that this is a period of such 
close competition makes it impossible to 
offer goods of standard quality and full 
weight at much less than fair market 
prices. It is nearly always a foregone 
conclusion that goods offered at these 
tempting prices are faulty in some re- 
spect. Either they are light weight, they 
are old and lacking in strength and 
freshness, or they are adulterated. 

We are not looking at this question 
from the standpoint of honesty, for the 
thoroughly honest dealer does not come 
within the reach of the temptation. The 
man who wants to do the fair thing by 
his customers will not handle goods on 
which the margin of profit is too large. 
It is from the standpoint of common 
sense that this matter must be discussed. 
The man of good sense is the man who re- 
alizes that his neighbors are generally as 
well supplied with this quality as he is. 
The most foolish man is the one who 
thinks all the rest of the world are his 
dupes. There may be a large profit in 
selling poor or light-weight goods— so 
long as the selling can be carried on. 
But the time comes when your customers 
find you out. The careful housewife 
soon learns that the goods she is using 
are not rendering the service she expects 
of them. The results are not what she 
desires. Her dishes are inferior in spite 
of all her care, or the purchases she made 
a week ago are not going to go as far 
as she knows they ought. It is a sore 
disappointment to a woman to find her 
bread bad, or her cake heavy, or her 
dessert unpalatable, or her tea or coffee 
taste like " dishwater"— to use a strong 
expression. It is also a great annoyance 
to her to find her money is not sufficient 
to make ends meet, as used to be the 
case. She seeks the cause and discovers 
it is your light-weight goods or in your 
adulterated stuff. Then she goes some- 
where else for her supplies, and as your 
best customers drop off you will find the 
big profits made on your cheap goods 
will not make you rich after all. In time 
your shelves become cumbered up with a 
lot of cheap trash which no one will buy, 
and then all your profits on what you 
have sold are more than offset. Your 
neighbor on the other side of the street 
has been dealing with the old house 
which always sails good, fresh, clean, 
full -weight goods, and he has all the 
trade of the town and is prosperous. 

Be very careful of the seductive story 
of the salesman or circular that profess- 
es to sell you goods away below the mars 
ket. The conditions of trade will not 
permit such practices. Ii you listen to 
the temptation to buy goods on which 
the profits are so unreasonable, you will 
be imposed upon, and you will find some 
difficulty in playing the game on your 
customers. It is not the same game eith- 
er. You buy the stuff because it is cheap. 
You propose to sell it at full prices. 
Otherwise, it is of no account to you. 
But beware of expecting to humbug your 
customers". Barnum said that the Ameri- 
can people delighted to be humbugged. 
But do not try to carry out this prln, 
clple in the grocery stpre. The people are 
in the main very intelligent, and do not 
enjoy at all being humbugged into pay- 
ing for a pound when you get only four- 



teen ounces, or into eating meals spoiled 
by poor materials, which cost as much 
as good. 

A trustworthy wholesale house will 
never resort to these Cheap John tricks. 
Such houses will charge fair market 
prices for what you buy ; they will give 
you full weight of good standard qual- 
ity. Your customers will get out of these 
goods full service and satisfactory re- 
sults in the kitchen, and as long as you 
stick to the honest house your customers 
will stick to you and bring new ones to 
your doors by telling their neighbors of 
the satisfaction they enjoy in dealing 
with a storekeeper who knows how to 
buy goods and sell them at a reasonable 
price. *Et is a great satisfaction for a 
housewife to feel assured that whatever 
she orders from her grocer will be good, 
and that she will not be put to the mor- 
tification of having her efforts in the 
kitchen rendered abortive, or of suffer- 
ing the equal mortification of having to 
send goods back to the store, and be al- 
ways complaining to her grocer that he 
is not sending her what she wants. 

The largest profits are made by slow 
and sure steps, by daily enlarging your 
business, keeping every customer who 
comes to your store, and continually 
adding new ones. -Grocer and Country 
Merchant. 



thousands of people pass through life 
dssatisfied with themselves and blaming 
fate for what they themselves are re- 
sponsible for.— Ex. 



HOW FRENCH SARDINES 
PACKED. 



ARE 



LAYING IT TO LUCK. 

It is a very common failing for many 
people to ascribe their success of fail- 
ure in any business or undertaking to 
what they are pleased to call luck, and 
at this season of tflb year when so 
many changes are made in business 
houses, employes may be heard to as- 
cribe their condition to luck, just as 
though their actions and endeavors 
had nothing to do with it. Observation 
shows that these devotees of the luck 
system make it an excuse for their indol- 
ence and non-progressiveness. In their 
superficial manner of looking at events 
they have neglected those obvious condi- 
tions which a more close examination 
wuld have revealed as the true cause of 
any person's condition. 

Thus two young men may start in life 
with apparently equal abilities and pros- 
pects. One will succeed in amassing a 
competence, while the other barely man- 
ages, as the saying is, to keep soul and 
body together. If the course of life fol- 
lowed by these 2 men is closely studied 
the result to which each has come will be 
seen to be due to the effort, or lack of 
effort, shown by each, and there would 
be no recourse to luck to explain the dif- 
ference in their conditions. It will prob- 
ably be found that one valued present 
ease and pleasure too much to make any 
sacrifice for the future ; He lived only 
for the good each day might bring him. 
As time passed and he compared his con- 
dition with that of the other man, then 
it was that his failure was laid to luck, 
and the success of the other to the same 
convenient term. 

While there may be many strange 
events in men's lives which seem to need 
chance as an explanation, it will general- 
ly be found that each individual has been 
the arbiter of his own fortune. It Is a 
failing of human nature to shift respon- 
sibility upon others ; and from the time 
of the man who said the woman did it, 
down to the present, the same sort of 
excuses are rendered. And in the moral 
world the same scapegoat system is prac- 
ticed ,and many a sin is laid to the devil 
by those who need not go outside of- 
themselves for the true source ; they de- 
sired to do bad deeds, but did not care to 
shoulder the responsibility. No doubt 



In a paper upon Finisterre, read by F. 
S. Dellenbaugh before the American Geo- 
graphical Society, he describes the sar- 
dine industry as it is practiced off Pont- 
aven on the coast of Brittany. At times, 
he says, there are as many as 1,200 fish- 
ing boats collected at this point, where 
the sardine, while on its northward jour- 
ney, attains its most desirable size for 
taking and packing. The boats are about 
thirty feet long, entirely open, except 
for a short deck at the stern, and carry- 
ing two masts that can readily be taken 
down. The net, about 20 feet long and 
six or eight feet broad, is weighted on 
one long edge, and buoyed with cork 
floats on the other, so that when it is 
in the water behind the boat it assumes 
an upright position like a wall, and in 
this position is towed through the water 
by one end as fast as the boat moves 
slowly along. The captain mounts the 
little deck at the stern with a bucket of 
bait called rong, the eggs and codfish, 
under one arm, and his practiced eye 
ranges the water. When he discovers the 
proximity of the fish he scatters a little 
of the rong on one side of the net and 
they rise in a school to take it. This is 
the critical moment. He throws a quan- 
tity on the opposite side, and the fish, 
making a dart for it, are entangled in 
the meshes. When the sardines are num- 
erous, the boat does not halt to take 
the net on board ; by means of a certain 
pull the meshes are tightened, and, with 
a buoy to make it, it is cast off and left 
until a full catch is made. Another net 
is put out, and the operation is repeated 
till all the nets are used. 

Then comes the picking up and ex- 
traction of the fish, the latter work be- 
ing performed with great care, because 
handling the fish injures them. The net 
is caught up at the ends and see-sawed 
till all the fish drop into the bottom of 
the boat, where they remain until the ar- 
rival in port. There the fish are counted 
by two hundreds into coarse baskets, 
and dipped in the water beside the boat 
to free them from loose scales and other 
matter. Thence they are carried to the 
factories, and thrown upon long, low 
tables, on each side of which is a row 
of women and girls, who, with a short 
knife, prepare them for the salt vats, 
where they remain for two hours. After 
that they are placed in coarse baskets 
and given a bath of sea water under a 
pump. Then they are put to dry in the 
open air on wire racks. When the fish 
begin to shrivel the racks are taken to 
the oil room, where four or five tanks 
of oil are constantly boiling. Each rack 
is plunged for a moment or two into 
hot oil, and then set aside to drip, after 
which the fish are selected and carefully 
laid in tin boxes of various sizes. 

When the box is full it is passed along 
to the oil tap, where the sbpace remain- 
ing is filled with oil. The box is now 
ready for sealing, and passes along to 
the solderer. After the soldering, a hole 
is punched in the cover to let out the im- 
prisoned air and immediately closed with 
solder .Next the cans are placed in a huge 
iron crate and lowered into tanks of boil- 
ing water. If there is still air in the can 
it will explode or bulge out, and the 
trouble can be corrected before the final 
packing in wooden boxes for export to 
all parts of the world. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 



The pure INDIAN TEA of 

KEMBLE & CO., 

Calcutta, India, 

Is "Second to None" for Purity, Strength, 
and Flavor. TRY IT. 

A. DAVIDSON, Xp^entative. 
48 Front St. East, Toronto. 



Todhunter, Mitchell & Co., 

DIRECT IMPORTERS OF 

HIGH GRADE COFFEES, 

Old Government Java, Arabian Mocha, Plantation Ceylon, Maracaibo 

and Santos. 

Grocers draw trade by selling their FAVORITE EXCELSIOR BLEND. 
RELIABLE ROASTING BY PATENTED PROCESS. TORONTO* 



Buy Pure Gold 
Baking Powder 



It has no equal for strength and purity and con- 
tains nothing but the finest quality of pure Cream 
of Tartar and Bi-Carbonate of Soda. .... 





It gives the best satisfaction to both dealer and 
consumer. 



PURE GOLD 
M'FG CO. 
Toronto 



S. A. Van Dam & Co 



37 Old Corn Exchange, Manchester, 

and 



23 Mathew Street, Liverpool, England. 
Solicit Consignments of 

Bacon, Butter, Lard, Eggs, Cheese, 
and Canned Goods. 



LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE. 



FIRM FOUNDED 1850. 



" REFERENCES "--Bank of British North America, Toronto ; and Manchester and Salford Bank, 

Manchester, Eng. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



H 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

SALES MADE OR PENDING. 

John Dunbar, general merchant, Hope- 
well, N.S., has sold out. 

The fruit stock of E. A. McEachren, Vic- 
toria, B.C., is offered for sale. 

The general store stock of John McCona- 
chie, Honeywood, Ont., is sold. 

The crockery stock of J. A. Naud, Mon- 
treal, is offered for sale by tender. 

J. & W. Stewart, fish and general mer- 
chants, St. John's, Nfld., are closing up. 

D. Weismiller, general merchant, Kippen, 
Ont., advertises his business there for sale 

The general store stock of Griffin & Co., 
Ridgetown, Ont., was offered for sale on 
Monday. 

W. Milligan, general merchant, King 
Creek, Ont., has sold out and gone to the 
North West. 

Price & McKay, general merchants, Este- 
van, Man., have sold out to Lindsay & Pat- 
terson of Stonewall. 

John D. Buchanan, general merchant, 
Lake Megantic, Que., offers his stock for 
sale on the 31st inst. 

La Generale Compagnie des Bazars, gen- 
eral merchants, Montreal, advertise to sell 
by auction on the 30th inst. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Purcell & Stevenson, grocers, Halifax, 
have dissolved. 

Morse & Thomas, general merchants, 
Berwick, N.S., have dissolved. 

A partnership is registered of the Societe 
de Fabrication de Beurre, Ste. Foye, Que. 

J. Curtis Wilson, general merchant, Kemp- 
ton, N.S., has registered consent for his wife 
Bessie to do business. 
(* Fred. R. E. Dearborn has been admitted 
partner into the firm Dearborn & Co., spice 
grinders, St. John, N.B. 

Chas. H. Denton, general merchant, Ross- 
way, N.S., has registered consent for his 
wife, Almira J. Denton, to do business in 
her own name. 

FIRES. 

The Caledonia Milling Co., Caledonia 
Ont., is burnt out. 

Hull & Old, grain and flour merchants, 
Caledonia, Ont., are burnt out. 

Duncan Macdonald, grocer, Manitowan- 
ing, Ont., is partially burnt out. 

A. & R. Atkinson, dry goods merchants 
and grocers, Caledonia, Ont., are burnt out. 

Reynolds & Co., general merchants, Mani- 
towaning, Ont., are burnt out. Partially in- 
sured. 

Lyon Silverman, manufacturer of flavoring 
extracts, Montreal, is partially burnt out. 
Insured. 

DEATHS. 

John Ewart, general merchant, Medicine 
Hat, N.W.T., is dead. 

E. Strickland, Sr., general merchant, 
Buckingham, Que,, is dead. 



DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES 

J. A. Bernier, grocer, Quebec, has assigned. 

C. G. .Beaulieu, trader, Levis, Que., has 
assigned. 

J. D. Cameron, general merchant, Mahon, 
N.S., has assigned. 

R. A. Troyer, general merchant, Oxbow, 
Man., have assigned. 

Joseph Girard, general merchant, Moose 
Creek, Ont., has assigned. 

Edward Bambrick, grocer, Ottawa, has 
assigned to Peter Larmouth. 

D. R. Thompson, general merchant, 
Sunny Brae, N.S., has assigned. 

Joseph A. Riopelle, tea merchant, Mont- 
real, has assigned to Bilodeau & Renaud. 

The affairs of P. Lallier, general merchant, 
St. Jerome, Que , are being investigated. 

P. & L. Tessier, commission merchants in 
fish, oil, etc., St. John's, Nfld., have sus- 
pended. 

Smith & Jones, general merchants, 
Mount Albert, Ont., have called a meeting 
of their creditors. 

F. X. Berthiaume, general merchant, St., 
Genevieve, Que., has assigned to Amedee 
Lamarche, Montreal. 

The stock in trade in the estate of C. L. 
Ingraham, general merchant, Windsor, N.S , 
has been assigned at 35 percent, of cost. 



HANDLING OF ROLL BUTTER. 

In fall and winter when many creameries 
are not in operation their patrons churn 
again their cream, and those that cannot 
make enough butter to fill a tub with one 
churning make up the butter in "rolls," says 
the Produce Trade Reporter. The trouble 
with roll butter, however, is that it often is 
not properly handled and packed, and from 
lack of knowledge in this particular the but- 
ter assumes a ragged and untidy appear- 
ance, and in consequence sells at a low 
price. 

If roll butter could be sent to market in 
perfect form it would not unfrequently com- 
mand two to five cents per pound more than 
when packed solid. Each roll must be 
wrapped in a piece of white muslin or cheese 
capping, and it should be large enough to 
cover the roll entirely. The muslin must be 
washed in warm water to remove the starch, 
then soaked in strong brine and put on the 
roll wet. Never wrap butter in paper, as the 
paper will stick to the butter and damage the 
appearance. 

It is impossible to send roll butter to mar- 
ket in good order without wrapping it in 
muslin, and no matter what the muslin may 
cost, it will more than pay the cost in the 
increased price the rolls thus packed will 
bring. 

For packing use new tubs or hardwood 
boxes, but no pine boxes, as this wood has a 
tendency to affect and flavor the butter. In 
very cold weather half-barrels or kegs will 
do equally well, but whole barrels are too 
large and not easily handled ; besides, the 



weight crushes the rolls. In packing in 
hardwood boxes and kegs the end intended 
for the head should be turned down, then 
take out the bottom head and cut a piece of 
white muslin the size of the head and place 
it on the bottom of the head of the package, 
which will be the head when opened. 

Commence to pack the smallest rolls first, 
taking care to pack each roll on its smaller 
end. The rolls should be, as much as possi- 
ble, of uniform color and size. Do not pack 
the light and fresh made with those that have 
been colored or with old stock. Be careful 
and select rolls that will pack tight, so there 
will be no space for the rolls to shake about; 
continue packing in this way until the pack- 
age is almost full ; then shake the same well 
to settle the rolls, and now fill up as snug as 
possible. 

In filling up the last layer pack the rolls 
on their ends if possible ; but if there is not 
room enough it will not matter if they are 
packed on their sides, but they must be pack- 
ed tight and entirely fill the package. Be- 
fore heading the package sprinkle on a small 
quantity of strong brine, and cover the last 
layer with a piece of muslin, and then turn 
the package over two or three times so as to 
let the brine work in between the rolls. 



HIS BUSINESS METHODS. 

A well known Minneapolis wholesale 
dealer thus describes his business methods : 
" On the principle that half the failures come 
from this infernally foolish anxiety to spread 
out and overdo, I've cut my garment accord- 
ing to my cloth, and by so doing gained the 
confidence of the banks and men who after- 
wards became my backers. It's a great 
thing to be able to discount all obligations, 
and so far as possible, I've done it, but when 
I couldn't, I've watched my purchases, and 
checked up the sales with a carefulness that 
— well, that you quill drivers never could 
imagine. My experience in selling to others 
has been that hell is paved with the promises 
of slow-paying customers. Unless from 
some unusual cause, they're generally a 
slip-shod lot. The man who discounts 
his bills buys far more cheaply, and, of 
course, sells on a better margin. Another 
thing, every merchant should take a com- 
plete and careful inventory of his stock at 
least once a year, though twice is better, and 
draw up a statement as a standard of com- 
parison with the record of former years. In 
this way he can detect the weak elements, 
and correct or do away with the/n. I be- 
lieve firmly in insurance, no matter what the 
rates may be. It the risk is great for the 
companies, iHs equally great for the owner, 
and a business that can not carry a good in- 
surance might better be given up. One 
other point, I advise those who deal with us 
to let their goods stay on the shelves rather 
than sell them to irresponsible or slow-pay- 
ing customers. In the one case you have 
something to show for time and money ex- 
pended, in the other you have less than 
nothing. — Ex. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



83 



SITUATION WANTED. 
MARATIME PROVINCES. 



WANTED— A SITUATION AS TRA- 
veller for Provisions or Groceries, 
also side lines. Apply care 
15 93 B., this office. 

COWAN'S 
OCOAS «£ 
HOCOLATES 

Are Standard, and sold by 
all grocers. 

Famous 
Boneless Codfish 

NEW and GENUINE. 

NOW ARRIVING. 
Packed in assorted Boxes, 5-lbs., 10-lbs., 
20-lbs, and 40-lbs., containing 1 and 2 lb. 
Bricks, also 

Skinless Codfish 

Packed in 100 lb. Boxes, Whole Fish. 

Delightful thick Codfish Steak. 

Orders can be filled at short notice after this. 

Stewart, Munn & Co., 
MONTREAL. 



GROCERS ! 

Samples of our new lines of Brooms are 
now in our travellers hands. 

It will pay you to handle them, and we 
particularly call your attention to our brands. 



Extra Fine. 



Fine. 



Select. 



Imperial, 
Victoria, 
Standard, 
Leader, ri ?p^- 

,jx We also manufacture all kinds of Special 
Brooms for Floor, Yard, Stable, Warehouse, 
and Factory use. 

CURLING BROOMS ON BAMBOO 
HANDLES OUR SPECIALTY. 

Our best grades have seperate Paper 
Cover on each Broom. 

SEND FOR NEW PRICE LIST. 

GHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers, TORONTO. • 




It fieVeF 
Varies . . 




Sold only in Cans by the Live 

Wholesale and Retail 

Trade 



and Manufactured by 




The Haniilton S^e 

AND (OFFEE (o . . . 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




T PACKING CO., 



IMZOZEsTTIRIE^IU 

BEEF AND PORK PACKERS, 



Carers of the Celebrated C.M.P Brand of Smoked Meat, Sugar cured 
extra-flavored Hams and Bacon. 

Corr.pressed Corned Beef. Ox and Lunch Tongue. 

Pure Lard a Specialty. 



WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



Condensed tDinee ^Vleat. 



Delicious Mince Pies 

every day in the 

year. 

Handled by retailer 
as shelf or counter 
goods. No waste. 
Gives general satis- 
faction. 

Sells at all seasons. 

Will not ferment in 
warm weather. 



»M0UNT F0Rr«r» EB ' 0R "'"That 
W4UR.IF Tnn T ! ' AD0 *UTTLr 

a"uV.° u ;;/sW t,st "« 

■tfSSstes 



wm 



The best and cheapest 
Mince Meat on 
Earth. Price re- 
duced to {12.00 
per gross, net. 

H. WETHEY, St. Catharines, Ont. 



COFFEE 



z 
< 



HAVE YOU the puffs of smoke issuing from 
NOTICED . their stove front all day? What 
do you think that smoke comes from ? Why — a 
fire! That fire runs their coffee roaster. A new 
thing for a retail grocer. The latest kink ! It 
means not only the best coffee but always fresh 
roasted , . 



67 Pearl Street, New York 



The Hungerford Go. 



MACHINERY 



0) 

D 

O 

m 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




A GREAT HIT !^^ * 

Adams' Tutti Frutti Auto- 
matic Girl Sign Box. Works 
by clock work. A big at- 
traction for your window. 
Send for Circular. 

ADAMS' & SONS CO., 

I 1 and 13 Jarvls St, 
TORONTO, ONT. 





THE KING OFBbACKINGS^^ 

THE F. F. DALLEY CO. OF HAMILTON, L TD 



:e. zBZRcrwTsr &c sonars 

7 Garrick Street, London, England, and at 26 Rue Bergere, Paris 

BOOT PREPARATIONS 

SOLD EVERYWHERE. 




MELTONIAN 

BLACKING 

(A* used In the Royal 
Household) 

Benders the Boots soft, dur- 
able and waterproof. 




MELTONIAN 
CREAM 

(white or black) 

For Renovating all 

kinds of Glace Eid 

Boots and Shoes. 



i ROYAL ; 

Lutetian Cream 



E;.Brown&Son 

it -their ! 
Mcitcnian BiAJfi^r. 

MANUfACTORV 

'CarrickS'LonoonWC 



ROYAL 

LUTETIAN 

CREAM 

The best for Cleaning 
and Polishing Rus- 
sian and Brown Lea- 
ther Boots, Tennis 
Shoes, etc. 




NONPAREIL 

DE GUICHE 

Parisian Polish 

For Varnishing Dress Boots 
and Shoes is more elastic and 
easier to use than any other 



Cough Drops 

Unequalled for coughs and sore 
throat. 

Packed in elegant 5 lb. Tins or Bottles. 
Prices on application. 



Wm. Paterson & Son 

BRANTFORD. 

[HE "MOST POPULAR" BLACK LEAD. 

THE " MOST REMARKABLE " POLISH. 



Messrs. Salomon & Phillips, 33 Spruoe St., New York, 8oi. Agent, for Canada an 



d U.S.A. 



PLEASE ASK BOB AJTB- USB OKLT . 

NIXEY'S SPECIALITIES OF STERLING VALUE. 



Nixeys 

[Lead 




Hundreds of Testimonials from all parts, including 

Her Majesty's, Royal Buckingham Palace. 
HIOSBBT HXHIHmON HONOURS. 




FOR BRIGHT. SILVERY, QUICK POLISH 
STOVES A 8RATES, << 

ALWAYS ISE «JT\ 

^ PLUMBABO" 






STOVE POLISH. 



Always Bright & Beautiful. 
In Large Packets Id. te 2d. each. 



Uh only for Laundry PurpoKi, producing the be.t result.. 




NIXEY'S 
BLUE 



"SOHO 

SQUARE 



THE PUREST-BEST-NO SEDIMENT, 

Quit halt thm p.ual quajititt 

BIOOH.D. 

Sight 1-oz. square, in Box for Od. 
Of all Grocers and Oilmen ; or write to 
13, SOHO SQUARE. LONDON, ENGLAND 



Tor Knives, Forks, Brass 

and Steel Work, &c, &c. 
Won't Wear the Blades like 
others. ( 

6d. and Is. Tins. 

NIXEY'S 

^ KNIFE POLISH. 




OF ALL STOREKEEPERS EVERYWHERE. 
Wholesale: W. G. NIXBY, London, England. 



Canadian representatives: 

IYIp. W. Matthews, 7 Richmond St 

East, Toronto. 
Mr. Charles Gyde, 33 St. Nicholas 

St,, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 



^mmnynrtt?mnynmrmmmnfmiffmn?nfm^fmnyttfmnfnfnmfn?^r^r??f!tfttmrnftrrnftmtmrnr^ 



Bagter's 

Nonpareil Jellies, 

All Flavors 



2& 
7®Z 



Bagter's 

Jams, Jellies, 

Marmalade 



IMPORTANT 



Having bought out the Stock and goodwill of Messrs. 
Tees, Wilson & Co, we intend giving our customers 
some bargains during the next two weeks. Special value 
in Syrups See our travellers before buying, or write us 
for samples and quotations , 



CAVERHILL ROSE HUGHES k CO. r Montrea 



^iUii4UU»iiUMM»Ui»ilUiUuiUiiUUiiWttiUiil»«iUiiWUitiiiUUiit«iii«U»iUWWWiilWiiUUWWWiiiiiiWUWJK 



THE CANADIAN GROCER PRICES CURRENT. 



Tobonto, Jan. 26, 1893. 

This list is corrected every Thurs- 
day. The prices are solicited for pub- 
lication, and are for such qualities 
and quantities as are usually ordered 
by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt 
pay are generalij obtainable at lower 
prices. 

All quotations in this department 
are under the direct control of the 
Editor, and are not paid for or doc- 
tored by any manufacturing or lob- 
bing house unless given under their 
name ; the right being reserved to 
exclude such hrms as uo not furnish 
reliable information. 

BAKING POWDER. 

pdbe gold. per doz 
|5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

|4 lb. cans 1 doz. 

I in case 16 00 

*^2H lb. cans, 1 and 

2 doz in case 10 50 

1 16 oz. cane, 1. 2 and 

4 doz. incase.... 4 60 
|l2 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 70 

|8 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 2 40 

6 oz. cars, 2 and 4 

doz in case 1 90 

4 oz. cans, 4 and 6 doz in case ... 1 25 
Per doz 

Dunn's No. 1, in tins 2 00 

" 2 '• 75 

Cook's Gem, in 1 lb pkgs 81 75 

" " 7 oz pkgs 85 

" " 2oz " 40 

" " 51b tins 65 

' " bulk, per lb.... 12 

Per doz 

Empire, 5 dozen 4 oz cans $0 75 

f ' 4 8 " 1 15 

" 2 16 " 2 00 

" >4 51b cans 9 00 

bulk, per lb 15 




COOK' 8 FRIEND. 



(in Paper Packages.; Per doz 
81ze 1, in»and4doz boxes... 82 40 

" 10,in4 doz boxes 2 10 

•' 8,in6 " 80 

" 12,in6 " 7C 

" 3,in4 " 45 

Pound tins, 3 oz in case 8 0c 

12 oz tins, 3 oz in case 8 40 

5 oz tins, 4 " 1 10 

5 lb tins, V4 " 14 00 

Ocean Wave, H. lb, 4 doz cases 75 

OCEAN «; 4 2 " : 15 
WAVE lltit "• : SS 

white stab. per doz 
4oz tins, 3 doz in case 75 
12 " 2 doz in case 2 00 
51b " $ " 9 00 

5oz glass jars, 2$ doz 

in case 1 10 

10 oz glass jars, 2 doz 

in case 

Bulk, per lb 




0?PRICEfe 
CREAM 
gAKlNg 

S*emxuu* 



doz. in 
case 
Dime cans, 4 
4 oz " 3 
6 " 
8 " 
12 " 
16 " 
2$lbs 

4 " 

5 " 
" 



3 
1 to 4 
1 to 3 
orl 
orl 
orl 
1 



Price 

p. doz 

$1 00 

1 50 

2 25 

3 00 

4 25 

5 75 
12 00 
18 25 
22 75 
44 00 



BISCUITS. 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFEC- 
TIONERY CO. 

Abernetby 8$ 

Arrowroot 80 11 

Butter o 6 

31bs 080 

Cabin 7J 

Cottage 8 8J 



Digestive 10 

Daisy Wafer 16 

Garibaldi 10 

Gingerbread 11 

Ginger Nuts 10 

Graham Wafer 09 

Lemon 10 

Milk 09 

Nic Nac 12 

Oyster 06 

People's Mixed 10$ 

Pic Nic o 09 

Prairie 08$ 

Rich Mixed 14 

School Cake 11 

Soda 06 

" 3 lb 20 

SuWana 11 

Tea 11 

Tid Bits 09$ 

Variety 11 

Village 07$ 

Wine Oej 

BLACKING. 

Day & Martin's, pints, perdoz $3 20 

" H " 2 10 

X " 1 10 

Spanish, No.8 4 50 

" 5 8 00 

" 10 9 00 

Japanese, No. 3 4 50 

" " 5 7 50 

Jaquot's French No. 2 3 00 

" 3 4 50 

" " " 4 8 00 

" 5 10 00 

" 1-gross Cabinets, asst, 7 50 

Egvptian, No. 1 9 CO 

u " 2 4 50 

P. G. FRENCH DRESSING (LADIES.) 

For ladies' and children's boots and 
shoes. 

per doz 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box $2 00 

No. 4, " " 1 25 

P. O. FRENCH BLACKING. 

per gross 

kNo. 4 : $1 00 

M No. 6 4 50 

\ No.8 7 25 

H No. 10 26 



BLACK LEAD. 

NIXEY'S "W g 

O « 

Refined in Id., 2d , 4d. and ^ u 

Is. packages, (91b. boxes) 7s 6d 82 5 
Jubilee in 1 oz. and 2 oz. 

round blocks in cartons 

(9 lb. boxes) 4s 3d 2 

Silver Moonlight, Plum- 
bago Stove Polish (18$ 

lb. Doxes) 

6$ lb. in large $d. pkts, 1 

gross 4s 3d 1 50 

IS lb. in large $d. pkts, 2 

gross 8s 6d 3 00 

13 lb. in large id. pkts, 1 

gross 7g 6d 2 50 

13 lb. in large 2d. pkts, $ 

gross 7s 6d 2 50 

Reckitt s Black Lead, per box. lis 

Each box contains either 1 gro., I 
oz.: $ gro , 2 oz , or J gro., 4 oz. 

F F. DALLEY & CO 

Per gross 

Silver Star Stove Paste 9 00 

Packed in fancy wood boxes, each 
box contains 3 doz. 
BLUE. 
Reokitt's Pure Bluo. per gross 2 1C 

NIXEY'S 

Soho Square in 81b. boxes, of 
16x6d boxes, London 6s Od 

Soho Square in 8 lb. boxes, of 
16x6d. boxes, Canada 82 25 

CORN BROOMS. 

CHAB. BOECKH & SONS, per doz 

X Carpet, 4 strings, net $3 «n 

s a :; * :: :: ^ 

3 " 3 " 2 

XXX Hurl 4 " ' 2 «o 

IX " 4 " " 3 65 

2X Parlor 4 " " 250 

3 " 3 - " jj 25 

« " » " " 1 85 

5 " * " " 1 50 

Warohouse4 " " 3 25 

Ship 4 " " 4 00 

1 Cable 2 wire bands, net 325 

2 " 3 " " ... 4 00 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 





FOR COOKING 



ST. LAWRENCE 



CORN STARCH. 








Prices Current Continued— 

CANNED GOODS. 

Per doz 

Apples, S's »0 85 SI 00 

gallons 2 00 

Blackberries, 2 2 00 2 26 

Blueberries, 2 1 00 1 10 

Beans, 2 90 1 00 

Com,2's 85 100 

" Special Brands 130 160 

Cherries, red pitted, 2's 2 10 

Peas, 2's 85 1 00 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 175 

" Sugar, 2's 1 50 

Pineapple, 2's 2 75 

Peaches,2's 2 00 2 25 

" 3's 3 00 3 25 

it Pie 3's 

Plums, GrGagesj 2's"!!" 175 200 

Lombard 1 75 1 65 

" Damson Blue 150 190 

Pumpkins, 3's 85 1 00 

" gallons 3 00 3 25 

Raspberries, 2's 2 00 2 40 

Strawberries, choice. 2's . 2 00 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 165 

Tomatoes, 3's 85 100 

"Thistle" Finnan Laddies 1 50 

Lobster. Clover Leaf 2 40 2 50 

" Crown flat 2 40 2 50 

" " tall 1 90 2 00 

Other brands 1 80 2 10 

Mackerel 100 110 

Salmon, tails 145 160 

flats 1 70 

Sardines Albert, %'a tins 12H 

" " V4'a " 20 

Martiny, 34's " . 10 10tf 
" y,'a " . 16 17 

" Other brands, 9& 11 16 17 

" P&C, 54's tins 23 25 

i> " H's " 33 36 

Sardines Amer, H's " 6 1 8 

" K's " 9" 



CANNED MEATS. 

(CANADIAN) 

Comp. Corn Beef lib cans $1 60 

ii » a " 2 65 

• > 4 " 4 80 

•• '• 6 " 8 00 

it ii 14 i' 17 50 

Minced Collops, 2 lbcans 

Boast Beef 1 " 

i' 2 " 2 60 

" '. 4 ' 

Par Ox Tongue, 2% " $8 00 

Ox Tcugue 2 " 7 85 

Lunch Tongue.. 1 " — 

i> .. 2 " 6 00 

English Brawn. 2 " 2 75 

Camb. Sausage. 1 " 

" " .2 " 

Soups, assorted. 1 " .... 

ii ii j ii .... 

Soups & Boulli..2 " 
' " .6 " 

Potted Chicken, Turkey, or 

Game, 6 oz cans 

Potted Ham, Tongue or Btsf, 6 

oz cans 

Devilled Tongue or Ham, V4 lb 

cans 

Devilled Chicken or Turkey, 

H lb cans — 

Sandwich Ham or Tongue, Yt 

lb cans 

Ham, Chicken and Tongue, J 

lb cans 



SI 75 
2 80 

5 00 
8 25 

18 50 
2 60 

1 50 

2 75 
4 75 
8 25 
8 00 

3 25 

6 25 
2 80 



1 60 
1 35 

1 40 

2 25 
1 50 
1 75 



CHEWING GUM. 

ADAMS & SONS CO. 

To Retailers 

Tutti Frutti, 36 5c bars $1 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 235c. packets 75 

Orange Blossom 150 pieces 1 00 

(each box contains a bottle of high 
class perfume. Guaranteed first 
class) 
Monte Cristo. 180 pieces... 130 

(with brilliant stone ring) 
Sappota, 150 pieces ... 1 00 

Sweet Fern, 230 " ... 76 

Bed Rose, 115 pieces... 75 

Magic Trick, 115 " ... 75 

Oolah 115 " ... 75 

Puzzle Gum 115 pieces .... 75 

Bo-Kay 150 " ... 1 00 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c. bars 1 20 

Flirtation Gum (115 pieces) 65 

Automatic ) 

Tutti Frutti Girl.... j-800 pieces. 6 00 
Sign Box (new)...... ) 

C. B. SOMEBV1LLE. 

Mexican Fruit, 36— 5c. Bars, .. 120 

Pepsin (Dyspepsia), 20— 5c. Bars 70 

Sweet Sugar Cane, 150 pieces 1 00 

Celery, 100 " 70 

Lalla Rookh (all flavors) 10o;" 70 

Jingle Bell, 150 " 1 00 

Cracker, 144 " 1 00 

O-Dont-O, 144 ' 1 00 

Little Jap, 100 " 70 

Dude Prize; 144 " 1 00 

Clock Gum comprising,500 pieces 
Gum (assorted flavors), andl 
'Little Lord Fauntleyroy" clock 

fuaranteed.) 3 75 

ia Rosa (20-10c. pieces) 1 40 

Baby (100-lc. pieces) 65 

Alphabet (100-lc. pieces) 65 

Keno Prize (144-lc. pieces) 1 00 

Love Talk (100-lc. pieces) 70 

CHOCOLATES <fe COCOAS. 

TODHUNTEB, MITCHELL & 00. 8 

Chocolate— Per lb 

French, %'s.... 6 and 12 lbs. 30 
Caraccas. Vs.. 6 and 12 lbs. 35 
Premium, i's.. 6 and 12 lbs. 30 

Sante, K's, 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond, H's, 6 and 12 lbs. 22 
Sticks, gross boxes, each.. 00 
Cocoa, Homoepat'c&'s, 8 & 14 lbs 30 
ii Pearl " " " 25 
" London Pearl 12 & 18 " 22 
" Rock " " 30 
" Bulk.inbxs 18 

EPP'd. 

Cocoa— per lb 

Case of 112 lbs each 35 

Smaller quantities o 37 J 

BENSDOBP'S BOTAL DUTCH COCOA. 

"i lb. cans, per doz 92 40 

W " " " 4 50 

1 8 5C 

JPBY'S 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents) 
Chocolate— per lb 

Carracas, I's, 6 lb. boxes 40 

Vanilla, J's, " 40 

" Gold Medal " Sweet, 6 lb bxs. 30 
Pure, unsweetened, i's,61o bxs. 40 
' Fry's " Diamond i's, 6 lb bxs. 26 
" Fry's " Monogram, J, 6 lb bxs. 26 



Cocoa— per doz 

Concentrated, J's, 1 doz in box... 2 40 

J's, " . . 4 50 

" 1 lbs, " ... 8 75 

Homcepathic, i's, 14 lb boxes — 34 

' Jibs, 12 lb boxes... 34 

JOHN P. MOTT & OO.'S 

R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott's Broma per lb 80 80 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homosopat'c Cocoa (is) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa 35 

Mott's Breakf. Cocoa(in tins) 40 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate.. 28 

Mott's Caracas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate... 22 
Mott's French-Can Chocolate 20 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Choc 26 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 30 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 5 

Mott's Vanilla Chocolate stick 92&24 

Mott's Confec Chocolate 22c- 40 

Mott's Sweet Choc. Liquors 21c— 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Cocoas- 
Hygienic, 1, i, i lb. boxes 70 75 

Iceland Moss ^lbin 12lb bxes... 35 

Soluble (bulk) 15 & 30 lb bxs .... 18 20 

Soluble(tins)6 1bandl2lb.... 20 

Cocoa Nibs, any quantity 30 35 

Cocoa Shells, any quantity 05 

Cocca Essence per doz 140 

Chocolates — 

Mexican, X,H in 10 lb bxs 30 

Queen s Dessert, " 40 

Vanilla " 35 

Sweet Caracas " 32 

Chocolate Powder, 15, 30 lb bxs 25 

Chocolate Sticks, per gross.. 00 

Pure Caraoas (plain) K, H lbs 40 

Royal Navy (sweet) " 30 

Confectioners' in 10 lb cakes 30 

Chocolate Creams, in 3 lb bxs 30 

Chocolate Parisien, in 6 lb bxs 30 

WALTEB, BAKES & CO'S 

Chocolate — 
Pre'um No. 1, bxs 12 & 25 lbs each 45 
Baker's Vanilla in bxs 12 lbs each 55 
Caraccas Sweet bxs 6 lbs each, 12 

bxs in case 40 

Best Sweet in bxs, 6 lbs. each, 12 

boxes in case 30 

Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 bxs 

in oase, per box 4 00 

German Sweet Chocolate — 
Grocers' Style, in cases 12 boxes, 

12 lbs each 39 

Grocers' Style, in cases 24 boxes, 6 

lbs each 30 

48 Fingers to the lb., in cases 12 bxs 

12 lbs each 30 

48F>ngersto the lb., in cases 24 bxs 

6 lbs each 30 

8 Cakes to the lb., in cases, 21 bxs 

61bs. each 32 

Soluble Chocolate- 
In canisters, I lb., 4lb., and 101b. 56 

Cocoa — 
Pure Prepared, bxes, 12 lbs each 42 
Cracked, in bxs, 12 lbs., each, J lb. 

papers 35 

Cracked, in bags, 6, 10 and 25 lbs. 

each SO 

Breakfast Cocoa — 
In bxs 8 & 12 lbs. , each, } lb., tins 48 
In boxes, 12 lbs., each, lib tins, 

decorated canisters 50 



Cocoa Shells, 12's and 25's 10 

Broma — 
In boxes, 12 lbs., each, i lb. tins... 45 

MENIER PABBICANT DE CHODOLAT. 

Paris et Noisiel. 

Per 120 lb. Per 12 lb. 

case lot. box. 

-. ,, per lb. per lb. 

Yellow wrapper... $0 34 $0 36 

Chamois 43 48 

Pink 50 56 

Blue 58 66 

Green 50 56 

Lilac 58 66 

Bronze 65 74 

White Glace 73 83 

Premium 38 42 

Fancy Chocolates. 
Fingers- 
Win a box.....perbox| 803 g ^Q 

Croquettes- 
Yellow wrap. " 2 70 3 00 

Gr n een::::::.:: '•' } »« *» 

Croquettes are packed 12 }lb. pack- 
ages in a box, and 8 boxes in a case. 

Pastilles- 
Yellow wrapper per lb SO 40 $0 45 

Gr n een " " } 055 ° 6° 

Each case contains 54 1 lb packages or 
108 J lb packages. 



„.»i!,il l a., IB,»' ,»,lj ; !„, 



;■--- Or- 

Maturated 6«t" 



I" Highland Brand 

Evaporated 

Cream, per 

case , 7 25 

]4 doz. 1 lb tine. 



CLOTHES PINS. 

5 gross, per box 75 

4 gross, " 85 

6 gross, " 120 

ohas. BfflciH & sons, per box 
5 gross, single &10box lots 75 80 

Star, 4 doz. in package 85 

" 6 " " l 25 

" 4 ' cotton bags 90 

COFFEE. 

green c. per lb 

Mocha 28, S3 

Old Government Java 25, 35 

Rio 20 22 

Plantation Ceylon 29, 31 

Porto Rico 24,28 

Guatemala 24, 26 

Jamaica 22, 23 

Maracaibo 24, 26 

TODHUNTEB, MITCHELL & OO.'S 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey •' 30 

Laguayra " 28 

Mocha and Java 85 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 30 

Santos 27 28 



RECKITT'S Blue and Black Lead 1= «- 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



JAM 



We have an immense stock of pure 
Jams and Jellies, put up in Glass Jars 
and 5 lb. and 1 lb. Tins, and in 1 4 lb. and 
28 lb. pails. These goods are as fine 



> and pure as the best imported. A trial will convince. 



TORONTO BISCUIT AND CONFECTIONERY CO., 



Tel. 528. 



7 Front St. East, Toronto. 



Prieet current, continued — 

J. W. COWAN <fc CO. 

Standard Java in scaled tins, 

85 and 50 lbs 30 

Standard Imperial in sealed 

tins, 25 and 50 lbs 32 

Standard Blend in sealed tins, 

25 and 50 lbs S3 

Ground, in tins, 5, 10, 15 and 

25 lbs 80 30 

Say's Parisian, in y, and lb tins 30 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum lb $0 02 $0 03 

Blue Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstone 03 08} 

Borax 12 14 

Camphor 65 75 

Carbolic Acid SO 50 

Castor Oil 07* 08 

Cream Tartar 28 30 

Epsom Salts 01} 02 

Paris Green 16 17 

Extraot Logwood, bulk 18 14 

" " boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 13 

Glycerine, per lb 17 20 

Hellebore 16 17 

Iodine 5 50 6 00 

Insect Powder 30 36 

Salpetre 08* 09 

Soda Bicarb, per keg 2 50 2 75 

Sal Soda 1 00 1 25 

Madder 12} .... 



ll 



DURABLE PAILS AND TUBS 

WM. CANE & SONS, MANUFACTURING CO 



Currants, Patras, bbls 

" " i bbls 

" " oases 

" Vostizzas, cases... 

" " } cases 

11 5-crown Excelsior 

(cases) 

" }case.... 

Dates, Persian, boxes, 

Figs, Elemes, 14oz., perbox 

" 10 1b boxes 

" 30 lb bxs. 7 crown 

Prunes, Bosnia, casks 

" " cases, new. 

Raisins, Valencia, off stalk 

old 

Selected 

Layers 

Raisins, Sultanas 

" Eleme 

1 Malaga : 

London layers 

Loose muscatels 

Imperial cabinets 

Connoisseur clusters ... 4 

Extra dessert '' 

" " ! qrs. . 

Royal clusters 

Fancy Vega boxes 

Black baskets 3 

•' ■' qrs 

Blue " 

Fina Dehesas 

" " qrs 

Lemons 3 

Oranges, Jamaioa 2 

" Valenoias 

" Floridas .„ 3 

" Seedlings 

" Navels 



... 6 

7 7 

7} 9 

8% 10 



8} 

5 

11 

11 

15 
4} 
8i 



HI 
12 
16 
5i 

9 

a 

71 



3 

7} 8 
61 10 



2 25 2 50 



00 4 50 
... 4 50 



60 3 80 



00 3 50 

75 3 00 

.. 4 50 

00 3 50 



NEWMARKET. 

Per doz. 

Steel hoops, painted and erain'd 2 20 

Brass hoops, oiled and varnish. 3 25 

No 1 tubs 9 50 

No 2 " 8 50 

No 3 " 7 50 



DOMESTIC 

Apples, Dried, per lb 

do Evaporated 



04} 
071 



05$ 
08 



EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold, No. 8, p. doz . $0 75 
" " '• 1,11 oz... 1 25 

" «' " "• 2,2 oz 1 75 

" " " " S, 3oz.... 2 00 

(seelt's flavobing) per doz 

Concentrated, 2 oz. full measure 175 

" 4 oz. " " 3 00 

In Lemon, Vanilla and Assorted 

Flavors. Less 10 per cent, discount 

& gross quantities or more. 



FLUID BEEF. 



JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL 

per doz 
Cases, No. 1,2 oztins . 
" No. 2, 4 oz tins.. 
" No. 3, 8 oz tins.. 
" No. 4,1 lb tins.. 
" No. 5. 2 lb tins.. 



FISH. 

Oysters, per gallon 

" seleot, per gallon 

Pickerel per lb 

Pike do 

White fish do 

Manitoba White fish do 

Salmon Trout do 

Lake herring p. 100 

Pickled and Salt Fish : 
Labrador herring, p.bbl 

Shore herring " 

Salmon trout, per 1 bbl 
White Fish, 1 bbl 

Driod Fish : 

Codfish, per quintal 

" cases 

Boneless fish per lb 

Boneless cod " 

Smoked Fish: 
Finnan Haddies. per lb 

Bloaters per box 

Digby herring " 



1 50 



1 25 

6' 06 
07 
07 
71 
07 

2 50 



6 00 



6 25 
5 00 
5 00 5 50 
5 50 5 75 

5 25 5 75 

5 00 5 50 

041 

.... 08 



071 081 

1 00 2 25 



.. *2 75 $3 00 sea Fish : Haddockper lb 

. 4 50 5 00 cod " 

. 8 00 8 75 B.C.salmon " 

.12 60 14 25 Market Cod " 

. 25 00 27 Ot Frozen Sea Herrings 



05 



20 

05{ 
07 
13 



1 75 2 cO 



FRUITS. 



GRAIN . 



fobeign. WheatjFall,No2, 66 67 

c.perlt " Red Winter, No 2 65 66 

Currants, Provincial, bbls. ... 5$ Wheat, Spring, No 2 64 65 

" " 1 bbls ... 6 " Man Hard, No 1.. 91 92 

" Filiatras, bbls 5§ " " No 2.. 81 85 

" " Ibbls ... 6 6J ' ' No. 3... 9 77 77} 



Oats, No 2, per 34 lbs ... . 31 32 

Barley, No 1, per 48 lbs.. 49 50 

" No 2 extra 43 46 

" No 3 " 38 39 

Rye 59 60 

Peas .- 58 60 

Corn 56 57 



HAT <fe STRAW. 

Hay, Pressed, "on track .... 9 00 
Straw Pressed," .... 6 00 6 50 



HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 

Cut Nails, from Toronto 

50 to 60 dv basis 2 30 

40 dy....'. 2 35 

30 dy 2 40 

20, 16andl2dy 2 45 

10 dy 2 50 

8and9dy 2 55 

6and7dy 2 70 

5dy 2 90 

4dy AP 2 90 

Sdy AP 3 30 

4dyCP 2 80 

3dyCP 3W 

Horse Nails: 

"C" 60 and 5 per cent, from list. 
Hobse Shoes: 

From Toronto, per keg 3 65 

Scbews : Wood- 
Flat head iron 771 p.o. dis 
Round " " 72* p.o. dis. 
Flat head brass 75 p.c. dis 
Round head brass 70 p o. 

Window Glass : [To find out what 
break any required size of pane comes 
under, add its length and breadth to- 
gether. Thus in a 7x9 pane the 
length and breadth come to 16 
inches; which shows it to be a first- 
break glass, i.e., not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in and under) 135 

2nd " (26 to 40 inches) 1 55 

3rd " (41 to 50 " ) 3 40 

4th " (51 to 60 " ) 3 70 

5th " (61 to 70 " 4 00 

Rope : Manilla 11} 

Sisal 09} 

New Zealand 08} 

Axes : Per box, $6 to $12. 

Shot : Canadian, dis. 121 Per oent. 

Hinges: Heavy T and strap ...04} 05 
" Screw, hook & strap. 03} 043 

White Lead : Puro Ass'n guarantee 
ground in oil. 

251b. irons per lb 4 4V4 

No. 1 " ... 5 

No.2 " .. 4K 

No. 3 " .. 4 

Turpentine Selected packages, per 
gal 60 

Linseed Oil per gal, raw 56} 57} 
Boiled, per gal 59} 60} 

Glue: Common, per lb.... 10 11 

INDURATED TIBRE WARE. 

}pail,6qt $4 00 

Star Standard, 12 qt 4 50 

Milk, 14 qt 5 50 

Round bottomed fire pail, 14 qt, 6 50 



Tubs, No. 1 15 so 

S 13 25 

_ " » 11 00 

Nests of 3 3 40 

Heelers No. 1 io 00 

a 9 00 

' 3 8 00 

4 7 00 

Milk pans 3 25 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 3 25 

' " round " 3 60 

Handy dish 3 75 

Water Closet Tanks 18 00 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

DELHI CANNING CO 

Jams assorted, extra fine, l's . 2 35 
Jellies, extra fine l's 2 26 

TORONTO BISCUIT &CONFEOTIONEBY CO 

Per lb 
Jams, absolutely pure— apple... $0 06 

Family 07 

Black and Red currant. Rasp- 
berry, Strawberry, Peach 

and Gooseberry per lb 12 

Plum 10 

Jellies — pure — all kinds 10 

These goods are put up in 
glass j-ars and in 5, and 10 
lb. tins and 28 lb. pails. 
Marmalade— orange 12 

KNIFE POLISH. 

NIXET'S 

" Cervus" boxes of 1 dor. 

6d London 5s., Canada, $2 00 

"Cervus" boxes of 1 doz. 

Is London 10s,, Canada, $4 00 

LICORICE. 

YOUNG & SMYLIE'S LIST. 

5 lb boxes, wood or paper, per lb 40 
Fancy bxs. (36 or 50 sticks), per 

box 1 25 1 25 

'• Ringed" 5 lb boxes, per lb 40 

" Acme" Pellets, 51b oans, per 

can 2 00 

'Acme" Pellets, Fancy boxes 

(30s) per box 150 

" Acme" Pellets, Fanoy paper 

boxes, per box (40s) 1 25 

Tar Licorice and ToluWafers, 5 

lb cans per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb glass 

jars 1 75 

Licorice Lozenges 5 lb cans... 1 50 
Purity" Licorice, 200 sticks. 1 45 
100 " . 72} 
Imitation Calabria, 5 lb bxs 

plb 25 

MINCE MEAT. 

J. H. WETH2Y'S— ST.CATHABINES 

Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

ELLIS <fc KEIGHLBY'B. Ot* 

Durham, Fine, in 1 and } lb tins 

perlb 25 

" Fine, in 1 lb jars 22 

" Fine, in 4 lb jars 70 

" Ex. Sup., in bulk.per lb SO 

' Superior in bulk, p. lb 20 

Fine, " fi 15 

Cherry's Ibish 

Pure in 1 lb. tins 40 

Pure in lib. ting 42 

Pure in J lb. tin* 44 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Priea current, continued. 

NUTS. per lb 

Almonds, Ivica 13 14 

" Tarragon* 154 16 

•' Fomigetta 1? 14 

Almonds, Shelled Valenoias S8 32 

Jordan. 40 45 

" '• Canary ... 88 30 

Bra«il " "J 

Coooanuts 5, $ 

Filberts, Sioily 9* 10 

Pecans 11 W 

Peanuts, roasted 10 IX 

" green 9 10 

Walnuts, Grenoble 15 16 

" Bordeaux 10 11 

" Naples, cases 

" Marbots IS* 13 

•' Chills 1* 13 

PBTBOLEUM. 

to 10 bbl lots, Toronto... Imp . gai 

Canadian 14 $0 15 

Carbon Safety 17 18 

Canadian Water White 20 82 

Amer'n Prime White 23 

" Water White.. 84 25 

Photogene 87 00 

(For prices at Petrolia, see Market 
Report.) 

PICKLES & SAUCES. 

THE T. A. SNIDER PBE6EETE CO., 
CINCINNATI. 

Wright & Copp, Toronto, Agents,) 
per doz 

omt Made Tomato Catsup, qts 6 00 
" •' pts 3 50 

" " X pts 2 00 

hili Sauce pts 4 50 

" Vi pts 3 85 

Soups (in 3 lb cans). 

Tomato 3 50 

Fancy— Chicken, Mock Turtle- 
Cream of Corn Pea, Celery, 

Asparagus 4 50 

Fancy — Chicken Gumbo, Oy 
Tail, Consomme Bouillon, 
Mulligatawny, Mutton Broth, 
Beef, Pea, Printanir, Julienne 
Vermicelli, Vegetable 4 85 



lea A febrin'b. per doi 
Worcester Sauce, J pts.. $3 60 $3 7b 
" " pints 6 85 6 60 

LAZENBT & sons Per dos 

Plokles, all kinds, pints 3 85 

" » quarts 6 00 

Harvey Sauce-genuine— hlf. pts 3 85 
Mushroom Catsup " 8 25 

Anchovy Sauce " 3 85 

PRODUCE. 

dairy. Per b 

Butter, creamery, tubs. 90 21 SO 23 

" dairy, tubs, choice 16 20 

" " medium 14 16 

" low grades to com 
Butter, pound rolls — 

" large rolls 

" store crooks — 
Cheese 



12 

19 

8 

8 



13 
20 

20 
80 
Hi 



COUNTRY 



Eggs, fresh, per doz 

" limed. 

Beans 1 15 

Onions, per bbl 1 75 

Potatoes, per bag 60 

Hops, 1891crop 18 

" 1892 •' 16 

Honey, extraoted 05 

" section 18 



PROVISIONS. 



85 
17 

1 35 

2 85 
70 

15 
18} 
07 
14 



11 



Bacon, long clear, p lb. 10} 
Pork, mess, p. bbl 

" shortcut 17 50 18 00 

Hams, smoked, per lb 13 

" pickled 12 

Bellies 13 

Rolls 10J 

Backs 012J 13 

Lard, Canadian, per lb 12 12) 

Compound 10 

Tallow, refined, per lb.. 05 05} 

" rough, " 02 



RICE, ETC. 



Per lb 



Bice, Aracan 



3J 4 

Patna 4} 51 

Japan 5 6} 

extra Burmah 3J 4 

Java extra 6} 7 

Genuine Old Carolina .... 9} 10 



GrandDuke 6| 7J 

Bago Aii 5} 

Tapiooa, 6 5} 

ROOT BEER. 

Hire's (Liquid) per dos $2 00 

SPICES. 

oboond Per lb. 

Pepper, black, pure $0 12}$0 15 

" fine to superior — 10 15 

" white, pure 20 28 

" fine to choice 20 85 

Ginger, Jamaica, pure 25 27 

African, " 16 18 

Cassia, fine to pure 18 25 

Cloves, " " 14 85 

Allspice, choice to pure 12 15 

Cayenne, " " 80 35 

Nutmegs, " " 75 1 20 

Mace, " " .... 1 00 1 85 

Mixed Spice, choice to pure. 30 36 

Cream of Tartar, fine to pure 26 S2 

STARCH. 

BRITISH AMERICA STARCH CO 
BBANTFOBD. 

1st quality white, in kegs and brls 4J 

1st quality white, 3 lb. cartoons,. 51 

Lily White gloss, crates 6} 

Brantford gloss, lib 7$ 

Lily White gloss, 1 lb chromo.... 6} 

Canada Laundry, Boxes 4{ 

Pure Prepared corn 7} 

Challenge Corn 6f 

Rice Starch, fancy cartoons 8} 

" cubes 7} 

KINGSFORDS OSWEGO STARCH. 

Pure Starch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 8 and 4 lb paok'g's 8 

36-lb " 3 lb. packages 8 

18-lb " 8} 

38 to 45-lb boxes , 6 

Silver Gloss Starch— 

40-lb boxes, 1, 2 and 4,1b. pack'g's 9 

40-lb " ilb.package 9} 

40-lb " Jib. " 10 

40-lb " assorted } and J lbs. 9} 

6-lb " sliding covers 9} 

38 to 45 lb boxes 9 



Oswego Corn Starch— for Puddings, 
Custards, etc.— 

40-lb boxes, 1 lb packages 8} 

20-lb " " 8j 

ST. LAWRENCE STARCH CO. '8 

Culinary Starches — 

St. Lawrenoe corn staroh 7 

Durham oorn starch 6} 

Laundry Starches- 
No. 1, White, 4 lb. Cartons 4 

" " Bbls 

" " Kegs 

Canada Laundry 4 

Ivory Gloss, six 6 lb.bozes, slid- 
ing covers 6} 

Ivory Gloss, fanoy picture, 1 lb 

packs 6} 

Patent Starch, fancy pioture, 1 

lb. cartons 6} 

Ivorine Staroh in cases of 40 
packages $3 00 



ii 



SUGAR. 



c. per lb 



4| «J 

llb.bxs ... 51 



Granulated 4) 

Paris Lump.bbls and 100 I" 

" " 501b. boxes. 

Extra Ground, bbls . 

" " less than a bbl 

Powdered, bbls 5 

" less than a bbl 

Extra bright refined 

Bright Yellow 3] 

Medium " 

Brown 



SALT. 

Bbl salt, car lots 100 

Coarse, car lots, F.O.B 65 

" small lots 085 090 

Dairy, car lots, F O.B 100 

" small lots 125 

" quarter-sacks 40 45 

Common, fine car lots 75 

" small lots 95 1 00 

Rock salt, per ton * 12 00 

Liverpool coarse 75 80 

STRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

Per lb. 
bbls. } bbls 

»i 

21 24 

2| 3J 



BYROPB. 



W. G. A. LAMBE & CO., 

GROCERY BROKERS 
TORONTO. 



Agents for 



The St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co., 

MONTREAL. 

INFINITELY SUPERIOR TO EXTRACT OF BEEF. 



Johnston's Fluid Beef 

Is the concentrated feeding qualities of Beef, de- 
prived of superfluous material, skin, fat or indi- 
gestible tissue, and it is the quintessence of the 
virtues of Beef, 

Extracts of Beef, on the other hand, are only 
the extracted juices of Beef, which, at best, can 
only stimulate. 



Kingston's Oswego 

STARCH. 



STRONGEST. PUREST. 



BEST. 



"THE ORIGINAL" 



"Silver Gloss" 

(Others so-called are imita- 
tions of our brand.) 

Pure Starch. 



FOR THE TABLE. 

Kingsford's 
Corn Starch. 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING 
JOBBERS IN CANADA. 



T. KINGSFORD & SON 



OSWEGO, N.Y. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 




PURE CALABRIA " Y. & S." LICORICE, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16s to pound. 
"ACME" LICORICE PELLETS, In 5-pound Tin Cans. 

TAR, LICORICE and TOLU WAFERS', in 5-pound Tin Cans. 

LICORICE "Y. & S." LOZENGES, In 5-pound Tin Cans and 5-pound Glass Jars. 
"PURITY," PURE PENNY-LICORICE, 100 and 200 Sticks in a Box. 



Manufactured 

Exclusively by 

Where did you see this advertisement ? 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. 



Pricti current, continued— 

v.b n 3 

E.V.B 21 2J 

E.Superior 2* 2| 

XX . 21 2} 

XXX 2} 3 

Crown 3 °i 

molasses. Per gal 

Trinidad, in puncheons.... 35 37 

bbls 38 46 

}bbls 40 40 

New Orleans, ir» bbls 30 52 

Porto Rico, hdds 38 40 

barrels 42 44 

} barrels 44 46 

SOAP. 

Ivory Bar, 1 lb; bars per lb 5$ 

Do. 2, 6-16 and 3 lb bars " 5 

Primrose.4} lb bars.waxW " 4} 

1 " " '■ 4| 

John A, cake, wax W.perdoz 42 

Mayflower, cake, " " 42 

Gem, 31b bars per lb 3* 

•' 13 oz, 1 and 2 lb. bars 3} 

Queen's Laundry, per bar 5} 

Pride of Kitchen, per box 2 75 

Sunshine, boxes, 100 tablets 6 50 

" 50 " 3 40 

MORSE'S soaps. Per lb 

Mikado (wrapped) 04} 

Eclipse " 04| 

Stanley Bar 04} 

Defiance -• 04} 

Toronto, 12 oz Perdoz 50 

Ruby, 10 oz " 30 

Monster, 8 oz " 24 

Detroit, 14 oz " 48 

Lily White " 90 

Everyday " 80 

Queen City, 14 oz " 72 

Per box 

Mottled in 5 box lots, 100 bars... 5 00 

" " 60 bars... 3 00 

Floater (boxes free) 6 50 

Electric 2 75 

Hard Water Electric 2 50 

Royal Laundry 3 25 

Octagon » * 00 

Per doz 

Royal Magnum 25 

" '• 25 doz per box. 20 

Anchor, Assorted 40 

" Castile 50 

Morse's Assorted 45 

Morse's Rose 45 

" Windsor 45 

Castile 45 

Bouquet, paper and wood 80 

Prize Magnum, White Castile . 72 

" " Honey 72 

" Glycerine 72 

" Oatmeal 72 

Per box 
" ' Honeysuckle ... 72 

SweetBriar 85 

Extra Perfume 55 

Old Brown Windsor Squares .. 30 

. % White Lavender 1 00 

1 1 Per doz 

White Castile Bars 85 

White Oatmeal 85 

Persian Boquet, paper 2 50 

Oriental 45 

Pure Cocoanut, 3 doz. bxs, wood 40 

Heliotrope paper 150 

Carnation 60 

Rose Boquet 60 

Coooa Castile 40 

Arcadian 45 

New Arcadian, per gross 4 25 

Ocean Coquet 45 

Barber's Bar, per lb 25 

Pure Bath 1 00 

Magnolia 1 20 

Oatmeal 86 



Unscented Glycerine 90 

Grey Oatmeal 60 

Plain Honey 70 

Plain Glycerine 70 

Plain Windsor 70 

Fine Bouquet 100 

Morse's Toilet Balls 90 

Turkish Bath 60 

Infants' Delight 1 20 

TEAS. 

CHINA GREENS 

Gunpowder— per lb 

Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 
Young Hyson — 

Cases, sifted, extra firsts ... 42 50 

Cases, small leaf, firsts 35 40 

Half chests, ordinary firsts 22 38 

" " seconds 17 19 

thirds 15 17 

" common 11 14 

PINO SCETS. 

Young Hyson- 
Hal? chests, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" " seconds 16 19 

JAPAN. 

Half Chests- 
Choicest 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 12} 15 

Nagasaki, }oheets Pekoe... 16 22 

" Oolong 14 15 

" " Gunpowder 16 19 

" " Sittings.... 5 9 
Congou — BLACK. 
Half Chests, Kaisow, Mon- 

ing, Pakling 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow... 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong lg 30 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 4o 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS 

British Consols, 4's ; bright twist, 

5's; Twin Gold Bar, 8's 67o 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8's 64 

Laurel, 3's 57 

Brier, 7's 55 

Index, 7's 50 

Honeysuckie,7's 58 

Napoleon, 8's 54 

Royal Arms,12's 55 

Victoria, 12's 53 

Brunette, 12's 50 J 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 51} 

" in 40 lb boxes . . . . 51 
Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T <fe 

B, 3's 60 

Lily, 7's 55 

Diamond Solace, 12's 50 

Mvrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb tins 70 

J lb pg, 6 lb boxes 70 

oz pg, 51b boxes 70 

EMPIRE TOBACCO COMPANY. 
COT SMOKING. 

Golden Plug, 2 oz. pkg boxes, 5 

lbs 65 

Uncle Ned, 2 oz. pkg, bxs 5 lbs 60 

Gem, 2 oz, packages, 5 lb boxes 61 

Gem, 8oz tins in 6 lb cases 70 



PLUG SMOKING, 

Golden Plug 56 

Uncle John, 3x6, 3s. caddies 

16} lbs 54 

Gem. 3x6, 3s. caddies 16} lbs.... 53 
St. Lawrence, 2x3, 7s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 51 

Banner, 2 x .>, ;a. caddies about 

17lbs 48 

Sterlng, 2x3, 7s. caddies about 

17 lbs 46 

Louise, Solace, 12s. caddies about 

16 lbs 46 

Florence, Solace, 12s. caddies 

about 17 lbs 42 

Hawthorne, 8s. butts 23 lbs 47 

Something Good, 6s. butts 21 lbs 46} 

FANCY 8WEBT CHEWING. 

Good Luck, spun roll, 16 boxes 

4 lbs 65 

Empire, 3x6, 4s. spaced 8s. bxs 

41bs 61 

Top, 16 oz. spaced 8s. boxes 4 lbs 60 

Joy, 3 x 12s., 14J oz. Spaced 6s. 

Rough and ready. Butts 25 lbs 52 
Judge, 2x3, 8s. Flat. Caddies 

about20} lbs 50 

Currency, 3 x 3, 7s. Rough and 

ready. Caddies about 21 lbs. 49 
Kentucky, 1} x 3, 13s. Caddies 

about 21 lbs 50 

Kentucky, 1} x 3, 7s. Caddies 

about 21} lbs 49 

BLACK SWEET CHEWING. 

Star, Narrow, 12s. Butts about 

22 lbs 47 

Morning Star, 12s. Butts about 

22} lbs 43} 

Montreal Twist, 12s. Caddies 

about 23 lbs 44 

Anchor Twist, 12s. Caddies about 

23 lbs 42} 

cigars — 8. davir & sons, Montreal. 

Sizes. Per M 

Madre E' Hijo, Lord Landsdow$60 00 

" Panetelas 60 00 

" " Bouquet 60 00 

" Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow ., 85 00 

" Reina Victoria 80 00 

" Pins 55 00 

E 1 Padre, Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Vict., Especial.. 50 00 
" Conchas de Regalia ... 50 00 

" Bouquet 55 00 

Pins 60 00 

" Longfellow 80 00 

' ' Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo.Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas 30 00 

Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes, all Tobacco — 

Cable 7 00 

ElPadre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

cigarettes. Per M- 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 00 

B. C.No. 1 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 50 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

out tobaccos. per lb 

Puritan, tenths, 5 lb. boxes 74 

Old Chum, ninths, 5 lb box 71 

Old Virgin., 1-10 lbpkg, 10 lbbxs 62 
Gold Block, ninths, 5 lb boxes. 73 



CIGARETTE TOBACCO. 

B. C.N.I, 1-10, 5 lb boxes 

Puritan, 1-10, 5 lb boxes 86 

Athlete, per lb 1 15 

Hyde Park 10 So 

VINEGAR. 

XX, W. W 02c 

XXX, W.W 5 

Honey Dew 30 

Pickling 30 

Malting _ 

WOODENWARE. per doz 

Pails, 2 hoop, clear Nr 1... $1 70 

" 8 " " 1 90 

Pails, 2hoops, clear ...:.No. 2.. 1 60 

" 3 " " » ..180 

" 3 " painted... " ... 1 80 

Tubs, No. 9 50 

1 8 00 

" 2 7 00 

'* 8 6 00 

Washboards, Globe $1 90 2 00 

" Water Witch .... 1 40 

" Northern Queen 2 25 

Planet 1 70 

Waverly 1 60 

XX 1 50 

X 130 

" Single Crescent... 1 85 

" Double " ... 2 75 

" Jubilee 2 25 

" Globe Improved. 1 90 

" Quick and Easy . 1 80 

World 1 75 

" Rattler 1 30 

per case. 
Matches, 5 case lots, single cases 

Parlor 1 60 $1 65 

Telephone ... 3 60 3 70 

Telegraph.... 3 80 3 90 

Safety 4 20 4 30 

French 3 60 3 75 

Railroad (10 gro. in case) 

Single case and under 5 cs. $3 70 

5 cases and under 10 cases ... 3 60 

Steamship (10 gro. in case) 

Single oase and under 5 cs. S 60 

5 oases and under 10 cases... 3 40 

per doz 

Mops and Handles, comb. 125 

Butter tubs 81 60 $3 20 

Butter Bowls, crates ast'd 3 60 



®Hon 
Wa 
5c p 
10c 



WASHING 
COMPOUND. 

Housekeeper's Quick- 

Washing per case. 

5c pkgs 100 in case ... 3 50 



60 in case 



4 00 



PEERLESS WASHING COMPOUND. 

per case 
hi lb packages, 12 doz in case ... $4 50 
V4 " 6 " ... 3 90 

1 lb " 3 " .. 8 60 

5 cts " 100 " . . 3 50 

YEAST. 

BARM MFG. CO. 



1 box containing 2 doz. 5c pkgs. 50 
1 '• " 2 doz. 10c. " 1 




per box 

" 50 

00 

BREADMAKEB'S 

per box 
5c packages 36 in box 1 00 
2c " 15 in box 50 



40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



T IS IE 



ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO'S 

GRANULATED 

AND YELLOWS 

AND 8YRUP8 

ARE PURE 

: flO BLUEING : 

Material whatsoever is used in the manufacture of 



THE CANADA SUGAR REFINING GO'Y [limited], 

MOITTBEAL. 
Manufacturers of Refined Sugars of the well-known Brand 




Of the Highest Quality and Purity, made by the Latest Processes, and the Newest 
and Best Machinery, not Surpassed Anywhere. 

Lump Sugar, in 50 and 100 lb. boxes. 

"Crown" Granulated, Special Brand, the finest which can be made 

Extra Granulated! very Superior Quality. 

"Cream" Sugars, (not dried.) 

YellOW Sugars of all Grades and Standards. 

Syrups of all Grades in Barrels and Half Barrels. 

Sole Makers of high class Syrups in tins, 2 lb. and 8 lb. each. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Travellers' Guide. 

- The Alberta Hotel - 



CALGARY, N.W.T. 



8trictly first-class. Headquarters for Commercial 
> Men. Large sample rooms. 



H. A. PERLEY, Prop. 



The Hiliiard House 

RAT PORTAGE, ONT. 



Strictly first-class. The favorite commercial 
house along the line of C PR 

LOUIS HILLIARD, Prop. 

THE LELAND HOUSE, 

Portage La Prairie, Man. 



Best sample rooms west of Winnipeg. Strictly 
first-class. 



WM. NEVINS, Prop. 



Grand Pacific Hotel 

KAMLOOPS, B.C. 



The leading hotel in the city. Sample rooms 
convenient to scores, provided for commercial 
men 

H. SMITH, Proprietor. 

The Hotel Wilson. 

NANAIMO, B. C. 



The largest and best Hotel in the city. 

JOS. RICHARDS, 

Proprietor. 



Unlike the Dutch Process 




No Alkalies 



Other Chemicals 

are used in the 
preparation of 

I. Baler k Co.'s 



Breakfast Cocoa, 



which is absolutely pure 

and soluble. 

A description of the chocolate 
plant, and of the various cocoa 
and chocolate preparations man- 
ufactured by Walter Baker & Co. 
will be sent free to any dealer on 
application. 



W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. U.S.A. 
Branch House, 6 Hospital St., Montreal. 



CHAKLES F. CLARK, 

President. 



EBW. P. RANDOLPH, 
Treasurer. 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 
THE BRADSTREET 

MERCANTllE dQENCT 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY, 

Executive Offices, PROPRIETORS. 

NOS. 279, 281 AND 283 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Officet in the principal cities of the United State* 
Canada, the European Continent., Australia and 
in London, England. 
The Bradstreet Company is the eldest and, 
financially, the strongest organization of its 
kind— working in one interest and under one 
management— with wider ramifications, with 
more capital invested in the business, and it 
expends more money every year for the collec- 
tion and dissemination of information than any 
similar institution in the world. 

TORiwrn nwir-R 36 Front St. East and 

TORONTO OFFICE 2? Wellington g t East 
THOS. C. IRVING, Superintendent. 



Add: 



Add-let 



Advertising: 
Advertiser 



Advertisement: 
Advertisers^^ 



- - - EXPLANATION - - - 

ADD 

Put together 

ADD-LET 

Your Advertisment 

ADVERTISING 

When Spending Money 

ADVERTISE 

To give Notice 

ADVERTISMENT 

The Goods You have For Sale 
(So you wll! class with) 

ADVERTISERS 

Those Who Make Money 




PAYS 



NO BETTER MEDIUM THAN 



+ 



The. - - - 
i Canadian 
Grocer - 



THE RIPANS TABULES regulate the stomach, 
liver and bowels, purity the blood, aie pleas- 
ant to take, safe and a] ways effectual. A reliable 
remedy for Biliousness, Blotches on the Face, 
Bright/s Disease, Catarrh, Colic, Constipation, 
Chronic Diarrhoea, Chronic Liver Trouble, Dia- 
betes, Disordered Stomach, Dizziness, Dysentery, 
Dyspepsia, Eczema, Flatulence, Female Com- 

Slaints, Foul Breath, Headache, Heartburn, Hives, 
aundice. Kidney Complaints, Liver Troubles, 
Loss of Appetite, Mental Depression, Nausea. 



Nettle Rash, 
tion. Pimples, 
to the Head, 
plexion, Salt 
Head, Scrof- 
ache, Skin Dis- 
Stomach, Tired 
Liver, Ulcers, 
and every oth- 
or disease that 




Painful Diges- 
Rush of Blood 
Sallow Corn- 
It houm, Scald 
ula,Sick Head- 
eases.Sour 
Feeling.Torpid 
Water Brash 
er symptom 
results from 



impure blood or a failure in the proper perform- 
ance of their functions by the stomach, liver and 
intestines. Persons given to over-eating are ben- 
efited by taking one tabule after each meal. A 
continued use of the Ripans Tabules is the surest 
cure for obstinate constipation. They contain 
nothing that can be injurious to the most deli- 
cate. 1 gross $2, 1-2 gross $1.26, 1-4 gross 76c., 
1-24 gross 16 cents. Sent by mail postage paid. 
Address THE RIPANS CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
P. O Box 672. New York. 



THE 



OakYille Basket Co., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




I, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets, 
i, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets, 
i, 2, 3 clothes baskets, 
i, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For sale by all Woodenware Dealer 



Oakville, Ont. 



DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE & SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT., 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly fall off. The hoops expand and oontract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE, 

Represented by 
Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons. Montreal. 



* ORDER 

—IVORY BAR 
SOAP 



OLD CHUM 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PLUG AND CUT 



Q 
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O 

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Gboice 
Retailing 
Godfisb. 



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H. W. Nqrthrup & Go. 



St. John, N. B. 



JOHN PETERS & CO., 

General Commission Merchants 
and Brokers, 

Halifax, N. S. and 
Kingston, Jamaica, W.I. 

Agents for The E. B. EDDY MFG CO., 
HULL, P. Q. 



We are open to accept one or two more Agen- 
cies of first-class houses, either at Halifax or 
Kingston. We have a good connection and 
splendid storage facilities. 
References: The Merchants Bank of Halifax. 
The E. B. Eddy Agencies. Mfg Co., Hull.P.Q, 
The Mercantile Agencies. 




LONDON, 



Tea Caddies all Sizes 

SPICE, BAKING POWDER AND TOBACCO TINS, 

AND TIN SIGNS, 

LITHOGRAPHED OR JAPANNED. 

Write our nearest house for Catalogue and Prices 

THE M C CLARY M'FG COMPANY, 

TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



PITTSBURGH 



THE 



LAMP 



UNEQUALLED. 



PERHAPS YOU HAVE 
. NOT SEEN 



The " Pittsburgh" 

BUT YOU MUST HAVE HEARD 
THAT 

It affords a Brighter Light ™^^°™ ER 



Made in all sizes HANGING, BANQUET, WRITE FOR - 

of VASE and PIANO. - catalogue. 

SOLE WHOLESALE ACENTS ROWANS, KENT AND CO., 
FOR CANADA: - - u — 



TORONTO and WINNIPEG. 




TORONTO SALT WORKS, 

128 Adelaide E., Toronto, 

Sole CI tyAgentsf or the "Canada Salt Association' 



Dealers in all kinds of Table, Dairy, Meat Cur- 
ing, Barrel and Land Salts. 

The " Acme " Table Salt (new process) will not 
get damp or hard. 

Two Silver Medals, at Industrial Exhibition 
Toronto, 1890, for our "Acme" Table Salt and 
our "Star Brand" Dairy Salt. 

Florida Oranges, 
Almeria Grapes, 

Lemons, Cranberries, 
Nuts of all kinds, 

Figs and Dates. 

DAWSON & CO., 

32 WEST MARKET ST., 

Telephone 1471. TORONTO. 

Consignments of Produce Solicited. 

FAC SIMILE OF PACKAGE. 




]£H£BQI£5S 




WILL 

NOT 









ni 



mm CARBON 

I 



SAFETY. 



Ljqrdnt 

k 0NT. 



SAFETY 



THE BEST 

MacLaren's 

IMPERIAL 

CHEESE 

IN GLASS JARS. 

WRIGHT & COPP, 

DOMINION AGENTS, 

TORONTO. 



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HYDE PARK. ATHLETE, PURITAN, DERBY. SWEET SIXTEEN CIGARETTES. 



5. DAVIS & SONS, LARGEST CIGAR MANUFACTURERS IN CANADA 



Published 
weekly 

2t)0 PER YEAR 




VOL. VII. 



TORONTO, FEBRUARY 3 1893. 



No. 5 





COLMANS MUSTARD 

HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 



ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 




tWo-gold-jwed^ls 
international health exhibition london 1554 

On\yVriyif\<id<>l]opdon.mZ «r£ OnlySilvterMcdal?aris.lX75 
Only Jfyrdal Dublin. 1S65. w Qrand qdd^cdal^oscowlS/^X'S 




> 

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Pi 



ASK YOUR 
WHOLESALE GROCER 



-FOR 



RAILROAD AND STEAMSHIP 

MATCHES 



GUARANTEED 
Second to None. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 

56 AND 58 FRONT ST. W. 

TOEONTO. 




MAKE SIMPLY WITH BOILING MILK OR WATER 

FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS. 



DUNNS 
BAKING 
POWDER 

THE COOK'S BEST FRIEND 

Largest sale in Canada. 



Don tjail to handle 



THE CELEBRATED IMPORTED 

MENIERE 
[HOME 



ANNUAL SALES EXCEED 33 MILLION LBS. 

TD HAVE IT ADVERTISED 
FREE & FREELY 

IN YOUR OWN NAME AMONGST 
YOUR CUSTOMERS WRITE TO: 

C.ALFRED Chouillou agent Montreal. 



LA CADENA " and " LA FLORA " The Cream of the Havana Crop. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The McKay Milling Co., Ltd., 

OTTA"WA, 

Manufacturers of High Grade Patents, Strong Bakers, 

and Family Flours. 

Q A I |Vr & A Li^^Granulated, Mid Cut, Fine Cut, Flour Cut and Round Cut. 



WE MAKE THE CELEBRATED 



ROLLED OATS. 




Qw 



SPRAY 



"Wormy Fruit . 
and Leaf Blight 
of Apples, Pears, 
Cherries, and Plums 
prevented ; also Grape 
and Potato Rot— by 

Sirayingwith Stnhl'a 
uuble Acting Excelsior 
Spraying Outfits. Best 
in the market. Thousands * 
in use. Catalogue, describ-L 
ing all insects injurious to 
fruit, mailed Free. Address 

WM.STAHL,Quincy,lir 





mr/mmmmmmtmmwm 






1 DIES& CHILDREN S 
BO OTS& SHOES 



PREPARED BY 



THEPURE GOLDMANF G CO. 



^- TORONTO ONT.^« 



WsmmmmmmmmmL 





Crosse & 
Blackwell 



CELEBRATED FOR 



&SU/A 



W0 

mm 



M 



Jams, 

Pickles, 

Sauces, 

Potted Meats, 

Table Delicacies* 

SOLD BY 



All Grocers in Canada 



- Spices, Coffees, Extracts — _ 

. Our Stock of . , a i - ^ ti j • ls Com P lete • 

and Baking Powders ; . 

French Mustard, Catsup and Fruit Relish. The finest 
goods on the market. Try a Case. 



Gorman, Eckhart & Co. 



London, 
Ont. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



► CHEESE 

IN GLASS JARS. 



THE BEST 

MacLaren's 

IMPERIAL 



WRIGHT & COPP, 

DOMINION AGENTS, 

TORONTO. 



FRY'S 

Pure Concentrated 

COCOA. 



Is the strongest preparation of Cocoa 
made, and is absolutely pure, without 
flavoring matter or any other ingredi 
ents. 

It is recommended by the highest 
medical authorities for its marvellous 
purity and strength and soluability. 
It is a profitable line to handle. 



The highest grade of Pure Cocoa manufactured. 
For sale by all leading dealers. 

Toronto Office, J. S. FRY & SONS, kl]/ 2 Wellington St, E. 



PRESERVITAS 



H 



The use of this product has enabled 
Australian Butter Makers to capture 
the English Butter Market and obtain 
higher prices than is paid for any other 
make of butter — See Editorial Notes 
Canadian Grocer, in issue of Jan. 13. 




OR preserving Butter, Milk, 
Cream, Eggs, Meat, Poultry, 
Game, Etc., during the - 
Warmest Weather. 

Wanted, one Dealer in each District to sell Preservitas to Dairymen. 

Consignments of Butter, Cheese, Bacon, ^_^ 

Lard, Eggs, Etc., solicited for the Markets Agent yV^ p tAGAR, Halifax, N. 5. 

of London, Liverpool, Glasgow and Halifax = — -* ». ^w m. m. * » ? 



Bagter's 

Nonpareil Jellies, 

All Flavors 



7U 



Bagter's 

Jams, Jellies, 

Marmalade 



IMPORTANT 



Inadvertently we stated in our two last advertisments that we had bought out the 
stock and goodwill of Messrs. Tees, Wilson & Co. ; whereas, our advertisement 
should have read " Having bought out the Grocery Stock ot Messrs. Tees, Wilson 
& Co. we are offering special values during the next two weeks. 

Messrs. Tees, Wilson & C o. continue business at their old prem- 
ises, giving special attention to Teas, Coffees and Spices. 



CftVERHILL. ROSE, HUGHES & CO. r Montreal 

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THE CANADIAN GROCER 







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the e. B. E DDY 0°' s 

MATCHES 

Indurated Fibre Ware, 
Woodenware, 

Washboards, 

TEA, TOILET, TISSUE 

and WRAPPING PAPERS, 

Are sold by all Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Canada, 
Are recommended by all Users, and 

Are fully guaranteed by the Makers. 




Toronto Branch: 29 Front St. W. 
Montreal Branch : 318 St. James St. 

MAMMOTH FACTORIES : 

HULL, - CANADA. 








\ 




published 

weekly- 
zoo per year 




published in tl?e interest of (Jroeers, fanners, produce and provision Dealers 

aijd general Storekeepers. 



Vol. VII. 



TORONTO, FEBRUARY 3, 1893. 



No. 5 



J. 8. MCLEAN. 

President. 



HUGH C. McLEAN, 

Sec.-Trea9 



THE J. B. McLEAH PUBLISHING COMPANY. 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

AND 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 
HEAD OFFIOE : . . 10 Front St. E. 

MONTREAL OFFICE : - 146 8t. James 8t 

E. Desbarats, Manager. 

NEW YORK OFFICE : Room 41, Time* Building, 

Roy V. 8omervllle, Manager. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH : 

Canadian Government Offices, 

1 7 Victoria St., London, S. W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

Efficiency is the condition that usually 
characterizes the officers of the Toronto 
Board of Trade, and the result of the recent 
contest is a quarantee that there will be no 
impairment in this particular during the 
ensuring year. Mr. D. R. Wilkie, as presi- 
dent, will give grace, dignity and capability 
to that, office. In years past he has been 
one of the most faithful members and pains- 
taking officials of the board, and his eleva- 
tion, by acclamation, to the highest position 
in the gift of the members is a just recogni- 
tion of services well and honorably rendered. 
It was only proper that Mr. Hugh Blain 
should be kept in the vice-chair for an- 
other term. Mr. Blain is destined, both 
by order of advancement and by meri- 
torious services, to fill the presiden- 
tial chair, and when he vacates his present 
position it will doubtless be to take the one 
higher. The centre of interest was around 
the contest for the second vice-presidency, 
but the lot again fell to Mr. S. F. McKinnon. 
It-is gratifying to see Mr. John J. Davidson 
again in official harness. When he retired 
from the presidency a year ago neither coax- 
ing nor coercing could keep him from his 
purpose of stepping down among the private 
members. He may be expected to give a 
good account of himself in the council of 
1893. It is pleasing to note that the Board 
of Trade will not for a year lose the services 
of Mr. H. N. Baird as it did when Mr. 



Davidson vacated the presidency, he having 
allowed himself to be placed on the council. 

* * * 
Selling sugar at or below cost seems to be 
a practice confined to no one city, country 
or continent. In Birmingham the situation 
has become so aggravated that a mutual 
desire to bring about a better state of affairs 
has sprung up. And this desire the other 
day crystalized into a meeting called by the 
Grocers' Association of the town to consider 
the situation. At this meeting it was point- 
ed out that the wholesale price was much 
higher than a few months ago, and yet the 
retailers had made no change, although they 
were selling at an actual loss. It was agreed 
to advance the price tfd., and a committee 
was appointed to make arrangements for 
giving effect to the resolution. At the same 
time it was decided to raise the price of 
bacon, ham and lard id. The reason ad- 
vanced for this was similar to that in the 
case of sugar. Behold how good a thing It 
is for brethren to dwell together in unity ! 

* * * 
John Burns, the English radical and lead- 
er of the labor party in the British House of 
Commons is not always noted for the wis- 
dom of his sayings. Like too many of his 
stamp his remarks tend to excite rather than 
to benefit his auditors. The other day he 
made a laudable departure and, strange to 
say, his criticism was not of capitalists or 
of employers of labor, but of the working 
people themselves. The occasion was a 
meeting held in London in favor of the 
early closing movement. He declared that 
the onus for the present unsatisfactory 
condition of trade should rest on the should- 
ers of the purchasing public rather than on 
those of the assistants, and he declared that 
he knew no more disgusting or degrading 
sight than was to be found in any poor 
man's market-place between the hours of 
nine and twelve at night. The waste, the 



extravagence, the dishonest trading could 
there be seen. Working people connived 
at late shopping to an extent neither right 
nor justifiable. All shopping should .be done 
between sunrise and sunset. He would 
like to see the shops open for twelve hours 
only, with the assistants working only eight 
however. 

* * * 

As long as there is a trout in the stream 
the angler will fish ; as long as there is a 
customer on the street the average store- 
keeper will keep his shutters down, or rather, 
in more modern parlance, keep his window 
blinds up. In this city, and in fact in this 
province, much has been done in regard to 
educating both merchant and customer in the 
principles of early closing, but there is still 
much to be done. Better work, and on the 
whole more work, can be done in a reason- 
able than in an unreasonable period of con- 
tinuous labor, for the brain is clearer, the 
heart lighter, and, consequently, the energy 
more active. But the wheels of progress 
move slowly. 

* * * 

The hot contest between Medical Health 
Officer Allen and the brewers and ice men 
seems to be cooling down. In the meantime 
the ice houses are filling up. 

* * * 

The annual meeting of the Board of Trade 
held a few days ago was more than usually 
interesting in the sense that before it was 
delivered two important addresses — that of 
the retiring president and that of the presi- 
dent-elect. The address of Mr. Baird was 
devoted largely to the consideration of the 
question of extended trade relations with 
the Mother Land. His views are pretty 
well known in this particular, and during 
his recent deliverance he did not say much 
that was particularly new. But a good thing 
is worthy of repetition, and what he did say 
was said well. His words were the ex- 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



pressed opinion of a mature mind and the 
deliberations of a practical business man, and 
not the verbosity of the average politician ; 
he spoke for his own and for the pocket of 
his fellow exporters. He pointed out that in 
spite of a McKinley tariff the export trade 
of the Dominion had been larger during the 
past year than before, but, at the same time, 
he doubted whether the middle man and the 
producer had " shared to a like degree in 
this activity and profit." As to how the de- 
sideratum of extended trade was to be 
secured he carefully steered clear of any- 
thing that policians would define as being 
flavored with partyism. He merelyjreferred 
to what others had said regarding the ad- 
visability of lowering our tariff " oh goods 
imported from Great Britain that we our- 
selves do not manufacture and on the goods 
produced by those who have expressed their 
readiness to compete with outside manufac- 
turers." And while he did not go so 
far as to unequivocally commit himself 
he intimated that greater trade inter- 
changes would be the result. " In- 
creased exports and imports usually go 
together" was his final deliverance upon 
this question. He referred to the steps be- 
ing taken to provide an insolvency law, and 
uttered a truism when he added : " It is 
proper, however, to remind you that so long 
as trade is overdone and conducted on un- 
sound principles no law will save merchants 
from loss by bad debts." The Dominion, 
he held, had outgrown the present Atlantic 
service, and he expressed his hearty approval 
in the efforts being made to increase its 
efficiency. 

* * * 

Mr. Wilkie also paid some attention to the 
tariff. He expressed the hope that whatever 
changes were made " the welfare of the Do- 
minion of Canada as an existing and as a 
continuing whole will be the one object kept 
constantly in view." The iron industry came 
in for some mention and the question was 
asked : " Is it not possible by an extension 
of the bounty system and by a reduction in 
the tariff on iron to fuse the apparently di- 
verse interests of producer and consumer ?" 
He intimates that in his opinion the renew- 
al of the royalty upon the ore would assist 
in the premises The slow and indifferent 
Atlantic service was held to be the means of 
diverting " the flow of a most desirable class 
of agricultural settlers to other shores, gives 
to foreign lines of railway and foreign steam- 
ship companies the benefit of a very con- 



siderable portion of our carrying trade, helps 
to maintain high rates of freight, which must 
be borne for the greater part by the agricul- 
turists and hinder the development of the 
provinces from Nova Scotia to British 
Columbia." Mr. Wilkie intimated that 
the payment of a reasonable subsidy 
by the Dominion Government towards the 
maintenance of a fast Atlantic service would 
receive his endoisation and, he hoped, that 
of the board as well. The need of better 
railway communication between Toronto and 
New York was pointed out and an early re- 
vision of the inland postal rates urged. *A 
subject that should receive the careful con- 
sideration of the board was his reference to 
the extension of the arbitration privileges. 
Arbitration is more and more coming to the 
front as a medium for the settlement of dis- 
putes of all kinds, and the Toronto Board of 
Trade, if it is to maintain its characteris ic 
spirit of progressiveness, cannot afford to al- 
io w its esteemed president's suggestion to 
pass unheeded. And judging from remarks 
dropped here and there it is not unlikely to. 
* * * 

Governor Fowler of New York State pro- 
poses to extend the trolley system to the 
propulsion of canal boats on the Erie Canal. 
The idea, so far as we know, is a new one, 
but that is no reason why it should not be 
feasible. The trolley has proved successful 
for propulsion on land ; why not on water ? 
The Governor thinks the trolley system 
could be applied to the Erie Canal between 
Albany and Buffalo with great advantages, 
including the saving of from three to five 
days' time on the journey of the boats. The 
distance is about 305 miles, and it is esti- 
mated that by the trolley system it could be 
covered in about three days. Rapid transit 
means in the long run cheaper transit, and 
the result of Governor Fowler's suggestion 
will be watched with interest by shippers 
and business men generally. 

* 
The Ontario Government has, with com- 
mendable, and in fact unusual, promptitude 
crystalized into law, by order-in-Council, 
the recommendations of the Provincial 
Board of Health giving more power to the 
elbow of medical health officers for regulat- 
ing the cutting and storing of ice. The re- 
gulations were drafted at a special meeting 
of the provincial board held Tuesday of last 
week and within three or four days after- 
wards they were full-fledged legal enact- 
ments. The new regulations consist in all 



of five clauses. Under these clauses the 
powers of local boards of health are extend- 
ed to the supervision of the cutting and 
storing of ice in outside municipalities 
whenever the ice cut is intended for use 
within the municipality in which any such 
board has jurisdiction. Whenever there is 
any doubt about the purity of ice the Provin- 
cial Board of Health shall have the deciding 
and final voice. For a violation of the regu- 
lations there is liability to a fine of from $50 
to $500, but the most powerful clause is that 
empowering medical health officers to enter 
ice houses and seize and confiscate ice cut 
and stored which has been taken from a 
source not approved of by the proper au- 
thorities. The regulations are not retro- 
active, and consequently the ice that so far 
this season has been illegally taken will be 
beyond the reach of the law. 

* * * 

An absolutely pure ice supply is essential 
to the publie health, and, in view of the pro 
bability of cholera striking this continent 
this year, it is necessary that precautions 
more than usually strict should be taken to 
guard every avenue through which the dread 
invader might attempt an entrance. Busi- 
ness men cannot be too particular about the 
class of ice that gets into their refrigerators, 
for if disease germs may not creep into the 
provision department they will get out into 
the store, be inhaled by clerks and custom- 
ers, and fasten themselves upon the gelatin- 
ous and fatty substances exposed to the air. 
An ounce of prevention is a good thing. At 
the moment report comes from Cincinnati 
stating that a disorder known as ice 
diarrhoea is epidemic in that city, and it is 
attributed to the use of ice taken from the 

Ohio river. 

* * * 

The spice market seems to be riding on a 
bull wave. Ginger continues in the ascend- 
ency and, judging from the exceedingly low 
stocks on the London market, it looks as if 
prices are going to favor the seller for some 
time yet. During the last few days cloves 
and spices have caught the infection and 
they too are now advancing. 

* * * 

The marked advance in pork is beginning 
to affect, and that materially, the price of 
canned beef. Higher values are usually 
looked for about this time of the year, but 
the manufacturers' advances announced 
Tuesday were in some respects startling, 
Clarke & Libby's 14s., for instance, being 
raised $2 a dozen. In ones and twos of the 
same make the advance was from 10c. to 
15c. a dozen. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A CHEESE DIFFICULTY. 

A letter from the secretary of the Bristol 
provision trade association, in answer to the 
criticism at the recent St. Therese dairy 
convention and resolutions adopted at a re- 
cent meeting of the Montreal butter and 
cheese trades association, is causing consid- 
erable comment in Montreal. The Bristol 
people make a pretty good case and seem to 
justify the course they have taken with re- 
gard to " French cheese." It appears that 
shipments of this cheese were made to 
Bristol this season under the caption of 
" French Canadian " by Montreal shippers, 
and of course did not fill the bill, tor al- 
though there is as fine cheese turned out of 
the French district as any other, the factories 
that do so are the exception and not the 
rule. 

The primary cause of all the trouble is the 
greed of some shippers to outdo others by 
making short sales at a price below the mar- 
ket in the expectation of a drop in prices. 
This was done frequently last year, and as 
the market did not drop the seller had to get 
the goods to fill his shipment as best he 
could. He could not touch finest Ontario 
stock at the price he quoted, and his 
only recourse was to go down to the French 
market boat and bid over everyone else on 
the stock offered to fill his sales. This cheese 
was shipped as finest Canadian. But if 
the shipper was unscrupulous on this side 
the buyer in Bristol was not entirely blame- 
less. He must have known that the offers 
he received were below the market and that 
there was a nigger on the fence somewhere, 
so if he was stuck it served him right to a 
certain extent. This is no plea however for 
a continuation of the practice, and it is to 
be hoped that the trouble which has arisen 
this year will effectually put a stop to such 
business next season. Both seller and buyer 
will find it pays best in the long run to act 
straight and above board with each other. 



MONTREAL CORN EXCHANGE 
ASSOCIATION. 

The Montreal Corn Exchange held its an- 
nual meeting last week for the transaction 
of the usual business, and the election of of- 
ficers, there being a full attendance of mem- 
bers. The meeting was short, sweet, and 
unanimous, the annual report being adopted 
and the officers elected as follows : 

President, Mr. D. A. MacPherson. 

Treasurer, McDonald Robertson. 

Committee of management, Messrs. John 
Baird, A. J. Brice, M. A. Hastings, A. G. 
Thomson, E. F. Craig, and A. Peddie ; 
Board of Review, G. M. Kinghorn (chair- 
man), Messrs. T.A. Crane, John Dillon, C. 
H. Gould, J. O. Lafreniere and Stewart 
Munn. 

The annual report, among other things, 
called attention to the question of the canal 
tolls, and recommended that the Associa- 
tion place itself on record in favor of their 



entire abolition, so that there should be 
absolutely free waterways to enable us to 
compete with United States ports and car- 
riers. 

Reference was made also to the negotia- 
tions between the Association and the 
American railway companies with regard to 
grain in transit via New York ; also an ap- 
proval of the recommendation that all term- 
inal elevators at the lakes and seaboard 
should be declared and made regular ele- 
vators, with the Government inspectors in 
complete control, all grain to be inspected 
on entering and leaving. 

The report also declared against the re- 
vival of the call board system, and endorsed 
the stand taken by other commercial bodies 
in regard to the new provincial taxation. 

The following have been admitted to 
membership in the association during the 
past year : — Mr. Edmond Denis, the Can- 
ada Meat Packing Co. ; Mr. J. R. Ronald, of 
Messrs. Harling & Ronald ; Mr. Walter 
Oliver, and Mr. Harold Hampson. 

Died— F. H. Warrington, July 26th ; D. 
J. Rees, Sept. 17th ; Walter Wily, Oct. 27th; 
L. P. Duncan, Dec. 22nd ; M. P. Ryan, col- 
lector of customs, Jan. 15. 



THE GROCERS' AT HOME. 

Editor of The Canadian Grocer. 

Dear Grocer, — It does one good to 
take up the Grocer and read its contents 
each week, there is something always bright 
and suggestive in its columns. I think last 
week's issue is particulary good, your lead- 
ers are sound and encouraging, the bur- 
lesque on the Retail Grocers' At-Home by 
" Dinny Callagan," is quite funny and in it 
are some good hits, but I think " Dinny" 
overlooked one very important part of the 
programme, viz., the squeaking of the new 
boots got for the occasion no doubt, and 
worn by the obliging ushers who so gallantly 
waited upon the ladies in finding chairs for 
them; perhaps "Dinny" being so accustom- 
ed to the squeaking of the pigs accounts for 
him not noticing it, at the same time some of 
those who took part in the programme were 
visibly annoyed by this uncalled for inter- 
ruption. The clipping from the Produce 
Markets Review should be very interesting 
to all grocers, treating as it does so fully on 
the subject of blended tea, this article is 
particulary interesting and encouraging to 
me, having treated on this subject in the 
Grocer last summer, I am now well. re- 
warded for my feeble efforts, in reading from 
such an able and well informed journal as 
the Produce Markets Review, identically the 
same views as taken by myself on the sub- 
ject of packet teas being introduced and sold 
by the retail grocers. I was taken to task 
severely by some and called a crank and 
many other forbidden names, for daring to 
give my opinion on this subject. It is now 
very gratifying for me to read that there are 
some greater " cranks " in the world who 



condemn the offering and pushing of packet 
teas by the retail grocers. The advice given 
by this journal ought to be of some weight, 
and I have no doubt that the grocers gener- 
ally are waking up to the fact that packet 
tea, after all, is not the " satis superque " to 
success, as they so foolishly anticipated it 
would be. The article from the Produce 
Markets Review clearly shows that " dream- 
ers " in business are not a success in these 
progressive times ; indeed, they are not 
wanted at all, but the thorough practical ex- 
perience men who, having gained a know- 
ledge of the business in which they are en- 
gaged, are the men sought after and are at a 
premium to-day both in wholesale and retail. 
Why have we not more of them, dear Gro- 
cer, can you tell us ? 

Respectfully yours, 

Stephen Hustwitt. 



THE BANANA TRADE. 

ITS RAPID INCREASE. 

The banana trade of the United States 
has grown to be enormous. During ten 
months of the past year the imports of this 
fruit were valued at over $4,500,000. For 
the same period the imports of lemons were 
valued at $4,039,437; the imports of oranges 
at $1,053,549; and the combined imports of 
all fruits, fresh and dried — excepting ban- 
anas — at $7,801,292. Thus the bananas 
amounted to four times as much in value as 
the oranges and constituted over one-third 
of the fruit imports of the United States. 

There are 26 steamers in the banana trade 
plying between Cuba and New York the year 
'round. Between the months of April and 
July a steamer arrives at this port about 
daily, and during the busy season each 
steamer will discharge her cargo — which 
averages 12,000 bunches — and depart the 
same day in ballast. 

The demand for bananas has increased so 
rapidly that it is estimated that this year's 
imports will show a much larger total than 
any previous year. 

BANANA FLOUR. 

Some remarkable prophesies have been 
made according the possibilities of banana 
flour, and some big stories have been told 
about the extensive use to be made of it by 
the German army. But so far the use of the 
fruit in this way has been confined to very 
narrow limits and is yet in the experimental 
stage. This so-called flour is produced in 
small quantities in some parts of Australia 
and is said to be very good for making por- 
ridge, prepared in the same manner as oat- 
meal, and can be used for making cakes and 
puddings, taking one-half of the product to 
one-half of wheat flour. For producing this 
flour the fruit is taken when it has attained 
full growth but while still green and dried in 
the sun or in evaporators. After it is dried, 
which process is accomplished very quickly, 
it is broken up and then passed through a 
mill that will reduce it to globules — not pul- 
verize it. — Commercial Enquirer. 



6 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE CALIFORNIA ORANGE CROP. 

Early in December after a visit to South- 
ern California we set down the orange crop 
on the trees at i,8oo,coo boxes. The Santa 
Fe Railroad Company a month later, after 
a careful canvass of the whole southern 
section, gave details of its work which re- 
sulted in an estimate of 1,767,590 boxes. 
This is the equivalent of somewhat less than 
6,000 cars of 300 boxes each. Other esti- 
mates set the crop at 6,500 cars and some 
as high as 7,000 cars. D. W. McLeod, a 
Riverside grower, complains of these high 
estimates as being the out-givings of the 
buying interest and gives his own figure as 
5 ,00 j cars. 

Whatever may be the disagreement as to 
the quantity of the crop there is no dispute 
about the quality. All agree that it is of an 
excellence never before known in the State. 
The fruit is of a good growth so that the re- 
gular sizes, 128 to 196 to the box will take in 
nearly all the crop leaving but few extra 
large oranges and not a large number of 
" culls." The color of the fruit, too, is very 
high, and the flavor is that pleasant piquancy 
which makes the California orange in its 
prime state so great a favorite. A much 
larger proportion of the crop will be of the 
Washington navel variety than ever before. 

As to the situation, Mr. McLeod's letter 
sets it forth better than anything else could 
do, as Riverside, where the following action 
was taken, will ship 2,000 cars, or one-third 
of the crop of the State : 

" The growers and packers of Riverside 
and San Bernardino county have concluded 
not to indulge in the pastime of Kilkenny 
cats, but are trying to formulate plans for 
the better distribution of our crop. It is the 
intention to stop all consignments and sell 
all the fruit f.o.b. Riverside, except, of course, 
culls and second-grade fruit. A uniform 
system of packing and uniform price will do 
much to place our fruit in the position it de- 
serves. Indiscriminate consignments demor- 
alize any market. Some of the best com- 
mission men in San Francisco and other 
cities have frequently told me they would 
prefer to buy oranges if there were no con- 
signments. The demand would then con- 
trol the supply. While we do not expect 
exorbitant prices, by concerted action we 
can secure a fair price for a good article. 
Prices will be fixed every Saturday for the 
ensuing week, and by holding back the ship- 
ments, merchants never need fear the disas- 
trous effects of a falling market. The f.o.b. 
prices today are Washington Navels $3.50 
and Seedlings $2.25 per box, which are very 
satisfactory. 

" There is a growing feeling in Riverside 
for a permanent organization of every orange 
grower in the city into a corporation, with a 
board of trustees of say 1 1 of the most ad- 
vanced, best posted men. They are to elect 
a president and secretary, and thus pave the 
way to have all the fruit grown in Riverside 



manipulated by one agency. Hire a man 
who has the brains and business experience 
to manage it, if we -have to pay the salary 
paid Mr. Leeds by the Traffic Association, 
$10,000 ayear. This would only be a trifle 
over i^c. a box for this year's output, and 
the expense would rest on the income." 

Mr. McLeod, of course, takes the growers' 
view of the matter. Whatever may have 
been the prices fixed at Riverside, there has 
been no day in San Francisco when $3.50 
could be had for any excepting most select 
navels, and the same is true in even a more 
emphatic sense of the price of seedlings. 
But the market has not fairly opened here 
yet. Indeed the fruit is not yet at anything 
like its best. It is later in the spring when 
the Florida crop is exhausted that the Cali- 
fornia orange has its " innings." 



PRICE CUTTING A SHORT-CUT TO 
CONSOLIDATION. 

Having decided upon one's destination, 
the next point to be determined is, by what 
route to reach it. 

The destination toward which nearly if 
not quite all commercial enterprises are 
tending, is consolidation of allied branches 
of trade. As urged in these columns before, 
it is not a matter of choice or for debate, but 
of destiny. Newspapers may cry out against 
it, demagogues may howl of its clamitous 
foreshadowing, politicians may frame laws 
in opposition to it, but the same can be done 
concerning the blowing of the east wind and 
with the same effect in either case. This 
much being settled, the pathway by which 
consolidation is to be reached from time to 
time, by those immediately active in secur- 
ing it in any given business or locality, be- 
comes the most interesting question to con- 
sider. 

Retail grocers have congratulated them- 
selves that, because of the necessary con- 
venience of the neighborhood grocer, the 
question of consolidating would never affect 
them. But the extension, cheapening and 
perfecting of the telephone system are the 
only things necessary of accomplishment in 
order to make it possible to reduce the num- 
ber of retail stores to a small fraction of the 
present number. 

Meantime the malodorous price-cutter is 
doing much toward forcing the direction of 
concentration into an unpleasant channel 
and by methods that are almost certain to 
force him outside in the cold. Concerning 
the thing itself, an English contemporary 
remarks : 

It is a terrible evil, the consequences of 
which have been manifest in the hopeless 
shattering of many a presumably flourishing 
business, and in the break-up of not a few 
homes, where otherwise there might have 
been content and happiness. Begotten of 
that fierce competition which year after year 
has been increasing in intensity, cutting has. 



got such a grip on the grocery trade that 
nothing seems able to loosen, and with that 
grip upon its throat the trade may well gasp 
its very life away. Everybody recognizes 
its deadly influence ; every speaker and 
every writer will denounce it until one would 
think that out of sheer shame the wretched 
thing would die. But it does not. Speaker 
and writer, addressing men who know en 
about the peril they are running, and whose 
conviction of the truth of what is being ut- 
tered has been formed long ago, are still 
like men beating the air for all the good 
they do, because, hideous as it is in appear- 
ance and effect, the dreadful thing lives on. 
Many men— we don't say all, because there 
are honest and honorable men to be found 
in every walk of life — condemn the practice, 
and then practice what they condemn, so 
that grocers' hearts may well faint within 
them at the prospect which opens out to 
their view. All the denunciations of cutting 
avail not one fraction, unless some means 
can be devised by which a period can be put 
to its continuance. 

The effect upon consumers, of this mania 
to use the knife, is to accustom them to low 
prices, and when they have come to associ- 
ate certain articles of daily necessity with 
certain prices the large majority of consum- 
ers will demand a continuance of the cut 
price except in cases where the condition of 
the markets can be shown to absolutely pro- 
hibit it. 

What, then, must be the result of this 
popular education in low values ? 

Two things. First : the retailer who does 
only an average business will be forced out 
of the grocery line as the small margins will 
not afford him a living on the amount of 
goods he. handles. 

Second : In order to meet the impera- 
tive demand for low prices, the only houses 
that can do a successful business w'll be 
those that can control large capital, buy in 
large lots and supply a heavy trade. In a 
word — consolidation. 

The price-cutting retailer has himself to 
blame for the retailing wholesaler. The 
cutter has educated the consumer to low 
prices and the consumer in turn has been 
set to thinking whether or not he can still 
further reduce his living expenses by screw- 
ing down prices another notch or two. With 
this object in view he has applied to the 
wholesaler. The latter, if he is of the same 
short-sighted breed of humanity as the cut- 
ter, swallows the bait and the cutter finds the 
ground slipping from under his feet more 
rapidly than even the knowing ones had 
expected. 

Thus the trade leech, or cutter, is forcing 
the issue unpleasantly and in a much more 
rapid manner than need be if he would re- 
move his suckers from retail "grocerdom." 

If he can be brought to see that he is 
wasting his own substance as well as that of 
his fellow tradesmen, there is hope of reform- 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



•' 



ing him before it is too late to benefit a 
majority of the trade. 

The only way to do this is through organ- 
ization among retailers. In towns and vil- 
lages where there are not enough grocers to 
form an effective association it is well to in- 
clude men and firms in all branches of trade, 
and even professional men as in the case of 
a surburban town cited in these columns re- 
cently. 

Ignore the principle of policy of co-oper- 
ation and you ignore that which is inevitable 
as the coming central factor in every branch 
of commercial activity. — Commercial En- 
quirer. 



BUY WITH GREAT CAUTION. 

Surh is the advice given to the customers 
of a firm in London, in connection with their 
review of the coffee market. It is not our 
purpose to use it as a text for remarks upon 
the position of coffee, reserving that until 
fuller figures of crops are at command. The 
rule, however, is a good one under all cir- 
cumstances — Buy with Caution. The temp- 
tation continually presented the retailer is 
to over-buy, he being induced to purchase 
beyond legitimate requirements through 
some tempting offer of an extra discount of 
unusual terms. Frequently there is economy 
in buying certain goods in small quantities, 
even if a small discount is sacrificed. The 
goods may be slow of sale, or of a perishable 
nature, so that the cost of carrying is greater 
than any advantage gained by a larger pur- 
chase. 

There are times when it is wise as it is safe 
to buy freely and carry a liberal stock. It is 
always wisdom to buy freely of goods that 
are in steady demand, but which are not 
always in market. Thus fancy or new sea- 
son's tea, favorite brands of canned goods, 
special marks of coffee. When the market 
price of any staple is below the cost of pro- 
duction, and as compared with the average 
price of a term of years is abnormally low, 
it is wisdom to carry a big stock. This has 
a double advantage. It affords opportunity 
for increased profit when the market 
turns and it stimulates sales. Low 
prices tend to increase consumption but 
aside from this a big stock is always an in- 
centive to the owner to turn it as frequently 
as possible, in order to keep it fresh and to ad- 
vertise his business. As an illustration take 
Vice — now unusually cheap. The grocer 
having a large stock will keep it moving at 
low prices and stimulate his trade to use it 
with greater freedom than usual, and at the 
same time keep his stock full. There is no 
risk, while the chances favor a sudden turn, 
sooner or later, toward higher prices. 

On the other hand a big stock at high 
cost is always risky. The cautious way is to 
buy frequently. Sometimes buyers are 
puzzled to know whether ruling prices are 



high or low. This can only be determined 
by keeping thoroughly posted as to the sup- 
ly and demand, the law of which invariably 
asserts itself in the long run. This involves 
a close study of statistical facts, generally a 
dry study and one avoided by merchants. 
And yet it is the well-posted man who has 
the most even record. He may not make 
money by fits and starts, gain heavily in one 
transaction and lose largely in another, but 
he is more apt to make steady progress. 

For instance, the buyer who studied the 
sources of supply of coffee, kept posted as to 
the condition of crops, has known that the 
world's production has barely been abreast 
of its requirements, and that while prices 
seemed high and were above the average, 
still they were not higher than was warrant- 
ed, taking into account the general condi- 
tions of business. He noted that manufac- 
turers were prosperous, labor well employed 
and commerce active, and had the right to 
conclude that these factors meant increased, 
consumption. As a rule operators do not 
give sufficient study to facts governing con- 
sumption, just as great a factor as produc- 
tion. The time is not far distant when the 
extension of coffee planting will make itself 
felt, and then there will come a great re- 
action; but the posted man will have dis- 
cerned the signs and be carrying a light 
stock. 

There are men whose operations are 
wholly governed by their impressions, or as 
they say — intuition. Said a very successful 
dealer : " I cannot give any reason for my 
action, but I buy or sell upon my feeling 
that the market will go higher or lower. 
This may come to me as a result of a close 
daily acquaintance with the market, so that 
my opinion is the natural and imperceptible 
outgrowth of every day affairs, but I never 
stop to consider statistics or formulate a 
campaign 

This probably accounts for the ups and 
downs of this trader, who frequently makes 
large sums and oft-times drops large 
amounts, because his impressions are not 
always correct. 

As one looks over the statistics specially 
furnished by the American Grocer, relative 
to canned tomatoes and corn, he finds that 
the present output is scarcely sufficient for 
existing requirements, in fact in so far from 
it as to prevent an accumulation of stocks 
and to foster a rising market. It is there- 
fore evident that there is the minimum of 
risk in buying early for next season's de- 
livery. Even a check to present prosperity 
would not be apt to reduce prices below 
those now current. 

It is evident from these remarks that 
"buying with caution" is buying with brains 
and in accordance with facts as they relate 
to supply and demand. The sources of in- 
formation are so open and free and trade or 
special journals so numerous, that there is 
no excuse for not being posted. 



NO POOL ON ALASKA SALMON. 

According to latest advices from the Pa- 
cific coast, there will be no " pool " of Alas- 
ka salmon packers the coming season. In 
its place will be an incorporated company 
embracing all the old "pool" concerns, 
which, according to official programme, will 
regulate prices and production to suit the 
management and stockholders. The can- 
ners who remained on the "outside " last 
season have not, as tar as can be learned, 
shown any signs of retreating from their in- 
dependent position, but they figure as a very 
small minority in the industry, and appai- 
ently have insufficient power to do serious 
mischief. The combine, it is stated, intend 
to pack 100,000 cases more than they did 
last year, and increase their earnings cor- 
respondingly, without raising prices above 
the level of official rates quoted during 
the past sixty days. This increase, it is 
figured out, is justified, since not only last 
season's pack but considerable stock carried 
over from previous years has passed into the 
channels of distribution. Efforts are still 
making to combine the Columbia River 
packers, but progress in that direction is 
rather slow, and latest advices indicate that 
serious obstacles stand in the way of consoli- 
dation this year. With the Alaska and 
British Columbia interests in compact form 
and inclined to work harmoniously, the 
"combine" interest seem to be firmly of the 
opinion that there is no cause for the slight- 
est apprehension as to ability to control the 
market during the coming season on both 
sides of the Atlantic, whether the Columbia 
River interests consolidate or not. — N. Y. 
Commercial Bulletin. 



BOARD OF TRADE ELECTIONS. 

The result of the elections of the Toronto 
Board of Trade is as follows : 

President — D. R. Wilkie (acclamation}. 

First Vice-president — Hugh Blain (accla- 
mation). 

Second Vice-president— S. F. McKinnon. 

Treasurer — J. L. Spink (acclamation). 

Council — William Christie, John I.David- 
son, W. R. Brock, D. W. Alexander, H. N. 
Baird, W. D. Matthews, G. M. Bosworth, 
Arthur White, Michael McLaughlin, George 
H. Bertram, A. A. Allan, Warring Kennedy, 
William Ince, Robert Jaffray, Barlow Cum- 
berland. 

Representatives on Harbor Commission — 
W. A. Geddes, J. T. Matthews. 

Board of Arbitration— William Galbraith, 
J. H. G. Hagarty, J. D. Laidlaw, Thomas 
Flynn, R. J. Stark, R. S. Baird, R. C. Steele, 
John Earls, M. F. Brown, J. H. Sproule, 
Charles Pearson, S. Crane. 

Representatives on Industrial Exhibition 
— James Carruthers, M. F. Brown, W. B. 
Hamilton. 

The successful candidates for the council 
and the board of arbitration were elected in 
the order given. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CALIFORNIA RAISINS. 

In marketing the last crop of California 
raisins. Pacific Coast packers have had 
much to contend with during the past four 
months says N. Y. Commercial Bulletin. 
They started out at the opening of the sea- 
son last fall in the expectation that big re- 
turns would be harvested when their stocks 
were ready for the market, but to insure the 
profits they were banking on, it was thought 
best to clinch the situation by an ironclad 
agreement among themselves to support and 
maintain prices at a point that was sure to 
net the results they were looking forward to. 
Expectation and realization are two and en- 
tirely different subjects, as the majority have 
since found, though at a very heavy cost for 
the experience. Under the belief that the 
crop would be considerably smaller than that 
of the previous year, they started out with 
very full ideas upon the value of their fruit. 
They began shipping Eastward in heavy 
quantities in October, with instructions to 
their agents in this and other markets that 
the fruit must net them such and such prices, 
the value being set in the majority of in- 
stances considerably above the ideas oflocal 
dealers, upon whom they expected to unload. 
Accompanying bids of lading, came sight 
drafts for liberal advances upon the goods, 
and these were honored upon presentation 
here upon the assurance that everything was 
harmonious among the various packers, and 
that the agreement entered into was to hold 
through the season. How suddenly changes 
at times come about ! The first shipments 
were hardly landed in this market before 
there appeared signs of an approaching storm, 
Some of the Coast packers, with an eye to 
business, thought it would be an excellent 
idea to take advantage of the umbrella that 
was raised by their brothers in the same line 
of trade, so they quietly passed the word to 
their representatives to accept orders for 
shipments at a cut from the generally under- 
stood value, and acting upon instructions 
some considerable sales were made here be- 
fore the "leak was discovered." When the 
information did get out and the treachery 
exposed, there was a rush to sell, with the 
result of prices taking a down grade until a 
point was reached never before touched in 
the history of the trade. The quantity of 
stock which changed hands in this market 
was very heavy, considerable going to deal- 
ers in neighboring cities, but of the total 
turned the largest portion was quietly ab- 
sorbed by a local merchant, who saw 
the opportunity and determined to plunge 
and cover his probable wants of the future. 
During this psriod of activity, which it may 
be said extended to all sections of the 
country, about three-fourths of the crop 
of California was marketed, or say the equi- 
valent of a million and a half boxes. By this 
time the commission men in the East had 
sold out their consignment to get back their 
advances, and, in addition, had placed libe- 



ral quantities of the fruit to arrive. The 
wisdom of the slaughter then became a sub- 
ject of discussion among the packers, and it 
was finally decided to assume pleasant rela- 
tions and again smoke the pipe of peace. 
This resulted in a determination to stay the 
flow of offerings, and to hold the remaining 
quantity on the Coast, then estimated at 
about four hundred cars, or say the equiva- 
lent of 400,000 boxes, until such times as the 
market should recover from their unbusiness- 
like methods, and rise to a point that would 
enable them to get some decent returns for 
their goods. Though this was certainly a 
wise course to pursue, the action came rather 
late for their individual interests, as they 
had placed capital in the shape of stock 
among large speculative holders who have 
been waiting the opportunity that is now 
promised. The principal holder in this 
market is now calmly awaiting developments. 
He has supplied himself with stock suffi- 
cient for many months, and is now looking 
to the West for results that will make his 
venture successful. From last accounts the 
stock held on the Pacific Coast had been re- 
duced to about two hundred and fifty cars. 
This is certainly a small quantity, and should 
be cared for by the requirements of the West 
and Northwest during the summer months. 
Already we are informed that the markets 
at Fresno and other shipping points are 
showing a hardening tendency, with two 
crown stock in bags now held at 3c. f. o. b., 
and three crown 3^c. In sympathy with 
the stronger accounts from the Coast this 
market is gradually assuming a better tone, 
with in instances a quarter cent advance 
asked and obtained for bag fruit. There is 
every reason to believe that bottom has been 
reached and that the market will continue 
to improve from this time on, though no 
greater activity is anticipated until the 
country crawls out from under its mantle of 
ice and snow, and consumers come to the 
fore in search of goods, wnich in the natural 
course of events should take place within 
the next sixty days. 



TO FREEZE OUT SCOTCH SUGAR. 

A Philadelphia dispatch to the Sun states 
that since the removal of the duty upon all 
grades of refined sugar up to 16 Dutch 
standard, a large importing trade in Scotch 
sugars has grown up at that port. The 
Scotch sugar found ready sale, and speedily 
attracted the attention of the Sugar Trust 
managers. Among the largest importers of 
the Scotch sugar is the George E. Bartol 
Sugar Company of Philadelphia. He says 
the Trust is trying to freeze out Scotch 
sugar. His Baltimore correspondent says 
that all the wholesale grocers there have 
pledged themselves to sell only the sugar of 
the Trust. Two hundred bags of the Scotch 
sugar, which were offered in Baltimore at 
3}i cents, found no purchasers. — Merchant's 
Review. 



MALT COFFEE. 

The Bavarian process of making coffee 
from malt is thus described by an exchange: 

The malt is first soaked in water at 40 de- 
grees C, and dried in a coffee roaster until 
the grains assume a glossy brown appear- 
ance. It is then sprinkled with hot water 
and the roasting is continued until the skin ' 
of the malt is loosened. A liquid having the 
aroma of coffee, and prepared as described 
below, is then sprayed into the roaster, 
which is kept revolving. When the spray is 
discontinued, the malt is further heated un- 
til it becomes quite dry. The roaster is re- 
moved from the fire and, when the contents 
have cooled somewhat, a little cocoa butter, 
or some similar fatty matter, is introduced, 
and the roaster is rotated until the " malt 
coffee " has become covered with a very thin 
layer of grease. The coffee-liquid, above 
alluded to, is made by condensing the vap- 
ors which arise when genuine coffee is being 
roasted. The condensed liquid is concentrat- 
ed by boiling, and neutralized with a little 
bicarbonate of soda. Sufficient sugar is then 
added to make a syrup, when the liquid is 
ready for being sprayed into the roaster. 
Instead of going to the trouble of preparing 
this liquid, the manufacturers sometimes use 
extract of coffee for spraying into the roast- 
er. The finished product> when ground, is 
said to be a passable coffee substitute. 



'TWAS AN ANTIQUATED FEAST. 

" I have eaten apples that ripened more 
than 1,800 years ago, bread made from 
wheat grown before the children of Israel 
passed through the Red sea, spread with 
butter that was made when Elizabeth was 
Queen of England and washed down the 
repast with wine that was old when Colum- 
bus was playing barefoot with the boys of 
Genoa," said a gentleman of a Chicago club 
the other day. This remarkable " spread" 
was given by an antiquary named Gorbel, in 
the city of Brussels, in 1871. " The apples 
were from a jar taken from the ruins of 
Pompeii, that buried city to whose people 
we owe our knowledge of canning fruit. The 
wheat was taken from a chamber in one of 
the smaller pyramids, the butter from a 
stone shelf in an old well in Scotland, where 
it had lain in an earthenware crock in icy 
water, and the wine came from an old vault 
in the city of Corinth. There were six guests 
at the table, and each had a mouthful of the 
bread and a teaspoonful of the wine, but was ' 
permitted to. help himself liberally to the 
butter, there being several pounds of it. 
The apple jar held about two-thirds of a 
gallon, and the fruit was as sweet and the 
flavor as fine as though put up yesterday." 



The Government of Victoria, Australia, 
has found the system of granting bonuses on 
the export of butter so successful that it now 
proposes to extend it to the export of cheese 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE SUGAR TRADE OF 1892. 

Throughout the whole of this year 
prices of sugar have followed a most un- 
certain and unexpected course. At its 
opening the values ruling were generally 
considered safe, and that something ap- 
proaching the all but regular augmenta- 
. tion. which characterized its predecessor, 
might be continued to the trade of 1892. 
And everything seemed to favor this 
view. The production was supposed to 
have reached a limit, which afforded 
little chance for any early or important 
addition, while the consumption had in- 
creased and was increasing in almost 
every direction. In this position, says 
The Glasgow Herald, the future stability 
of the market seemed to be assured, and 
there was the incentive to action in the 
feeling that the American refiners would 
soon need to apply to the European mar- 
kets for supplies. Under those influences, 
therefore, anticipatory purchases were 
freely made towards the close of 1891 
and at the beginning of 1892. When the 
market opened in the early days of Janu- 
ary the price of 88 per cent, beetroot 
f.o.b. Hamburg stood at 15s. per cwt.; 
but the Americans did not, as was anti- 
cipated, appear on the scene, and, there 
being only a sluggish demand from other 
sources, values by the end of April had 
dwindled down to 12s. 9d. This marked 
the first, as it was also the longest, 
period of disappointment. The tide ebbed 
so slowly, and with so much uncertainty, 
that holders retained their stocks until 
the depreciation had become serious, and 
then realizations were effected at consid- 
erable loss. After this, and chiefly in con- 
sequence of damage to the Mauritius 
crop by a hurricane, a slight improve- 
ment occurred, and during May and June, 
prices, on more than one occasion, show- 
ed a recovery of 7 l-2d. per cwt. on those 
obtainable towards the close of April. 
About the middle of July, however, this 
improvement, and something additional, 
was lost ; but before the end of August 
the long-looked-for American buyers had 
appeared, and everything was fully made 
good by a steady advance to $14s. At 
the beginning of September the price 
was 14s. 1 l-2d., but the appearance of 
cholera at the port of Hamburg now in- 
terfered with the American shipments, 
and in consequence prices again began 
to recede until the middle of October, 
when 13s. 3d. became the value. After 
this the movements were more rapid. Mr. 
Licht had longer than usual withheld 
his estimate of the crops, and, as it was 
to this all minds turned, his deliverance, 
which was given on the 22nd of that 
month, roused them to activity. His esti- 
mate gave a total production (beetroot 
and cane sugar together) of 6,250,000 
tons, or 130,000 tons less than that of 
last year, and the first effect of this was 
to strengthen the market to the extent 
of about 6d. per cwt. This shortage Mr. 
.Licht attributed principally to a defici- 
ency in the Eussian crop, but, as it was 
regarded in many quarters as being un- 
der the mark, fluctuations became the 
order of the day. Opinions concerning 
the safety of the entire estimate became 
as divergent as they are usually found 
to be with reference to all manner of 
forecasts ; but, founded on the unsatis- 
factory character of the periodical tests 
which had been made during the develop- 
ment of the crop, the halance largely 
lay in the direction of a deficiency far 
beyond his limit. This was seen in the 
greater feeling of confidence which mani- 



fested itself, and in the fact that "bear" 
operations almost entirely ceased. By 
Mr. Licht's latest statement, he estimates 
the beetroot crop at 3,365,000 tons and 
that of cane at 2,775,000 tons. 

The total imports of raw sugar into 
the United Kingdom for the eleven 
months ending 30th November last have 
been, according to the Board of Trade 
returns, 740,257 tons, against 729,406 
tons for the corresponding period of 
1891. These imports have been made up 
of 379,803 tons cane sugar and 360,454 
tons beetroot, against 320,962 tons of 
cane and 408,444 tons of beetroot last 
year. The excess of cane sugar over beet- 
root, which is observable in the importa- 
tions this year, recalls a feature of the 
trade which has been absent since 1889. 
In the latter year there were 18,369 tons 
more cane than beetroot sugar import- 
ed ; this year an excess of 19,349 tons 
shows, from an English point of view, 
a still more satisfactory state of affairs. 
Last year the imports of beetroot sugar 
over cane sugar were 87,482 tons ; this 
year this large difference has not only 
been lost, but cane sugar has surpassed 
the other to the extent, as has been said, 
of 19,349 tons. For the past eleven 
months there has been an increase in 
the total imports, as against those of 
1891, of 10,851 tons, and, adding the 
probable receipts for December as 75,000 
tons, the full total of the year will bring 
up the quantity to about the level of 
1891 ; 30,000 tons over 1890, and 62,000 
tons under 1892. The imports of foreign 
refined sugar during the eleven months 
have been 480,391 tons, against 503,- 
842 tons in 1891 and 444,308 tons in 
1890. While, therefore, the quantity im- 
ported this year is 36,083 tons over 1890, 
it marks a falling off of 23,535 tons 
when compared with last year's imports. 
This decrease in these imports is, it is be- 
lieved, likely to continue, and to assume 
greater proportions as the progressive 
reduction of the foreign bounties, which 
begins with this year, widens in extent. 
There is, indeed, a feeling gaining 
ground that, perhaps within no distant 
date, there may be from this and other 
causes, some significant surprises in rela- 
tion to the values of all descriptions, but 
especially to those pertaining to this 
class of sugar. The whole question is 
held to be surrounded with such prob- 
abilities. Sugar refiuing in continental 
countries, even under late favorable con- 
ditions, has not been the profitable oc- 
cupation it once was. Recent political 
changes in America are in the highest de- 
gree calculated to alter fiscal affairs 
there in such a way as to 
extend the use fo the article; 
and, beyond all other considerations, it 
becomes more and more apparent that 
the production can already barely de- 
fend itself against the encroachments of 
the ever increasing natural needs of the 
world at large. Even in this country, 
where the consumption is already great- 
ly higher than in any other, there is still 
room for expansion. 

Raw sugar has been exported from the 
United Kingdom during the eleven 
months to the extent of 10,877 tons. The 
quantity exported in 1891 was 12,019 
tons, and in 1890 32,220 tons. The ex- 
ports of British refined for the same 
period have been 40,916 tons, against 
33,958 tons in 1891 and 32,324 tons in 
1890. 

The stock of raw sugar in the United 
Kingdom at the beginning of this year 
was 110,880 tons ; at its close it stands 
at 92,812 tons. 

The business in raw sugar in the Clyde 
market has shown little change from 
that of 1891. The stock brought over 



from last year was estimated at 26,906 
tons, and this, added to 190,280 tons Im- 
ported up to 24th of December current, 
makes a supply of 217,186 tons as hav- 
ing been available for refining purposes. 
Of this quantity 189,771 tons were re- 
fined in Greenock, and this shows a de- 
crease of 11,835 tons as compared with 
last year's working. The imports of 190,- 
280 tons were made up of the following, 
viz., 162,536 tons beetroot, 21,828 tons 
Java, 2,266 tons Mauritius, 1,600 tons 
Brazil, and 2,050 tons cane from other 
countries. These imports are almost the 
same as those of 1891. The stock of raw 
sugar carried forward from 1891, ac- 
cording to Messrs. W. Connal & Co., was, 
as has been stated, 26,906 tons ; it was 
increased to 35,929 tons on 9th January. 
From that point it decreased, with fluc- 
tuations of a few thousand tons, and 
thereafter stood at 21,000 tons to 25,000 
tons for many months. About September 
it began to wane, and was reduced to 
10,580 tons on 15th October, which was 
the minimum point. The new crop sugars 
then began to arrive, and the stock rap- 
idly increased to 27,592 tons. Messrs. 
Connal & Co. estimate it at the close, at 
27,415 tons. 

The exports of Clyde sugar show little 
change from those of last year. The fol- 
lowing gives a comparison of the past 
ten years' business : 
Years Tons. Years Tons. 

1882 . . . 18,034 1888 . . . 12,000 

1883 . . . 16,021 1889 . . . 11,500 

1884 . . . 23,004 1890 . . . 11,000 

1885 . . . 14,183 1891 . . . 10,500 

1886 . . . 11,000 1892 . . . 11,000 

1887 . . . 11,000 

The supplies of raw material have been 
always sufficient to meet the wants of 
the refineries, except in the case of those 
refiners who prefer working cane sugars, 
the available stocks of which latter have 
sometimes been so low that short stop- 
pages pending fresh arrivals have been 
required. In order to keep up the Clyde 
stock of raw cane sugars the Liverpool 
market has been largely drawn upon for 
these descriptions ; of course, this entails 
an extra expense upon our refiners in 
comparison with their Liverpool competi- 
tors, who have the great advantage of 
a good supply of cane sugars constantly 
in their port. It is to be hoped nowf that 
cane sugar working seems to be fairly 
re-established in the Clyde, that import- 
ers of that sort will send consignments 
to Greenock for sale. There are plenty 
of sugar stores standing empty, and the 
proprietors would be greatly the better 
of some goods to warehouse, and are 
probably now willing, in order to induce 
this business, to accept rents hardly more 
than nominal, while the porterage and 
cartage charges are moderate. 

The Clyde refineries have still to con- 
tend against importations of foreign re- 
fned sugar which goes to the consumers 
direct. But whether from the enhanced 
prices of this quality consequent on fiscal 
changes abroad, or from a growing dis- 
like on the part of the public to use; these 
sugars, induced by the poor quality of 
some foreign marks, which creates a pre- 
judice against even good brands, the pro- 
gress of the replacement of Clyde refined 
by foreign white sugars seems to be 
checked. There is, however ,a consider- 
able quantity of these French and Ger- 
man sugars melted by our refiners as a 
raw material for the higher grades of 
their production, and when thus further 
purified they give an excellent result, so 
that we may hope to see this branch of 
the trade go on and increase, if the 
prices remain moderate compared with 
the finer qualities of cane sugar.— Gro- 
cers' Review of Manchester. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



ADVANCE IN SOAP. 

If anyone has fallen Into the belief that 
the price of soap was, because It has 
remained fixed for some years, unchange- 
able, like unto the laws of the Medes and 
Persians, he has found out, and suddenly, 
to, his mistake. 

Every commodity on the market Is In- 
fluenced in some way by another. Just 
now the price of soap Is being Influenced 
by the value of hogs. As everybody 
knows, the price of hogs has been climb- 
ing up at a wonderfully rapid rate of 
late. This in turn has caused tallow to 
Jump about 40 per cent, in price, and the 
end is apparently hot yet. 

Tallow Is the base of soap, and Is also 
largely used in the adulteration of lard, 
etc. Consequently, as hog fat became 
dearer, recourse was had to more tallow. 
Then, of course, the law of supply and 
demand began to exert its influence on 
the price of the latter commodity. Cot- 
ton seed oil, another article used in the 
manufacture of eoap, has also taken a 
jump. 

As a result of these concomittant cir- 
cumstances, soap manufacturers on Tues- 
day advanced prices one cent a pound. 
The advance came as a surprise to the 
trade, and has since been the principle 
topic of discussion. 



ABOLITION OF THE SUGAR DUTY. 

The abolition of the duty on indirect 
importations of sugar, while not pro- 
ductive of any probable serious loss of 
trade to the West India merchants of 
our Maritime Provinces will have a ten- 
dency to divert what little was being 
done by transhippers from Halifax and 
St. John for Montreal and western poiuts, 
to the American ports of New York, Bos- 
ton and Portland. 

The effect on our local refineries Is yet 
to be seen, and while there is just a 
chance that it may be to their disad- 
vantage in competition for Ontario busi- 
ness ; there are several points to be re- 
garded in its favor. As in many other 
staples, so in sugar may New York be 
regarded as the great market of the At- 
lantic coast of America, and it very oc- 
casionally happens that through stag- 
nation of their market values of raw 
sugars depreciate to perhaps West India 
prices, in which case New York is the 
spot in which to buy. 

The press of the upper provinces are 
advertising the claims of dissatisfaction 
in St. John and Halifax, which has oc- 
casioned our enquiry among those direct- 
ly eDgaged in the West India business, 
and we find that 75 per cent, of the raw 
sugar imported during 1892 to this port, 
was imported by the different refineries 
themselves, and while th^y may not In 
future (without a sufficient rebate in 
freight) find it easy to compete with 
Montreal, they have gained the advan- 
tage of a larger market of supply. The 
Grocer believes in the transit of com- 
merce in Its stralghtest geographical 
line, and if the dealer of Western Canada 
can import sugar or molasses cheaper 
via New York or Boston let him do It.— 
Maritime Grocer. 



PROPAGATION OF LOBSTERS. 

The propagation of lobsters in the Gov- 
ernment hatchery in Pictou Country, N. S., 
has been proving a success, and promises to 
yield a large return for the money and care 
expended on it. Eggs were gathered last 
spring at the adjacent canneries, and much 
care was taken in bringing forward the fry. 
The hatch was to the extent of 60,000,000 of 
young lobsters, which have been distributed 
along 69 miles of rocky Nova Scotian 
coasts. The lobster one year old measures 
two inches in length, and grows about two 
inches every year. 



ADVICE TO GROCERS. 

Look out that a stock of domestic dried 
fruits is not on hand when hot weather sets 
in advises American Grocer. Have the 
canned goods well reduced by the time fresh 
vegetables and fruits are generally consum- 
ed. Avoid an overstock of farinaceous goods 
in summer. Look out that olive oil, sauces, 
pickles and other goods liable to injury from 
heat are not exposed to the direct rays of 
the sun, nor placed on high shelves subject 
to a high temperature. Unsalable stock is 
made in that way. Avoid selling goods at 
any figure that are so damaged as to be 
worthless. For instance, yeast cakes. We 
recall a firm who thought it smart to place a 
pile of stale yeast cakes on the counter, lab- 
eled at half price. They sold quickly, but 
there went up a hue and cry from t^eir cus- 
tomers, of spoiled batches of bread which 
made havoc with their flour trade. 



MARKETING BUTTER. 

Butter should only be placed or rehandled 
in a cool dry cellar or room, which should 
solely be used for that purpose says Produce 
Trade Reporter. Never should it come in 
contact with any foreign ordors of any kind 
or be exposed to the air any loDger than is 
absolutely necessary to prepare it for ship- 
ment. In packing butter always use new tubs 
or firkins. Scald the package out with hot 
water and replace the hot with cold water 
and let it stand for fifteen or twenty minutes 
then pour it out and rub the sides and bot- 
tom of the package with fine salt. Never 
allow the hands to come in contact with the 
butter, as their natural warmth and heat is 
very injurious. 

Place the butter in the package with pad- 
dles and press it down firmly as you pack. 
Always fill the package well and fully ; then 
level off the butter a little below the top of 
the package, place a clean muslin cloth over. 
Fasten the lid on tight with three or four 
pieces of strap iron, one end being tacked on 
top of the lid and the other end on the side 
of the package. Then mark the gross weight 
and tare on the package. Keep in a cool 
place and ship as soon as possible, for age 
never improves butter.— Chicago Produce 
Trade Reporter. 



CINNAMON.^ 

The cultivation of cinnamon is something 
like that of a willow copse, straight young 
shoots springing up round the stump of the 
plant previously cut says a contemporary. 
These shoots in their turn are cut every 
second year— that is to say, when they are 
about five feet high and two inches in cir- 
cumference. A good many of these are sold 
as walking sticks, and find a ready market 
on board the steamers among the passen- 
gers, who think there must be a special 
charm in a cinnamon stick, though in truth 
it is hard to distinguish it from our native 
hazel. 

But, of course, the real thing to be secured 
is the highly aromatic inner bark. First of 
all, the leaves are stripped off, and then the 
bark is split from end to end with a sharp 
knife, which has a curved point; with this, 
aided by the fingers, the bark is carefully re- 
moved in lon A pieces. These are heaped up 
and left to sodden, so as to facilitate the next 
process — that of scraping off the outer rind. 

In order to do this, each piece of the bark 
is placed on a round piece of wood and care- 
fully scraped with the knife, the almost nude 
brown workers sitting on the ground and 
using their toes as an extra hand to steady 
the end of the stick. 

The bark is then left to dry in the sun, 
when it rolls itself up into tight quills. These 
are neatly sorted and packed, three or four 
inside of one another, and are made up into 
bales covered with cloth and are then ready 
for export. 

Cinnamon is so extraordinarily sensitive 
that great care has to be taken with regard 
to its surroundings on board ship, as a bale 
of very fine cinnamon will lose much of its 
delicate aroma if packed among bales of 
coarser bark. Various expedients have been 
tried to remedy this. The Portugese and 
Dutch isolated the bales by packing them 
in cocoanut fibre, or in cattle hides, but it is 
found that the only real safeguard is to pack 
bags of pepper between the bales. 



DRAWING CHAMPAGNE FROM 
SIPHONS. 

Champagne is now put np in siphons 
the same as soda water. Previous to a 
late invention this was regarded as Im- 
possible, because the acids in the wine 
In some way acted delecteriously upon 
the metal in the siphon head ; but It Is 
now an accomplished fact, and for the 
sick room it is an invaluable invention. 
No one who has had much to do with 
nursing will doubt this for a moment. 
Champagne is frequently ordered in cases 
of great exhaustion ; but as it is Impos- 
sible, however great precautions are 
taken to keep it from getting flat at 
once, there is nothing to be done but to 
throw it away after a dose, or perhaps 
a couple, have been taken from it. Now, 
by the siphon system, the virtue Is re- 
tained in the wine till the last glass.— 
London Figaro. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



11 



FISH 



We carry a large assortment of Fish . It will pay you to see our travellers before 
buying, if you cannot wait write to us direct. Following are some lines to hand : 



Bbls , Labrador Herrings. 

" Cape Breton Herrings. 

" Newfoundland Herrings. 

" Gibbed Herrings. 
Half bis. Gibbed Herrings. 

" No. i, Split Herrings. 

" Sea Salmon. 

" Sea Trout. 

" No. 2 Fat Mackerel. 

" No. 3 Mackerel. 

Our stock of " Canned Fish " is large and contains every- 
thing required by the Grocer. Send us your orders. . . 



Cases, Boned and Skinned Cod. 
Boxes, Nova Scotia Turkey. 

" Munn's Codfish. 

" Quail on Toast. 

" Imperial Fish. 

" Bloaters. 

" Smoked Herrings. 
Kitts, No. 2 Mackerel. 

" No. 3 Mackerel. 



LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



WANTED DRIED APPLES. 



Every Groeer Requires One-( p ATENTE D 



C owiter Tea-Mixer 



The price of this Mixer is so low and its utility so great iio grocer should") 
hesitate to order at once. It is only a question of time before the old 
style of mixing tea by hand is a thing of the past. .... 

Sent by express to any address on receipt of $1.50. Nickel-plated 
50 cents extra. ........ 

Worth ten times its cost to any grocer. .... 

For further information drop us a card for descriptive circular. 



The handiest article ever placed on a counter. 
Made of brass throughout ; will last a lifetime. 
A great time-saver ; a perfect mixing machine. 
Every merchant thoroughly delighted with it. 
A Grocer using it a few days feels lost without it. 



W.H.Gillard&Go. 

HAMILTON 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS : : 



RAM LALS TEA Holds the Fort 



Sold Only by the - - 
Retail Grocery Trade 



Always same blend. 

Never gets dusty on the Shelves. 

(Sells too quickly) 

One sale always leads to a repeat. 



JAMES TURNER cMCO., 



WHOLESALE AGENTS, HAMILTON. 



a 



MO/NSOON" 



PURE INDIAN TEA. Always relia 
ble, never changes. In cases of 60 
1 lb. caddies, or 120 halves. 



WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED NUMEROUS LINES OF INDIAN AND CEYLON TEAS, 

IN CHESTS AND HALF CHESTS. 

STAZJSTIDAIRIO BLIEISTIDIEID TEAS. 

OUR BLENDING DEPARTMENT IS NOW OPEN, UNIFORMITY CAN BE RELIED ON. WE HAVE THE 
FIRST CHOICE OF THE MARKET AND THE BEST ESTATES AT OUR DISPOSAL, AND GUARANTEE EXCEL- 
LENT VALUE. WRITE FOR PARTICULARS. 



STEEL, HAYTER&CO. 



11 AND 13 FRONT ST. EAST 



Growers' and Importers, Toronto, 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



KSBBlli 



I 




[This department is made up largely of items 
from travellers and retailers throughout the 
Dominion. It contains much interesting informa- 
tion regarding the movements of those in the 
trade. The editor will thank contributors to 
m^il copy to reach the head office Tuesday.] 



The retail grocers of Brooklyn are moving 
to secure free berry boxes and crates. 

A movement is on foot in Pittsburg to form 
a national organization of shippers of goods. 

The eleventh annual banquet of the Lowell 
Retail Grocers' Association was a big suc- 
cess. Fully 125 grocers were present. 

The total capacity of the elevators on the 
C. P. R. is 10,000,000 bushels. The flour 
mill capacity is 8,270 barrels per day. 

When Irish mackerel, unculled stock, 
bring as high as $17 per barrel, trade may 
be said to be good remarks the Commercial 
Enquirer. 

The tea crop in the Assam valley of China 
is the smallest on record. Compared with 
last year's it shows a decrease of three mil- 
lion pounds. 

If you are troubled with dyspepsia, you 
will be glad to know that Bumham's Clam 
Bouillon will soothe the stomach and cure 
you if you diet on it. 

Irish mackerel of very fine quality realized 
$18 in the New York market, and $17 was 
paid for goods that were offered at $1 less a 
week or ten days ago. 

The first canned tomatoes are said to have 
been introduced in 1848. The man who had 
the honor of doing it was the late Harrison 
W. Crashy and his first stock sold at 50 cents 
a can. 

The retail grocers of Canton, have decided 
to petition the general assembly to provide 
for a State inspector whose duty it shall be 
to examine all goods before they reach the 
retail dealer. 

A San Francisco paper says the markets 
of the East are well cleaned up of California 
fruits, and that the carry-over on the coast 
now going forward will not disturb trade to 
any great extent. 

Its yearly report shows the Philadelphia 
Retail Grocers' Association to be worth over 
$14,000 clear of all indebtedness. The To- 
ronto Retail Grocers' Association is not as 
wealthy as that but it is good and prosper- 
ous 

Typesetters have their types so arranged 
in the case that the letters which are most 
used will be nearest at hand. For instance 
" a " is nearest of all, not because it is the 
first letter of the alphabet, but because it is 
often in request. Thus muscular action and 
time are economized. So it should be in a 



store. Walking and climbing should be eco- 
nomized. Goods most frequently in demand 
should be where they can be got at with the 
.least labor. — Commercial Enquirer. 

The chief pork packers of New York and 
the surrounding cities agree that the chief 
causes of the rise in pork have been the high 
market value of corn and the apathy of the 
farmers. The distaste of the latter to rais- 
ing hogs under the apprehension of impend- 
ing monetary loss has brought about the 
restricted supply of pork and, as a natural 
consequence, its increased value. 

Onions are going up so fast in price that 
by next spring the man who blows the 
effluvia of the piquant onion over you while 
addressing you must be <egarded as the 
owner of a fat pocketbook and a high liver. — 
Chicago Produce Exchange Reporter. 

All reports from New England fish trade 
centres reflect very firm markets there for 
barreled herring and mackerel. New York 
and other distributive markets are corres- 
pondingly strong, but New York appears to 
have the cheapest goods. 

Representatives of about half the manu- 
facturers of hominy and cornmeal met in 
Terre Haute, Ind., the other day ostensibly 
to discuss the trade outlook, but in reality to 
try and form an organization to control 
prices. Like previous similar attempts, it is 
said to have failed in its object. 

Charles S. Sinclair, the bookkeeper for 
the Armour Packing Co., who disappeared 
from Chicago Nov. 17, has been captured 
and brought back. He was a defaulter to 
the extent of $19,000. Of this sum he took 
when he decamped $7,200, and when he re- 
turned to Chicago he turned over $5,300 to 
the police. 

About 1,000 barrels Norway and Irish 
mackerel (Irish chiefly) were in the cellar of 
the warehouse of Rowland, Storey & Co., of 
New York, recently destroyed by fire. The 
goods were owned chiefly by two New York 
grocery jobbers and a Philadelphia firm. 
There were also about 200 barrels of Scotch 
herring in the cellar. 

Tobacco cutting has already commenced 
at San Juan by Martinez in the Vuelta 
Abajo, Cuba, in which district it is antici- 
pated that the production of the earlier cut 
fall about 50 per cent, below the general 
average on account of the persistent drought 
that has prevailed during the latter part of 
the past year, whereas the yield of the plant 
sown last will be fair. 

The California "Fruit Grower," January 
2 1 st, says : The heavy rains thus far have 
wet the ground very thoroughly, and present 
indications point to a very large crop of fruit. 
Cherry trees give promise of a very abundant 
crop. If climatie changes do not interfere, 
fruit of all kinds will be very plentiful in 
California this season. 

A recent report from Chicago says there 
are indications of a deal in butter similar to 
the recent one in eggs. As in the latter pro- 



duct, the reserve supplies of butter have been 
eaten up, the production is down to a very 
low point and the demand is very good. 
Buttenne men, under existing circumstances, 
are in a position where they are compelled 
to help the deal along — at least up to a cer- 
tain point. 

Lump spruce gum, as it comes from the 
trees, is worth all the way from 15 cents to 
$1 a pound, a very fair article selling at 40 
cents a pound wholesale. Ten cents an 
ounce is the common retail price for good 
gum. Lots of " patent" spruce gum, as it is 
called, is made in Bangor, and more in 
Portland. It is a pretty good thing to chew, 
if you must chew and have nothing better to 
do. It is packed in boxes, 100 lumps in a 
box, and retails at a cent a lump.— Lewiston 
Journal. 

Sugar furnished the sensation of yester- 
day's market, says Friday's N. Y. Journal of 
Commerce. The certificates of the Sugar 
Trust have been freely traded in of past days 
and bear traders have been assiduously at 
work trying to depress the stock. They 
came to grief yesterday when they were cor- 
nered by the bull pool, who marked the price 
up on them several points. The crowd 
around the post where Sugar certificates are 
dealt in was the largest that has been seen 
for many a day, and the scenes at the open- 
ing of the market were exciting. Bids vary 
ing three points in value were made at one 
and the same time. 

The possibility of refining sugar by means 
of electricity is still entertained, and a trade 
journal ('"Sugar Cane") has the following 
upon the subject : "As an instance of the 
partial employment of electricity in sugar 
making, may be quoted the fact that in the 
Hoym factory in Anhalt there has been at 
work since the middle of November a pro- 
cess for purifying the diffusion juices by 
means of electricity. The proprietor, Herr 
Behm, is credited with* the statement that 
the cost of setting up was already covered 
at the end of five or six days' working. The 
advantages are said to be : The small quan- 
tity of lime required: successful filtration of 
the scums, even where the beets were in very 




"CAIRN'S" 

HOME-MADE 



New Season's Make now Ready 
for Shipment 



GENERAL AGENTS 
MONTREAL 



Biaiklock Bros, 

WRIGHT 4 COPP, Tofonio Agents 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



Currants 



Bbls., Fine Filiatras 
Hf. Bbls., Fine Filitras 
Cases, "Atlas" Patras 
Hf. Cases, Vostizza 

H. P. ECKARDT & CO. Wholesale Grocers 



Toronto 



FOOD 

FOR 

BABIES 



EVAPORATED CREAM 



STERILIZED. 

Doctors recommend it for the sick at it is 

Easily 
Digested 

A PERCECT FOOD 

DELAFIELD, MGGOYERN & CO., 

Ql Hudson St., Sole Agents. 

NEW YORK. 

33 River Street, 

CHICAGO. 

215 California St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Per eale in Canada by 

AMES TURNER It CO 



Hamilton, Ont. 



HUDON. HEBERT <£ CIE., 



Wholesale Grocers 

AND 

Wine Importers, 

304, 306 St. Paul St., 

143, 145 Commissioners St. 



MONTREAL, CANADA. 



We Offer to the Trade 

Amarican Syrup in barrels. 

Canadian Syrup in barrels, half barrels, kegs and pails. 
Choice Barbadoes Molasses in puncheons, barrels and half 
barrels. 

Fine Labrador Herrings, Dried and Green Cod Fish, Etc., 
Etc. 

L. CHAPUT, FILS & CIE, w G H R °o L c E iSs LE Montreal 

" SYRUPS " * * * * 

Will be wanted owing to the high price 
of provisions, we have a splendid assort- 
ment. Prices are right, send for 
samples and quotations. 

CAVERHILL, ROSE, HUGHES <& CO. 

. . MONTREAL . . 

r^rtli 8 Pare Sugar Syrup 

- "WHITE CLOVER" - 

REGAN, WHITE 4 CO. - - - - 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



bad condition: easy boiling and evaporation: 
a dry masse cuite : a polarization always 
above 98 degrees, with a yield of 71 percent 
or more of the weight of masse cuite. The 
sugar tests very high, because of the rela- 
tively small quantity of ash, varying between 
36 and 0.40. The crystallization of the lower 
products was rapid, and high yields were 
obtained in all sugars. It is thought that 
the saline contents may be still further re- 
duced by at least 0.10. 

The stock of Miller & Co., furriers, etc., of 
this city, is to be sold Feb. 7. 

Among the latest assignments are Mrs. A. 
McEachern, liquors, of Mount Forest, and 
Joseph Cote, hats and furs, Ottawa. 

The Humbert has arrived at Boston with 
9,000 boxes Palermo oranges, 10,000 do 
lemons, 2,000 do. and 300 half do. Messina 
oranges, and 4,000 boxes do. lemons. 

A London report of January 21st says: 
" Lobsters are still extremely scarce, and 
only stray parcels are occasionally met with, 
for which stiff rates are required ; tall tins 
at 28 to 30s. and flats at 36 to 42s. per case 
for common to good quality. The market 
for salmon appears rather inactive, but hold- 
ers are firm, and the sales effected have been 
at quite former quotations — Alaska at 21s. 
6d. to 22s. 6d., with Skeena and Naas River 
fish at 23s. 6d. to 24s." 

Thos. G. Cranwell & Co., Baltimore, re- 
port as follows under date of Baltimore, 
Jan. 28th : " This has been a week which 
will be long remembered on account of the 
activity in future corn and tomatoes. We 
have brought heavily, heavier in fact than 
we have ever done before at this season of 
the year. The demand for future corn and 
tomatoes has been from every section. To- 
day the market is 80c. for corn and 85 cents 
per dozen for tomatoes, cash less 1% per 
cent. f. o. b. We can buy a few 2- pound 
standard future tomatoes at 63^0. cash f. 




TO YOU it is 

PROFITABLE and a 

QUICK SELLER. 

Thousands testily to its PURITY and 

Wonderful washing qualities in 

HARD or SOFT WATER. 



0. b. and occasionally we are able to find a 
carload of 3-lb standard tomatoes for future 
delivery at 82>£c. per dozen net cash f. o. b. 
but they are very scarce at this price." 

Even at the source of supply the extreme 
cost of coffee leads to the use of adultera- 
tion and substitutes, as witness the following 
from the Rio " News" : An interesting re- 
sult has been discovered of the high prices 
of coffee ruling in Brazil : the police have 
" raided" some have a dozen establishments 
professing to sell ground coffee, and found 
no coffee on the premises, the stock in trade 
consisting of Indian corn and carnauba 
beans. 

At a recent meeting of the Chicago Retail 
Grocers' Association a grocer said that kits 
of mackerel were often ten pounds short ; 
another stated that he found a barrel of 
flour fifty pounds short, and other instances 
of the same kind were mentioned. A gen- 
eral sentiment is expressed that retailers 
should weigh all the goods bought from job- 
bers, "as it seemed to have merged into a 
custom among wholesalers that they should 
make up the cost of repacking goods by a 
shortage in weight." 

The retail grocers of St. Louis, Mo., are 
making a determined effort to have the state 
garnishment laws changed in such a way as 
to give the retailer better facilities for col- 
lecting his bills than he has hithertofor en- 
joyed, As the law now stands the grocers 
claim that the retailer is practically at the 
mercy of any debtor who is not honest 
enough to pay. His wages for one month 
are exempted ; also, personal property to the 
amount of $300 and a homestead to $3,000 in 
the city and $1,500 in the country. This, 
they think, gives the debtor too many loop 
holes to avoid the payment of his debts. A 
committee from the local association has 
been working among the state assemblymen 
recently and they have exressed confidence 
in the measure eventually being passed. 

The retail grocers of Minneapolis are dis- 
cussing the question of baking powders. At 
a recent meeting of the association there was 
quite a breezy discussion. It was sprung by 
one of the members, who stated that an 
effort was being made to push the sale of a 
certain baking powder. It was stated that 
the price paid by retailers is greatly in ex- 
cess of that paid by the government for the 
same goods, and that while the profit is only 
five cents per can, it is nine cents on the 
other brands. It transpired that a concen- 
trated effort had ben made to boom this 
baking powder at the expense of others, and 
the general sentiment was in favor of dis- 
couraging its sale. The dispute was waxing 
hot, when a motion to adjourn was made and 
carried. 



TRADE PROSPECTS GOOD. 

" The prospects for trade are pretty good, 
I think," said a Front street man to The 
Grocer Tuesday. " There is hardly a th ; ng 
in the grocery line that is not firmer than at 
this time last year. Teas are much stronger 
and sugars are firmer. In fact all articles 
except peas, corn, and tomatoes, although 
even peas and corn are looking better now, 
stocks being lighter than people anticipated 
are occupying a much firmer position. 
By the bye, we have had some enquiry from 
Chicago for canned goods. They have got 
to buy peas, corn and tomatoes over there 
before long," he concluded, as he rushed 
away with an order sheet in his hand. 



QUICK SELLING GOODS. 

Goods that are in brisk demand pay the 
best profit. Such as accumulate dust may 
be marked at a heavy advance on cost, but 
they are not profit galhereis. Large sales, 
qnick returns, ample profits follow the sale 
of goods that move briskly. There is an art 
in making goods which ordinarily move slow- 
ly go out freely. Some articles sell them- 
selves, but most lines need pushing. Fancy 
groceries are as fond of public admiration as 
a vain person. Why then place them out of 
sight or? rear shelves or unconspicuous places? 
Keep them where people are forced to see 
them. — American Grocer. 



HOW TO KEEP EGGS. 

To keep eggs we know of no more simple 
and efficient way than the one we have al- 
ways practiced, and which was successfully 
practiced by our fathers for the past thirty 
or forty years. This is by taking none but 
perfectly fresh and sound eggs and setting 
them in layers on the top or small end, in a 
box or basket or anything that will hold 
eggs. We do not put anything between 
them, nor do we put them up "air-tight," 
but we always keep them in a cellar. Eggs 
that have been put away in this position, 
were after being kept six months, as good 
and fresh as the day they were laid, and we 
have never found one that was spoiled or 
stale among them, when thus served. We 
feel confident that they would keep good and 
fresh for one year. — Lancaster (Ind.) Farmer. 



TRY IT. 



ROYAL SOAP CO., 

Winnipeg, Man. 



If you want books, it is rarely wise to pay 
double price for them to a travelling book-seller 

The neglect to look after minute details in the 
factory is a source ol great loss to many pro- 
ducers. 



CRANBERRIES FOR EUROPE. 

The South Jersey cranberry growers 
especially those of Camden County are agi- 
tating a proposition to send cranberries to 
Europe. The plan is to contribute from 1 
to 3 per cent, of the crop of 1893, which will 
be donated to the Cranberry Growers' As- 
sociation and be sold at auction in the same 
manner as apples and other fruits. The idea 
is to introduce the berries into foreign mar- 
kets. The agreement has been signed by 
many prominent growers. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 



J. F. EBY. 



HUGH BLAIN. 



Batger & Cos 

LONDON, ENC. 



"NONPAREIL" 



TABLE .. Retain all the 

nutritive qualities 

1 1 F I I I F ^ of B ° ttied jeiiies 



NOTE THE DIFFERENT FLAVORS: 



Lemon, Orange, Pineapple, Raspberry, Strawberry, Noyean, Cherry, Puncji, 



Half Pints, Pints, Quarts 



Eby, B LA,N & C°- 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



T 



oronto. Ont. 






Gentlemen 




We are well . . , 
pleased with onr 
January trade to 
date, and are in a 
position with as . 
fine goods as we 
ever handled in , 
past to fill all . . 
orders 



Your Friends 



The Snow Drift Co. 



BENEFIT OF A TRADE JOURNAL. 

In nearly every instance, the merchant 
who finds himself able to cut prices and 
undersell his competitors, is the merchant 
who takes a trade journal, reads it closely, 
and thus keeps informed relative to the mar- 
kets, latest methods of doing business, &c. 
He knows when, where and how to buy. 
Such merchants attract patronage and gain 
fortunes. The others howl over his superior 
methods and abilities, decry his cut prices, 
and eventually go to the wall. — Denver 
Com'l Tribune. 



YOUR COFFEE TRADE. 

This Is the opportune time to stimulate 
the demand for fine coffee. There is 
scarcely a gathering of any moment 
where coffee is not served. Where guests 
are entertained, if at no other time, peo- 
ple are particular to have fine coffee. 
Opinions may vary as to which is the 
most enjoyable flavor, that of a strong 
or a mild coffee, but there is no difference 
of opinion about coffee having good body 
and flavor, being preferable to one of 
thin or woody flavor and light body. 

It is difficult to get high grade goods 
without paying a good price ; hence the 
dealers who are bound to have a first- 
class coffee trade give attention to qual- 
ity rather than price. Their standard 
of grade is high, and that must be re- 
tained regardless of cost. Such dealers 
insist on having fresh roasted coffee, and 
urge customers to have it ground fresh 
and made fresh. They furnish their trade 
with recipes for making a perfect cup of 
coffee, including cafe noir, black coffee, 
Creole coffee, the Turkish method, the 
Vienna style, and how to utilize coffee in 
other ways. 

They see to it that customers are sup- 
plied with coffee of uniform grade and 
therefore insist that clerks shall keep in 
mind the sort each customer uses. This 
is not an easy matter, but it can be done 
by giving it thought and attentiou.even 
if it involves keeping a record. It is sur- 
prising, in our large city stores, to note 
how familiar the floor walkers and heads 
of departments and the clerks are with 
the names and habits of customers, and 
how well they remember the character of 



goods purchased. If this is done in mam- 
moth concerns it can be done in the little 
stores. 

It is one of the recipts of building up a 
lucrative business and one which Is all 
important in establishing a reputation 
for keeping fine coffee. One who keeps 
fine tea, fine coffee, good flour, and the 
best butter can command patronage 
against all competitors. A customer suit- 
ed with those articles is sure to commend 
and advertise his source of supply. 

One of the city retailers issues the fol- 
lowing points : 

In serving, have the cups and cream 
warm and pour the cream in the cup 
before pouring in the coffee. 

One tablespoonful of coffee to each cup 
is the proper allowance. The table- 
spoonful may be scant, even or heaped, 
according to the strength desired. 

For making coffee by the French or 
precolating method, the coffee should al- 
ways be ground very fine or pulverized ; 
otherwise the full strength will not be 
secured. 

For making coffee by boiling, the coffee 
should always be ground coarse or gran- 
ulated ; otherwise the coffee will be 
muddy. 

We have special mills for pulverizing 
and granulating, and grind the coffee 
fresh for each order. 

The finest coffees cannot be sold at re- 
tail and return the seller a just margin 
below 30 to 40c. per pound, as to kind. 
We find prices changing from 25 to 40 
cents. Some prominent retailers sell Pa- 
dang Java, of fine grade, at 37 to 38c. 
others get 40c; for Maracaibo, 30 to 35 
The seller of fine coffee should have a 
good margin, for those who demand the 
best, as a rule, are willing to pay the 
price of the finest.— Amercian Grocer. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




h4h 

Famous Smoking 



Brands. 



Sterling 



- 7s 



St. Lawrence - 7s 
"SometMngGood"6s 
Magnolia - - 3s 



Every one a seller. 
Guaranteed satisfactory. 
Send for sample caddie. 



Tobacco Montreal 



DRY GOODS. 



(From the Dry Goods Review.) 
The past week has seen a continua- 
tion of a good demand for all spring 
lines. Few buyers have visited the mar- 
ket, but orders from travellers in nearly- 
all cases surpass those for the same sea- 
son of last year. The weeding out that 
took place during 1891 and 1892 has 
left the trade with only the strong men 
in it, and consequently there are few fail- 
ures, very few bad debts, and a general 
healthy state of trade. This has at last 
brought about a strong confidence in 
the minds of all concerned, and, while 
orders are not enormous, yet they are be- 
ing placed readily and cheerfully without 
hesitation or misgiving. Wholesalers also 
seem to have no fear of the future, and 
are buying readily and selling readily. 

On Tuesday one house sold several bills 
of winter Underwear. This shows that 
considerable sorting up is being done in 
heavy goods, on account of the continu- 
ation of cold weather. It is quite unusual 
for this season of the year, and its effect 
is visible in two ways. First, the stock 
of the Wholesaler is very meagre, and 
he is placing extra heavy orders for 
next season's woollen goods. Second, the 
heavy orders received by the knitting 
mills has caused some of them to hold off 
for higher prices. Prices are very stiff 
at present. This will be beneficial, no 
doubt, because during the past three 
years there has been a gradual fall in 
the price at the mills ; thus narrowing 
the manufacturers' profits. It is report- 
ed that Ward's and Algie's mills at Alton 
have already sold their whole produc- 
tion for the coming season. This is an 
indication of a scarcity in woollen goods 
next fall. 

NOTES 

The Canadian manufacturers of yarns 
and fingerings are on the market this 
week. Among these were Patton, of Sher- 
brooke ; Forbes, of Hespeler, and Handel, 
of Meaford. 

Mr. Southgate, who has been with 
Samson, Kennedy & Co. for a number 
of years, now has charge of the staple 
department in Wyld, Grassett & Darling's 
warehouse. 

In their quilt department, Gordon, Mac- 
kay & Co. report good business. They 
carry a generous stock, and can always 
fill orders quickly. Their satin quilt at 
$1 for 9-4, raising 25 cents per size up 
to 12-4, is their great seller. 

W. R. Brock & Co. report a very strong 
demand for their Bradford tweed effects 
in dress goods ; so strong are these goods 
in public favor that their stock is well 
lowered already, althouth the season 
cannot be said to be opened up yet. De- 
laines and crepons are also in good de- 
mand, but while these three lines are go- 
ing especially well, it must be said that 
all lines are in good demand. 

Gordon, Mackay & Co. are showing 
what is a marvel of value in an unlaun- 
dried shirt at $4.50, in all sizes 14 to 
17 inch. This shirt is made of a good 
cotton, with linen fronts, continuous fac- 
ings, and heavily reinforced. Their sup- 
ply will meet even an extraordinary de- 
mand. 

Alexander & Anderson are receiving 
their shipments of spring dress goods, 
both in plains and fancies. Some of the 
fancies are particularly striking, and are 
in strong demand at present. In plain 
goods, whipcords seem to be the most 
popular material for spring dresses ; and 
in fancies, shot effects, silk mixtures, etc., 
are also popular. They are showing par- 
ticularly striking lines in prints, printed 



French delaines, sateens, cretons, and a 
very cheap line of art muslins in the new- 
est and most stylish patterns. 

Wyld, Grasett & Darling have passed 
into stock a large shipment of silk and 
taffeta silk gloves, including an imita- 
tion of Suede Lisle, which can be retail- 
ed for 25 cents a pair. This line is a 
leader for spring as the glove is done up 
like a kid glove, and has a heavy kid 
feel. All these are shown also in gaunt- 
lets. In frillings a new shipment is to 
hand, in which the ostrich frilling still 
predominates. This is the third time this 
season that their stock has been replen- 
ished in these goods. In their neckwear 
department the sales have made this sea- 
son much ahead of previous seasons, and, 
notwithstanding the extra heavy pur- 
chases, it is probable that the stock will 
not be sufficient for the full demand. A 
repeat order of 1,000 dozen of spring 
underwear has just been placed. Their 
lines of brown balbriggan, natural bal- 
briggan, and natural wool are the lead- 
ing lines for this trade. 

Gordon, Mackay & Co. have a range 
of dress goods which they claim have 
never been surpassed-r-thelr shot and 
changeable effects disclosing the finest 
possible treatment of color. It is thought 
the supply of novelties is limited, and 
merchants should make their selections 
while the supply is comparatively un- 
broken. Their No. 1 special silk warp 
Henrietta at 75 cents is in ever increas- 
ing demand. 

John Macdonald & Co. report among 
the new makes of corsets, the following : 
World's Fair, Queen City, National Pol- 
icy and French Wove. Their Thompson's 
Glove-Fitting are still in strong demand. 
Among the new arrivals this week is a 
large shipment of creton fringes, purses, 
hair, cloth and tooth brushes, regatta 
negligee and white shirts. Two cases of 
neckwear are to hand, and more are ex- 
pected shortly. These are repeats of the 
best selling patterns. A shipment of col- 
ored surahs ,in cream, navy and cardinal 
and other leading shades, has been open- 
ed up. These goods are in strong demand 
at present for blouses and also for trim- 
mings. Further shipments of ribbons are 
to hand ; in ba*by ribbons a full range 
of colors is in stock again, and in all silk 
ribbons widths 5, 9, and 16 are again 
replaced. Laces are being opened up ; 
black, white and creams are shown in 
great variety, and among them is the 
new Irish Pointe, which is In such favor 
with the feminine part of the public. 



S0METHING_AB0UT FIGS. 

The unpacking, sorting, repacking and for- 
warding to all parts of the world of dried figs 
occupies more than half of the laboring pop- 
ulation of Smyrna during five or six months 
of the year. Consequently the arrival of the 
first consignment of the fruit from the or- 
chards is a great popular event, called "The 
Feast of the Figs." This year the harvest 
was magnificent and a joyous manifestation 
took place at the railway station when the 
first train arrnved, with its cars wreathed 
with garlands and its locomotive covered 
with flags. The barrels were quickly un- 
loaded and placed on cam